Latest & greatest articles for traumatic brain injury

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on traumatic brain injury or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on traumatic brain injury and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for traumatic brain injury

61. A Probabilistic Matching Approach to Link De-identified Data from a Trauma Registry and a Traumatic Brain Injury Model System Center Full Text available with Trip Pro

A Probabilistic Matching Approach to Link De-identified Data from a Trauma Registry and a Traumatic Brain Injury Model System Center There is no civilian traumatic brain injury database that captures patients in all settings of the care continuum. The linkage of such databases would yield valuable insight into possible care interventions. Thus, the objective of this article is to describe the creation of an algorithm used to link the Traumatic Brain Injury Model System (TBIMS) to trauma data (...) . It had a sensitivity of 88% and a positive predictive value of 99%. The validation subset consisted of 120 patients and had a sensitivity of 83% and a positive predictive value of 99%.The probabilistic linkage algorithm can accurately link TBIMS data across systems of trauma care. Future studies can use this database to answer meaningful research questions regarding the long-term impact of the acute trauma complex on health care utilization and recovery across the care continuum in traumatic brain

2017 American journal of physical medicine & rehabilitation

62. Beta Blockers After Traumatic Brain Injury

Beta Blockers After Traumatic Brain Injury Beta-blockers and Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Revie... : Annals of Surgery You may be trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page. Login No user account? Lippincott Journals Subscribers , use your username or email along with your password to log in. Remember me on this computer Register for a free account Registered users can save articles, searches, and manage email alerts. All (...) and Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Revie... If you're not a subscriber, you can: You can read the full text of this article if you: Institutional members Email to a Colleague Colleague's E-mail is Invalid Your Name: (optional) Your Email: Colleague's Email: Separate multiple e-mails with a (;). Message: Thought you might appreciate this item(s) I saw at Annals of Surgery. Send a copy to your email Your message has been successfully sent to your colleague. Some error has occurred while processing your

2017 Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma

63. Randomised controlled trial: Decompressive craniectomy for severe traumatic brain injury reduces mortality but increases survival with severe disability

disability Article Text Therapeutics/Prevention Randomised controlled trial Decompressive craniectomy for severe traumatic brain injury reduces mortality but increases survival with severe disability Stephen Honeybul Statistics from Altmetric.com Commentary on: Hutchinson PJ , Kolias AG , Timofeev IS , et al. , RESCUEicp Trial Collaborators . Trial of Decompressive Craniectomy for Traumatic Intracranial Hypertension . Context There is little doubt that decompressive craniectomy can reduce mortality (...) Randomised controlled trial: Decompressive craniectomy for severe traumatic brain injury reduces mortality but increases survival with severe disability Decompressive craniectomy for severe traumatic brain injury reduces mortality but increases survival with severe disability | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies

2017 Evidence-Based Medicine

64. Rehabilitation of adults with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury

Rehabilitation of adults with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury Home // Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation Toggle navigation NAVIGATION > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Clinical Practice Guideline For the rehabilitation of Adults with Moderate to Severe TBI WHAT'S NEW February 3, 2020 : The patient version of the guideline is now available for download in PDF format. This 15-page handbook describes the rehabilitation of adults with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (...) in each section of the guidelines. The ''Key indicators'' tab proposes examples of indicators that can be used to monitor the implementation of specific recommendations in each section of the guidelines. Downloadable PDF document with all and are also available.-- SECTION 1: Components of the Optimal TBI Rehabilitation System SECTION 2: Assessment and Rehabilitation of Brain Injury Sequelae Search By Keyword: and / or SEARCH BY TAG: Assessment Management Acute Inpatient Outpatient/ Community Coping

2017 Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation

65. Sertraline for Preventing Mood Disorders Following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Clinical Trial. (Abstract)

Sertraline for Preventing Mood Disorders Following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Prevention is more effective than treatment to decrease the burden of significant medical conditions such as depressive disorders, a major cause of disability worldwide. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a candidate for selective strategies to prevent depression given the incidence, prevalence, and functional effect of depression that occurs after TBI.To assess the efficacy of sertraline

2016 EvidenceUpdates

66. Clinical practice guideline for the rehabilitation of adults with moderate to severe Traumatic Brain Injury

Clinical practice guideline for the rehabilitation of adults with moderate to severe Traumatic Brain Injury Brain Injury Guidelines - Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation (ONF) Welcome to braininjuryguidelines.org INESSS-ONF CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE FOR THE REHABILITATION OF ADULTS WITH MODERATE TO SEVERE TBI GUIDELINE FOR CONCUSSION/MILD TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY & PERSISTENT SYMPTOMS 3RD EDITION, FOR ADULTS OVER 18 YEARS OF AGE

