Latest & greatest articles for type 2 diabetes

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Top results for type 2 diabetes

1. Motivational interviewing may encourage healthy eating in people with type 2 diabetes

Motivational interviewing may encourage healthy eating in people with type 2 diabetes Signal - Motivational interviewing may encourage healthy eating in people with type 2 diabetes Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Motivational interviewing may encourage healthy eating in people with type 2 diabetes Published on 15 March 2016 A motivational communication approach may help people with type 2 diabetes eat more healthily, but may be no better than usual care for changing other (...) type 2 diabetes that, if not managed well, can cause serious long-term health problems including heart disease, stroke, blindness and amputations leading to disability. Good management includes education for a healthy diet, exercise and maintaining blood glucose levels within safe limits. Motivational interviewing is a counselling approach used to motivate people to change their behaviour, so could be useful in encouraging good diabetes self-management. It typically involves open-ended questions, reflective

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

2. Type 2 diabetes can be reversed with a low-calorie diet

Type 2 diabetes can be reversed with a low-calorie diet Signal - Type 2 diabetes can be reversed with a low-calorie diet Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Type 2 diabetes can be reversed with a low-calorie diet Published on 13 February 2018 Nearly half of people given a formula replacement diet of 830 calories per day for three to five months, followed by food reintroduction, went into remission from type 2 diabetes. They were supported to achieve and maintain weight (...) reduction by primary care nurses or dieticians. This trial involved 298 adults who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes within six years. Those that stuck with the program were more likely to lose weight (average 10kg was lost) and to go into remission compared to usual care. More than two-thirds of them were also able to stop both diabetic and high blood pressure tablets. These results were seen after one year. The challenge will be to see if the results can be maintained over the planned four year

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

3. Flu vaccine reduces deaths for people with type 2 diabetes

Flu vaccine reduces deaths for people with type 2 diabetes Signal - Flu vaccine reduces deaths for people with type 2 diabetes Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Flu vaccine reduces deaths for people with type 2 diabetes Published on 18 October 2016 Flu vaccination helps prevent some deaths, serious strokes, heart failure and pneumonia in people with type 2 diabetes. Vaccination is linked to less hospital admissions for these reasons, but there is no link to rates (...) of admissions for heart attack. The results come from a reliable population-based study that looked back at the general practice and hospital records of almost 125,000 adults with type 2 diabetes in England. Outcome rates were compared between those who had and hadn’t received the flu vaccine over seven successive flu seasons. The researchers carefully adjusted for things like the seasonal change in flu numbers. The findings strongly support current recommendations that people with chronic medical

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

4. Sulfonylureas can be considered safe for those with type 2 diabetes

Sulfonylureas can be considered safe for those with type 2 diabetes Signal - Sulfonylureas can be considered safe for those with type 2 diabetes Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Sulfonylureas can be considered safe for those with type 2 diabetes Published on 20 July 2016 This large review finds that sulfonylurea drugs are not associated with an increased risk of death, heart attack or stroke when compared with placebo, diet control or other diabetes drugs. Sulfonylureas (...) are commonly used in the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes. The drugs in this class are relatively cheap and have been available for many decades, but there have been conflicting views on their safety. The trials in this review were large enough and sufficiently long to pick up relatively rare harmful events like death. Therefore the researchers were confident that, even if there is a small risk, less than one in 200 people treated with sulfonylureas are likely to be harmed. These findings provide

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

5. Nine different drug classes reviewed for type 2 diabetes

Nine different drug classes reviewed for type 2 diabetes Signal - Nine different drug classes reviewed for type 2 diabetes Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Nine different drug classes reviewed for type 2 diabetes Published on 17 January 2017 Metformin worked best at keeping blood sugar levels under control and remains a good first choice as single therapy. Overall, the nine classes of blood sugar-lowering drugs had similar effect on risk of death from cardiovascular causes (...) and overall mortality, though estimates are imprecise because so few people died in these studies. Risk of other side effects, such as weight gain or risk of low blood sugar did vary between treatments. This very large systematic review of 301 trials compared the drugs given alone or in combination to treat type 2 diabetes against each other. The researchers analysed data from direct comparisons and from studies with dummy treatment arms together. Until now it has been unclear if there are reasons to use

