Latest & greatest articles for urinary tract infection

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Top results for urinary tract infection

121. Long-term antibiotics for the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infection in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Long-term antibiotics for the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infection in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis Long-term antibiotics for the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infection in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis Long-term antibiotics for the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infection in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis Dai B, Liu Y, Jia J, Mei C CRD summary This review assessed efficacy and safety of long-term prophylactic (...) antibiotics on recurrent urinary tract infection in children. The authors concluded that there was no evidence that prophylactic antibiotics were associated with a reduction in recurrent urinary tract infection. This conclusions was consistent with the evidence presented and is likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of long-term prophylactic antibiotics for recurrent urinary tract infection in children. Searching PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were

DARE.2010

122. Cost effectiveness of management strategies for urinary tract infections: results from randomised controlled trial

Cost effectiveness of management strategies for urinary tract infections: results from randomised controlled trial Cost effectiveness of management strategies for urinary tract infections: results from randomised controlled trial Cost effectiveness of management strategies for urinary tract infections: results from randomised controlled trial Turner D, Little P, Raftery J, Turner S, Smith H, Rumsby K, Mullee M, UTIS Team Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation (...) that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary This study assessed the cost-effectiveness of five management strategies for suspected urinary tract infections. The authors concluded that dipstick testing followed by targeted antibiotics was likely to be the most cost-effective strategy, if the value of a day

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2010

123. Predicting acute uncomplicated urinary tract infection in women: a systematic review of the diagnostic accuracy of symptoms and signs

Predicting acute uncomplicated urinary tract infection in women: a systematic review of the diagnostic accuracy of symptoms and signs Predicting acute uncomplicated urinary tract infection in women: a systematic review of the diagnostic accuracy of symptoms and signs Predicting acute uncomplicated urinary tract infection in women: a systematic review of the diagnostic accuracy of symptoms and signs Giesen LG, Cousins G, Dimitrov BD, van de Laar FA, Fahey T CRD summary This review concluded (...) that individual symptoms and signs had moderate accuracy for diagnosis of urinary tract infection and that accuracy improved when combined with dipstick tests, particularly tests for nitrites. The results presented are likely to be reliable, but it should be noted that relevant studies may have been missed and conclusions rely partially on data from another systematic review. Authors' objectives To assess the accuracy of signs and symptoms for diagnosing urinary tract infection in adult women. Searching

DARE.2010

124. Cranberry is not effective for the prevention or treatment of urinary tract infections in individuals with spinal cord injury

Cranberry is not effective for the prevention or treatment of urinary tract infections in individuals with spinal cord injury Cranberry is not effective for the prevention or treatment of urinary tract infections in individuals with spinal cord injury Cranberry is not effective for the prevention or treatment of urinary tract infections in individuals with spinal cord injury Opperman EA CRD summary The review found that limited evidence suggested that cranberry (in juice or supplement form) did (...) not seem to be effective in preventing or treating urinary tract infections in people with spinal cord injury. The author's cautious conclusion reflected the evidence presented, but its reliability is uncertain due to weaknesses in the review process. Authors' objectives To assess the effectiveness of cranberry for the prevention or treatment of urinary tract infections in people with spinal cord injury. Searching The MEDLINE database was searched; search terms were reported. Reference lists

DARE.2010

125. Hydrophilic catheters versus noncoated catheters for reducing the incidence of urinary tract infections: a randomized controlled trial

Hydrophilic catheters versus noncoated catheters for reducing the incidence of urinary tract infections: a randomized controlled trial 19801054 2009 10 05 2009 10 22 2010 05 03 1532-821X 90 10 2009 Oct Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation Arch Phys Med Rehabil Hydrophilic catheters versus noncoated catheters for reducing the incidence of urinary tract infections: a randomized controlled trial. 1668-71 10.1016/j.apmr.2009.04.010 Cardenas DD, Hoffman JM. Hydrophilic catheters versus (...) noncoated catheters for reducing the incidence of urinary tract infections: a randomized controlled trial. To test the hypotheses that hydrophilic catheters reduce the incidence of symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs) in persons with spinal cord injury on self-intermittent catheterization (IC). Randomized controlled trial. Community. Subjects (N=56) on IC with recurrent UTIs and who met eligibility criteria. Use of hydrophilic catheters for IC. Symptomatic UTIs treated with antibiotics. Of the 56