2016 CPG Infobase

67. Management of severe traumatic brain injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome using pumped extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal device Full Text available with Trip Pro

Management of severe traumatic brain injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome using pumped extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal device The effects of a high carbon dioxide on cerebral perfusion and intracranial pressure are well known. We report the case of a man who presented after with a severe traumatic brain injury including intracranial and extradural haemorrhage. Neuroprotective ventilation was impossible without supramaximal tidal volumes due to a combination of chest trauma (...) and severe bronchospasm. A pump driven Novalung iLA active® system was inserted to achieve both ARDSnet ventilation and a lowering of intracranial pressure. To our knowledge, this is the first time this system has been used to this effect. The patient went on to make a good recovery.

2016 Journal of the Intensive Care Society

68. Delayed massive epistaxis from traumatic intracranial aneurysm after blunt facial injury Full Text available with Trip Pro

Delayed massive epistaxis from traumatic intracranial aneurysm after blunt facial injury Traumatic intracranial aneurysm following blunt head injury is uncommon but can be induced by extension of skull base fracture and causes unexpected hemorrhagic complications. We present two cases of traumatic intracranial aneurysm in the paraclinoid area that was revealed by delayed massive epistaxis. Lack of initial neurological deficits omitted screening for cerebrovascular injury.Internal trapping (...) was carried out using endovascular techniques in both cases, with extracranial-intracranial bypass in one case. No recurrent bleeding occurred in either case.To prevent unexpected delayed life-threatening hemorrhagic accidents, careful assessment of skull-base fracture is prerequisite, even in cases of mild facial injury.

2016 Acute medicine & surgery

69. Randomised, waiting list controlled trial of cognitive-behavioural therapy for persistent postconcussional symptoms after predominantly mild-moderate traumatic brain injury Full Text available with Trip Pro

Randomised, waiting list controlled trial of cognitive-behavioural therapy for persistent postconcussional symptoms after predominantly mild-moderate traumatic brain injury Persistent postconcussional symptoms (PCS) can be a source of distress and disability following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Such symptoms have been viewed as difficult to treat but may be amenable to psychological approaches such as cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT).To evaluate the effectiveness of a 12-session (...) individualised, formulation-based CBT programme.Two-centre randomised waiting list controlled trial with 46 adults with persistent PCS after predominantly mild-to-moderate TBI (52% with post-traumatic amnesia (PTA)≤24 hours), but including some with severe TBIs (20% with PTA>7 days).Improvements associated with CBT were found on the primary outcome measures relating to quality of life (using the Quality of Life Assessment Schedule and the Brain Injury Community Rehabilitation Outcome Scale). Treatment

2016 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

70. Vitamin K, fresh frozen plasma, and platelet transfusion used to arrest progression of intracranial hemorrhage after traumatic brain injury in a patient taking anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents Full Text available with Trip Pro

Vitamin K, fresh frozen plasma, and platelet transfusion used to arrest progression of intracranial hemorrhage after traumatic brain injury in a patient taking anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents An 89-year-old man fell from stairs and sustained head trauma. He was taking warfarin and aspirin. Upon arrival at our hospital, his Glasgow Coma Scale score was 14. Initial head computed tomography showed small acute subdural hematoma. We immediately administered vitamin K and ordered fresh-frozen (...) progression of traumatic intracranial hemorrhages in this patient taking anticoagulant/antiplatelet agents and may have averted brain surgery.

2016 Acute medicine & surgery

71. Hypothermia for Intracranial Hypertension after Traumatic Brain Injury. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Hypothermia for Intracranial Hypertension after Traumatic Brain Injury. 27050212 2016 04 07 2018 12 02 1533-4406 374 14 2016 04 07 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Hypothermia for Intracranial Hypertension after Traumatic Brain Injury. 1385 10.1056/NEJMc1600339 Andrews Peter J D PJ Harris Bridget A BA Murray Gordon D GD eng Letter Comment United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 AIM IM N Engl J Med. 2015 Dec 17;373(25):2403-12 26444221 N Engl J Med. 2016 Apr 7;374(14 (...) ):1383-4 27050213 N Engl J Med. 2016 Apr 7;374(14):1384 27050214 N Engl J Med. 2016 Apr 7;374(14):1384 27050215 Brain Injuries complications Humans Hypothermia, Induced Intracranial Hypertension therapy 2016 4 7 6 0 2016 4 7 6 0 2016 4 8 6 0 ppublish 27050212 10.1056/NEJMc1600339 10.1056/NEJMc1600339#SA4