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

6. Fewer large babies are born to pregnant woman with type 1 diabetes if their glucose was monitored continuously

Fewer large babies are born to pregnant woman with type 1 diabetes if their glucose was monitored continuously Signal - Fewer large babies are born to pregnant woman with type 1 diabetes if their glucose was monitored continuously Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Fewer large babies are born to pregnant woman with type 1 diabetes if their glucose was monitored continuously Published on 12 December 2017 Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes who used a continuous glucose (...) diabetic control over 12 weeks, only improved slightly. This may be unsurprising because HbA1c results are less reliable in pregnancy and women found it hard to stick to the continuous monitoring protocol. Strict control of blood glucose levels during pregnancy reduces the risk for women with type 1 diabetes, and their babies are less likely to be large or need treatment for low blood glucose. Continuous monitoring provides many readings but requires the user to deliver insulin accordingly. Motivated

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

7. Insulin pumps not much better than multiple injections for intensive control of type 1 diabetes

glucose control. They are expensive though, costing around £2-3,000, with another £1,500 per year in consumables, and have a life span of four to eight years. About 6% of UK adults with type I diabetes use pumps, which is lower than in many countries. Proponents of pumps suggest more people should be offered them. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of pumps with multiple daily injections. What did this study do? The Relative Effectiveness of Pumps Over MDI and Structured Education (...) Insulin pumps not much better than multiple injections for intensive control of type 1 diabetes Signal - Insulin pumps not much better than multiple injections for intensive control of type 1 diabetes Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Insulin pumps not much better than multiple injections for intensive control of type 1 diabetes Published on 11 July 2017 People with type 1 diabetes offered insulin pumps did not achieve better blood glucose control compared with those using

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

8. Continuous insulin pumps may help manage poorly controlled type 2 diabetes

Continuous insulin pumps may help manage poorly controlled type 2 diabetes Signal - Continuous insulin pumps may help manage poorly controlled type 2 diabetes Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Continuous insulin pumps may help manage poorly controlled type 2 diabetes Published on 18 July 2017 Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusions, or pumps, reduced the amount of daily insulin required by 24 units for people with advanced type 2 diabetes compared to multiple daily insulin (...) injections. Average weight did not differ between treatments. This review compared the two treatments in 590 people from five trials and found that the pumps were linked to slightly better control for people on higher doses of insulin and those with poorer glucose control. However, looking at all the people with diabetes in these studies, there was no difference in overall control between the different forms of treatment. One main challenge in controlling type 2 diabetes is the low adherence to treatment

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

9. Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common in children

Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common in children Signal - Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common in children Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common in children Published on 25 July 2017 The number of children being diagnosed with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is rising, but new cases of type 2 diabetes, the form associated with being overweight, has risen five-fold in about five years. New analysis in this NIHR-supported study suggest (...) that type 2 diabetes now accounts for up to a third of diabetes diagnoses in children. Amongst 100,000 school age children about six new cases of type 2 diabetes a year could be expected in the 1990s. This increased to about 33 new cases per year by the end of the next decade (2009 to 2013). Data was taken from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink, a primary care database of electronic health records. Children who are obese have about a four times greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

10. Self-monitoring of blood glucose provides no important benefit for most people with type 2 diabetes

Self-monitoring of blood glucose provides no important benefit for most people with type 2 diabetes Self-monitoring of blood glucose provides no important benefit for most people with type 2 diabetes Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Self-monitoring of blood glucose provides no important benefit for most people with type 2 diabetes Published on 23 October 2018 doi: Patients with type 2 diabetes who monitor their blood glucose themselves may see small, short-term improvements (...) in blood sugar control. This is not enough to be clinically important or outweigh the costs and personal inconvenience of long-term self-testing. Self-monitoring is a well-established strategy for type 1 diabetes and for people with type 2 who need insulin. The benefit for all people with type 2 is debatable. This review pooled 24 randomised controlled trials comparing self-monitoring with any control strategy for people not taking insulin. Self-monitoring gave a 0.3 percentage point reduction

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

11. ‘Artificial pancreas’ improves glucose control in hospital patients with type 2 diabetes

‘Artificial pancreas’ improves glucose control in hospital patients with type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes control improves with 'artificial pancreas' Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover ‘Artificial pancreas’ improves glucose control in hospital patients with type 2 diabetes Published on 13 November 2018 doi: Closed-loop insulin pumps, which continuously monitor blood glucose and administer insulin accordingly, can improve blood glucose control among patients (...) with type 2 diabetes admitted to hospital for non-critical care. Those using the system spent about six hours longer in the target range, and this could hasten their recovery and reduce staff workload. The number of hospitalised patients with type 2 diabetes is increasing. Glucose control often worsens during illness. Closed-loop pumps have been shown to improve blood glucose control in type 1 diabetes and in critical care settings. This two-centre study included 136 patients with type 2 diabetes on general