EvidenceUpdates2010

126. Effectiveness of five different approaches in management of urinary tract infection: randomised controlled trial.

Effectiveness of five different approaches in management of urinary tract infection: randomised controlled trial. 20139214 2010 02 08 2010 02 26 2015 07 08 1756-1833 340 2010 Feb 05 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Effectiveness of five different approaches in management of urinary tract infection: randomised controlled trial. c199 10.1136/bmj.c199 bmj.c199 To assess the impact of different management strategies in urinary tract infections. Randomised controlled trial. Primary care. 309 non (...) -pregnant women aged 18-70 presenting with suspected urinary tract infection. Patients were randomised to five management approaches: empirical antibiotics; empirical delayed (by 48 hours) antibiotics; or targeted antibiotics based on a symptom score (two or more of urine cloudiness, urine smell, nocturia, or dysuria), a dipstick result (nitrite or both leucocytes and blood), or a positive result on midstream urine analysis. Self help advice was controlled in each group. Symptom severity (days 2 to 4

BMJ2010 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

127. Women's views about management and cause of urinary tract infection: qualitative interview study.

Women's views about management and cause of urinary tract infection: qualitative interview study. 20139217 2010 02 08 2010 02 26 2015 07 08 1756-1833 340 2010 Feb 05 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Women's views about management and cause of urinary tract infection: qualitative interview study. c279 10.1136/bmj.c279 bmj.c279 To explore the views of women with urinary tract infection on the acceptability of different strategies for managing the infection, including delayed use of antibiotics (...) to alternative management approaches. With a strategy of "antibiotic delay" some women felt a lack of validation or that they were not listened to by their general practitioner. Women attributed urinary tract infection to lifestyle habits and behaviours, such as poor hygiene, general "negligence," and even a "penalty of growing old." A clear acknowledgment of women's triggers to consult is needed. If women are asked to delay taking antibiotics, the clinician must address the particular worries that women

BMJ2010 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

128. Cost effectiveness of management strategies for urinary tract infections: results from randomised controlled trial.

Cost effectiveness of management strategies for urinary tract infections: results from randomised controlled trial. 20139218 2010 02 08 2010 02 26 2015 07 08 1756-1833 340 2010 Feb 05 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Cost effectiveness of management strategies for urinary tract infections: results from randomised controlled trial. c346 10.1136/bmj.c346 bmj.c346 To assess the cost effectiveness of different management strategies for urinary tract infections. Cost effectiveness analysis alongside (...) a randomised controlled trial with a one month follow-up. Primary care. 309 non-pregnant adult women aged 18-70 presenting with suspected urinary tract infection. Patients were randomised to five basic management approaches: empirical antibiotics, empirical delayed (by 48 hours) antibiotics, or targeted antibiotics based on either a high symptom score (two or more of urine cloudiness, smell, nocturia, dysuria), dipstick results (nitrite or leucocytes and blood), or receipt of a positive result on midstream

BMJ2010 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

129. Implications of 99mTc-DMSA Scintigraphy Performed During Urinary Tract Infection in Neonates

Implications of 99mTc-DMSA Scintigraphy Performed During Urinary Tract Infection in Neonates 19661052 2010 08 17 2010 08 26 2016 11 25 1098-4275 124 3 2009 Sep Pediatrics Pediatrics Implications of 99mTc-DMSA scintigraphy performed during urinary tract infection in neonates. 881-7 10.1542/peds.2008-1963 To evaluate prospectively whether normal scintigraphic results during urinary tract infections (UTIs) in neonates were predictive of the absence of dilating vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) (grade (...) 99m Dimercaptosuccinic Acid Urinary Tract Infections complications diagnostic imaging Vesico-Ureteral Reflux complications diagnostic imaging 2009 8 8 9 0 2009 8 8 9 0 2010 8 27 6 0 ppublish 19661052 peds.2008-1963 10.1542/peds.2008-1963