2016 NEJM

72. Hypothermia for Intracranial Hypertension after Traumatic Brain Injury. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Hypothermia for Intracranial Hypertension after Traumatic Brain Injury. 27050213 2016 04 07 2018 12 02 1533-4406 374 14 2016 04 07 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Hypothermia for Intracranial Hypertension after Traumatic Brain Injury. 1383-4 10.1056/NEJMc1600339 O'Leary Ronan R Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom. Hutchinson Peter J A PJ University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom dkm13@wbic.cam.ac.uk. Menon David D University of Cambridge, Cambridge (...) , United Kingdom dkm13@wbic.cam.ac.uk. eng Letter Comment United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 AIM IM N Engl J Med. 2015 Dec 17;373(25):2403-12 26444221 N Engl J Med. 2016 Apr 7;374(14):1385 27050212 Brain Injuries complications Humans Hypothermia, Induced Intracranial Hypertension therapy 2016 4 7 6 0 2016 4 7 6 0 2016 4 8 6 0 ppublish 27050213 10.1056/NEJMc1600339 10.1056/NEJMc1600339#SA1

2016 NEJM

73. Hypothermia for Intracranial Hypertension after Traumatic Brain Injury. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Hypothermia for Intracranial Hypertension after Traumatic Brain Injury. 27050214 2016 04 07 2018 12 02 1533-4406 374 14 2016 04 07 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Hypothermia for Intracranial Hypertension after Traumatic Brain Injury. 1384 10.1056/NEJMc1600339 Lazaridis Christos C Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX lazaridi@bcm.edu. eng Letter Comment United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 AIM IM N Engl J Med. 2015 Dec 17;373(25):2403-12 26444221 N Engl J Med (...) . 2016 Apr 7;374(14):1385 27050212 Brain Injuries complications Humans Hypothermia, Induced Intracranial Hypertension therapy 2016 4 7 6 0 2016 4 7 6 0 2016 4 8 6 0 ppublish 27050214 10.1056/NEJMc1600339 10.1056/NEJMc1600339#SA2

2016 NEJM

74. Hypothermia for Intracranial Hypertension after Traumatic Brain Injury. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Hypothermia for Intracranial Hypertension after Traumatic Brain Injury. 27050215 2016 04 07 2018 12 02 1533-4406 374 14 2016 04 07 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Hypothermia for Intracranial Hypertension after Traumatic Brain Injury. 1384 10.1056/NEJMc1600339 Cooper D James DJ Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia jamie.cooper@monash.edu. Nichol Alistair A Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia jamie.cooper@monash.edu. Presneill Jeffrey J Monash University (...) , Melbourne, VIC, Australia jamie.cooper@monash.edu. eng Letter Comment United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 AIM IM N Engl J Med. 2015 Dec 17;373(25):2403-12 26444221 N Engl J Med. 2016 Apr 7;374(14):1385 27050212 Brain Injuries complications Humans Hypothermia, Induced Intracranial Hypertension therapy 2016 4 7 6 0 2016 4 7 6 0 2016 4 8 6 0 ppublish 27050215 10.1056/NEJMc1600339 10.1056/NEJMc1600339#SA3

2016 NEJM

75. Employment Interventions for Return to Work in Working Aged Adults Following Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Systematic Review Full Text available with Trip Pro

Employment Interventions for Return to Work in Working Aged Adults Following Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Systematic Review Employment Interventions for Return to Work in Working Aged Adults Following Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Systematic Review - Graham - 2016 - Campbell Systematic Reviews - Wiley Online Library By continuing to browse this site, you agree to its use of cookies as described in our . Search within Search term Search term SYSTEMATIC REVIEW Open Access Employment (...) Interventions for Return to Work in Working Aged Adults Following Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Systematic Review Corresponding Author E-mail address: Corresponding author Carolyn W. Graham Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Virginia Commonwealth University PO Box 843038 Richmond, VA 23237 USA E‐mail: Corresponding Author E-mail address: Corresponding author Carolyn W. Graham Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Virginia Commonwealth University PO Box 843038 Richmond, VA 23237