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

12. The benefits and harms of aspirin for people with type 2 diabetes are finely balanced

The benefits and harms of aspirin for people with type 2 diabetes are finely balanced Aspirin benefits and harms balanced in type 2 diabetes Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover The benefits and harms of aspirin for people with type 2 diabetes are finely balanced Published on 4 December 2018 doi: Daily aspirin reduced the risk of serious vascular events among people with diabetes, while increasing the risk of major bleeding to a similar extent. Aspirin prevented one person (...) that aspirin shouldn’t be prescribed to people with diabetes who do not have existing cardiovascular disease. Share your views on the research. Why was this study needed? Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the UK. It accounted for 152,465 deaths in 2016, of which 66,076 deaths were from coronary heart disease and 37,771 from stroke. Around 4 million people in the UK have diabetes, mostly type 2. Adults with diabetes are two to three times more likely to develop cardiovascular disease

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

13. Excess Burden of Mental Illness and Hospitalization in Young-Onset Type 2 Diabetes: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

Excess Burden of Mental Illness and Hospitalization in Young-Onset Type 2 Diabetes: A Population-Based Cohort Study. Background: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) increases hospitalization risk. Young-onset T2D (YOD) (defined as onset before age 40 years) is associated with excess morbidity and mortality, but its effect on hospitalizations is unknown. Objective: To determine hospitalization rates among persons with YOD and to examine the effect of age at onset on hospitalization risk. Design: Prospective (...) , 36.8% of YOD bed-days before age 40 years were due to mental illness. The adjusted rate ratios showed increased hospitalization in YOD versus usual-onset T2D (onset at age ≥40 years) (all-cause, 1.8 [95% CI, 1.7 to 2.0]; renal, 6.7 [CI, 4.2 to 10.6]; diabetes, 3.7 [CI, 3.0 to 4.6]; cardiovascular, 2.1 [CI, 1.8 to 2.5]; infection, 1.7 [CI, 1.4 to 2.1]; P < 0.001 for all). Models estimated that intensified risk factor control in YOD (hemoglobin A1c level <6.2%, systolic blood pressure <120

Annals of Internal Medicine2019

14. Type 2 diabetes: what's next after metformin?

Type 2 diabetes: what's next after metformin? Type 2 diabetes: what's next after metformin? | NPS MedicineWise 20 Years Of Helping Australians Make Better Decisions About Medicines, Medical Tests And Other Health Technologies. Log in Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google Signing you in Use another account OR Login Form Email Password Log in to NPS MedicineWise Forgot password Forgot password Email Send reset instructions Set new password Reset Password Password Set password Account exists We found (...) that match your past search terms. We’ll send you email alerts for articles that match these search terms: History Clear all to view your search history. Menu Breadcrumbs Type 2 diabetes: what's next after metformin? Type 2 diabetes: what's next after metformin? With a range of blood glucose-lowering medicines on the market, it can be hard to decide what to prescribe for patients needing more than metformin. Share Share to: Larger text Smaller text This program is funded by Boehringer Ingelheim Pty

National Prescribing Service Limited (Australia)2019

15. Ertugliflozin (Steglatro) - type 2 diabetes mellitus

Ertugliflozin (Steglatro) - type 2 diabetes mellitus 1 Published 14 January 2019 1 SMC2102 ertugliflozin 5mg, 15mg film-coated tablet (Steglatro®) Merck Sharp & Dohme 7 December 2018 The Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) has completed its assessment of the above product and advises NHS Boards and Area Drug and Therapeutic Committees (ADTCs) on its use in NHSScotland. The advice is summarised as follows: ADVICE: following a full submission ertugliflozin (Steglatro ® ) is accepted (...) for restricted use within NHSScotland. Indication under review: in adults aged 18 years and older with type 2 diabetes mellitus as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycaemic control: ? As monotherapy in patients for whom the use of metformin is considered inappropriate due to intolerance or contraindications. ? In addition to other medicinal products for the treatment of diabetes. SMC restriction: ertugliflozin is accepted for use as monotherapy and as add-on therapy. When used as monotherapy

Scottish Medicines Consortium2019

16. Semaglutide (Ozempic) - the treatment of adults with insufficiently controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) as an adjunct to diet and exercise