EvidenceUpdates2009

130. Catheter-associated urinary tract infection and the medicare rule changes.

Catheter-associated urinary tract infection and the medicare rule changes. Catheter-associated urinary tract infection, a common and potentially preventable complication of hospitalization, is 1 of the hospital-acquired complications chosen by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) for which hospitals no longer receive additional payment. To help readers understand the potential consequences of the recent CMS rule changes, the authors examine the preventability of catheter (...) -associated infection, review the CMS rule changes regarding catheter-associated urinary tract infection, offer an assessment of the possible consequences of these changes, and provide guidance for hospital-based administrators and clinicians. Although the CMS rule changes related to catheter-associated urinary tract infection are controversial, they may do more good than harm, because hospitals are likely to redouble their efforts to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection, which may minimize

Annals of Internal Medicine2009 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

131. Antibiotic prophylaxis at urinary catheter removal prevents urinary tract infections: a prospective randomized trial.

Antibiotic prophylaxis at urinary catheter removal prevents urinary tract infections: a prospective randomized trial. 19300235 2009 04 01 2009 05 04 2015 11 19 1528-1140 249 4 2009 Apr Annals of surgery Ann. Surg. Antibiotic prophylaxis at urinary catheter removal prevents urinary tract infections: a prospective randomized trial. 573-5 10.1097/SLA.0b013e31819a0315 To assess whether antibiotic prophylaxis at urinary catheter removal reduces the rate of urinary tract infections. Urinary tract (...) infections are among the most common nosocomial infections. Antibiotic prophylaxis at urinary catheter removal is used as a measure to prevent them, albeit without supporting evidence. A prospective randomized study enrolled 239 patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery, who were randomized either for receiving 3 doses of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole at urinary catheter removal, or not. Urinary tract infections were diagnosed according to Center of Disease Control definitions. Urinary cultures were

EvidenceUpdates2009

132. Dipsticks and diagnostic algorithms in urinary tract infection: development and validation, randomised trial, economic analysis, observational cohort, and qualitative study

Dipsticks and diagnostic algorithms in urinary tract infection: development and validation, randomised trial, economic analysis, observational cohort, and qualitative study Dipsticks and diagnostic algorithms in urinary tract infection: development and validation, randomised trial, economic analysis, observational cohort, and qualitative study Journals Library An error has occurred in processing the XML document An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page

NIHR HTA programme2009

134. Serum procalcitonin for prediction of renal parenchymal involvement in children with urinary tract infections: a meta-analysis of prospective clinical studies

Serum procalcitonin for prediction of renal parenchymal involvement in children with urinary tract infections: a meta-analysis of prospective clinical studies Serum procalcitonin for prediction of renal parenchymal involvement in children with urinary tract infections: a meta-analysis of prospective clinical studies Serum procalcitonin for prediction of renal parenchymal involvement in children with urinary tract infections: a meta-analysis of prospective clinical studies Mantadakis E, Plessa E (...) , Vouloumanou EK, Karageorgopoulos DE, Chatzimichael A, Falagas ME CRD summary The review found that in children with culture-proven urinary tract infection serum procalcitonin greater than 0.5ng/mL predicted renal parenchymal involvement (defined by Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid scintigraphy) reasonably well. Limitations in review methodology together with apparent clinical heterogeneity and a wide range of reported sensitivity and specificity values mean that the authors' conclusions should

DARE.2009

135. Antibiotic prophylaxis for children at risk of developing urinary tract infection: a systematic review

Antibiotic prophylaxis for children at risk of developing urinary tract infection: a systematic review Antibiotic prophylaxis for children at risk of developing urinary tract infection: a systematic review Antibiotic prophylaxis for children at risk of developing urinary tract infection: a systematic review Mori R, Fitzgerald A, Williams C, Tullus K, Verrier-Jones K, Lakhanpaul M CRD summary This review concluded that antibiotic prophylaxis should not be recommended for infants and children (...) at risk of developing urinary tract infections. These conclusions seem overly strong given the paucity of large homogeneous trials in this area. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of prophylactic antibiotics in preventing further renal scarring and recurrent symptomatic urinary tract infections in children at risk of developing urinary tract infections. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