2016 Campbell Collaboration

76. Guidelines for the Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (4th edition)

for management decisions, may be considered to reduce mortality and improve outcomes at 3 and 6 mo post-injury. a AVDO 2 , arteriovenous oxygen content difference; CPP, cerebral perfusion pressure; CT, computed tomography; GCS, Glasgow Coma Scale; ICP, intracranial pressure; SBP, systolic blood pressure; TBI, traumatic brain injury. b Bold: New or revised recommendations. TABLE 2. Updated Monitoring Recommendations , Topic Recommendations Intracranial pressure monitoring Level IIB • Management of severe TBI (...) mortality. Advanced cerebral monitoring Level III • Jugular bulb monitoring of AVDO 2 , as a source of information for management decisions, may be considered to reduce mortality and improve outcomes at 3 and 6 mo post-injury. a AVDO 2 , arteriovenous oxygen content difference; CPP, cerebral perfusion pressure; CT, computed tomography; GCS, Glasgow Coma Scale; ICP, intracranial pressure; SBP, systolic blood pressure; TBI, traumatic brain injury. b Bold: New or revised recommendations. TABLE 3. Updated

2016 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

77. Management of Concussion-mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)

Management of Concussion-mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) VA/DoD CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF CONCUSSION-MILD TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY Department of Veterans Affairs Department of Defense QUALIFYING STATEMENTS The Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense guidelines are based upon the best information available at the time of publication. They are designed to provide information and assist decision making. They are not intended to define a standard (...) and/or therapeutic interventions within these guidelines does not guarantee coverage of civilian sector care. Additional information on current TRICARE benefits may be found at www.tricare.mil or by contacting your regional TRICARE Managed Care Support Contractor. Version 2.0 – 2016 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Concussion-mild Traumatic Brain Injury February 2016 Page 2 of 133 Prepared by: The Management of Concussion-mild Traumatic Brain Injury Working Group With support from

2016 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

78. Does Mannitol Reduce Mortality From Traumatic Brain Injury?

in cerebral blood ?ow and oxygenation. 6 The Brain Trauma Foundation Guidelines Task Force provided a level II recommen- dation (moderate clinical cer- tainty) for administering mannitol in cases of elevated intracranial pressure. 7 A recent survey re- ported that a majority of Canadian emergency physicians in one province use mannitol for pa- tients with severe traumatic brain injury in accordance with physical examination ?ndings or computed tomography evidence ofherniation. 8 Despite mannitol’s long (...) % mannitol vs placebo 1.75 (0.48–6.38) RR, Relative risk; CI, con?dence interval; TBI, traumatic brain injury; GCS, Glasgow Coma Scale; ICP, intracranial pressure. METHODS DATA SOURCES TheauthorssearchedtheCochrane InjuriesGroupSpecializedRegister, CENTRAL,MEDLINE,EMBASE, PubMed,ISIWebofScience,and ConferenceProceedingsCitation IndexfrominceptionuntilApril 2009.Thereferencelistsofrelevant articleswerealsoreviewedandthe ?rstauthorofselectedarticleswas contactedforassistancewith

2016 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

79. Urban/Rural disparities in Oregon pediatric traumatic brain injury Full Text available with Trip Pro

Urban/Rural disparities in Oregon pediatric traumatic brain injury Traumatic brain injury (TBI) greatly contributes to morbidity and mortality in the pediatric population. We examined potential urban/rural disparities in mortality amongst Oregon pediatric patients with TBI treated in trauma hospitals.We conducted a retrospective study of children ages 0-19 using the Oregon Trauma Registry for years 2009-2012. Geographic location of injury was classified using the National Center for Health (...) Statistics Urban/Rural Classification Scheme. Incidence rates were calculated using Census data for denominators. Associations between urban/rural injury location and mortality were assessed using multivariable logistic regression, controlling for potential confounders. Generalized estimating equations were used to help account for clustering of data within hospitals.Of 2794 pediatric patients with TBI, 46.6 % were injured in large metropolitan locations, 24.8 % in medium/small metropolitan locations

2015 Injury epidemiology

80. Hypothermia for Traumatic Brain Injury in Children-A Phase II Randomized Controlled Trial

Hypothermia for Traumatic Brain Injury in Children-A Phase II Randomized Controlled Trial PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2015 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club