Semaglutide (Ozempic) - the treatment of adults with insufficiently controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) as an adjunct to diet and exercise 1 Published 14 January 2019 1 SMC2092 semaglutide 0.25mg, 0.5mg and 1mg solution for injection in pre-filled pen (Ozempic®) Novo Nordisk Ltd. 9 November 2018 (Issued 7 December 2018) The Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) has completed its assessment of the above product and advises NHS Boards and Area Drug and Therapeutic Committees (ADTCs) on its (...) use in NHSScotland. The advice is summarised as follows: ADVICE: following a full submission semaglutide (Ozempic ® ) is accepted for restricted use within NHSScotland. Indication under review: the treatment of adults with insufficiently controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) as an adjunct to diet and exercise: ? As monotherapy when metformin is considered inappropriate due to intolerance or contraindications ? In addition to other medicinal products for the treatment of diabetes. SMC

Scottish Medicines Consortium2019

17. Minimed 670g - for the management of type 1 diabetes mellitus

Minimed 670g - for the management of type 1 diabetes mellitus Search Page - Drug and Health Product Register Language selection Search and menus Search Search website Search Topics menu You are here: Summary Basis of Decision - - Health Canada Summary Basis of Decision (SBD) for Contact: Summary Basis of Decision (SBD) Summary basis of decision (SBD) documents provide information related to the original authorization of a product. The for the is located below. Updated: The following table (...) describes post-licensing activity for the . For more information on the type of information found in PLATs, please refer to the For additional information about the medical device application process, refer to the . Licence Number: Post-Licensing Activity Table (PLAT) Activity/Application Type, Application Number Date Submitted Decision and Date Summary of Activities 1 What was approved? Application Milestones: Application Milestone Date For additional information about the medical device application

Health Canada - Drug and Health Product Register2019

18. Second-line Drug Therapy for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

Second-line Drug Therapy for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Second-line drug therapy for patients with Type 2 Diabetes A Consensus Statement from the Kaiser Permanente National Integrated Cardiovascular Health (ICVH) Work Group November 19, 2018 The Kaiser Permanente ICVH group is aware of the new treatment recommendations published in the American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) Management of Hyperglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes 2018 Consensus Report. The ADA places newer diabetic medications (...) (including insulin) are evidence-based, of established efficacy, and are clinically appropriate in our patients with type 2 diabetes. We have commissioned an independent group to do a high-quality systematic review of these newer diabetic medications with results forthcoming within the next month. The National KP Diabetes recommendations will be formally updated following this comprehensive review of the literature and inter-regional vetting with clinical leads and National Guideline Directors (NGD

Kaiser Permanente National Guideline Program2019

19. Cardiovascular Benefits and Harms of Step Therapy in the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes in Adults with and without Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease

Cardiovascular Benefits and Harms of Step Therapy in the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes in Adults with and without Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Cardiovascular Benefits and Harms of Step Therapy in the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes in Adults with and without Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Kaiser Permanente Research Affiliates Evidence-based Practice Center Corinne Evans, MPP; Nicholas Emptage, MAE; Megan Rushkin, MPH; and Jennifer S. Lin, MD, MCR Summary Question 1. In persons (...) with type 2 diabetes with or without known atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) who cannot attain adequate glucose control with metformin, what is the benefit of GLP-1 agonists or SGLT-2 inhibitors on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality? • Evidence of benefit in persons with known ASCVD on cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes, CVD mortality and all-cause mortality (ACM) o Based on limited evidence in persons without ASCVD, no evidence of benefit on CVD outcomes • Presumed class effect of benefit

Kaiser Permanente National Guideline Program2019

20. Cardiovascular Risk Reduction in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease

Cardiovascular Risk Reduction in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease EXPERT CONSENSUS DECISION PATHWAY 2018 ACC Expert Consensus Decision Pathway on Novel Therapies for Cardiovascular Risk Reduction in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease A Report of the American College of Cardiology Task Force on Expert Consensus Decision Pathways Endorsed by the American Diabetes Association Writing Committee Sandeep R. Das, MD, MPH (...) citedasfollows:Das SR,EverettBM,BirtcherKK,BrownJM,CefaluWT,Januzzi JL Jr, Rastogi Kalyani R, Kosiborod M, Magwire ML, Morris PB, Sperling LS. 2018 ACC expert consensus decision pathway on novel therapies for car- diovascular risk reduction in patients with type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Task Force on Expert Consensus Decision Pathways. J Am Coll Cardiol 2018;XX:XXX–XXX. Copies:Thisdocumentisavailableonthewebsite oftheAmericanCollegeof

American College of Cardiology2019