DARE.2009

136. Bladder irrigation with amphotericin B and fungal urinary tract infection: systematic review with meta-analysis

Bladder irrigation with amphotericin B and fungal urinary tract infection: systematic review with meta-analysis Bladder irrigation with amphotericin B and fungal urinary tract infection: systematic review with meta-analysis Bladder irrigation with amphotericin B and fungal urinary tract infection: systematic review with meta-analysis Tuon FF, Amato VS, Penteado Filho SR CRD summary The review attempted to establish the best place in therapy for amphotericin B bladder irrigation in the treatment (...) and that the best method involves continuous treatment for more than five days. Research : The authors did not state any implications for further research. Funding Not stated. Bibliographic details Tuon FF, Amato VS, Penteado Filho SR. Bladder irrigation with amphotericin B and fungal urinary tract infection: systematic review with meta-analysis. International Journal of Infectious Diseases 2009; 13(6): 701-706 PubMedID DOI Original Paper URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by NLM MeSH Adult

DARE.2009

137. Management of childhood urinary tract infections: an economic modeling study

Management of childhood urinary tract infections: an economic modeling study Management of childhood urinary tract infections: an economic modeling study Management of childhood urinary tract infections: an economic modeling study Harmsen M, Adang EM, Wolters RJ, van der Wouden JC, Grol RP, Wensing M Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results (...) and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary The objective was to assess the cost-effectiveness of a maximum care strategy for treating urinary tract infections in children, compared with the usual care. Maximum care was dominant, with lower costs and higher benefits, in the long term, compared with the usual or an improved usual care. The study was satisfactory and the methods and results were adequately reported

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2009

138. A dipstick clinical prediction rule modestly improved diagnostic precision in women with suspected urinary tract infection

A dipstick clinical prediction rule modestly improved diagnostic precision in women with suspected urinary tract infection A dipstick clinical prediction rule modestly improved diagnostic precision in women with suspected urinary tract infection | Evidence-Based Medicine This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your (...) user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here A dipstick clinical prediction rule modestly improved diagnostic precision in women with suspected urinary tract infection Article Text Clinical prediction guide A dipstick clinical prediction rule modestly improved diagnostic precision in women

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2009

139. Immunoactive prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections: a meta-analysis

Immunoactive prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections: a meta-analysis Immunoactive prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections: a meta-analysis Immunoactive prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections: a meta-analysis Naber KG, Cho YH, Matsumoto T, Schaeffer AJ CRD summary The review concluded that the oral bacterial lysate immunostimulant, OM-89, was safe and efficacious for preventing recurrent urinary tract infections, but that more research is required. Overall (...) , the authors' cautious conclusions seem appropriate, but their reliability is uncertain given the potential for bias in the review methods. Authors' objectives To assess the efficacy and safety of immunostimulants based on bacterial lysates in the prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections. Searching The following databases were searched up to September 2008: TOXLINE, MEDLINE, HealthSTAR, AIDSLINE, CANCERLIT, EMBASE, AMED, the Cochrane Library, DART (Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology), HSDB

DARE.2009

140. Antibiotic prophylaxis and recurrent urinary tract infection in children.

Antibiotic prophylaxis and recurrent urinary tract infection in children. 19864673 2009 10 29 2009 11 04 2015 11 19 1533-4406 361 18 2009 Oct 29 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Antibiotic prophylaxis and recurrent urinary tract infection in children. 1748-59 10.1056/NEJMoa0902295 Antibiotics are widely administered to children with the intention of preventing urinary tract infection, but adequately powered, placebo-controlled trials regarding efficacy are lacking (...) . This study from four Australian centers examined whether low-dose, continuous oral antibiotic therapy prevents urinary tract infection in predisposed children. We randomly assigned children under the age of 18 years who had had one or more microbiologically proven urinary tract infections to receive either daily trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole suspension (as 2 mg of trimethoprim plus 10 mg of sulfamethoxazole per kilogram of body weight) or placebo for 12 months. The primary outcome was microbiologically

NEJM2009