Latest & greatest articles for spine rehabilitation

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on spine rehabilitation and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Top results for spine rehabilitation

1. Pre-operative rehabilitation in patients with degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine undergoing spinal surgery: a systematic review

Pre-operative rehabilitation in patients with degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine undergoing spinal surgery: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne

2017 PROSPERO

2. Surgical stabilisation of the spine compared with a programme of intensive rehabilitation for the management of patients with chronic low back pain: cost utility analysis based on a randomised controlled trial

Surgical stabilisation of the spine compared with a programme of intensive rehabilitation for the management of patients with chronic low back pain: cost utility analysis based on a randomised controlled trial Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2005 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

3. Surgical stabilisation of the spine compared with a programme of intensive rehabilitation for the management of patients with chronic low back pain: cost utility analysis based on a randomised controlled trial. (Full text)

Surgical stabilisation of the spine compared with a programme of intensive rehabilitation for the management of patients with chronic low back pain: cost utility analysis based on a randomised controlled trial. To determine whether, from a health provider and patient perspective, surgical stabilisation of the spine is cost effective when compared with an intensive programme of rehabilitation in patients with chronic low back pain.Economic evaluation alongside a pragmatic randomised controlled (...) pounds sterling to 4291 pounds sterling). Mean QALYs over the trial period were 1.004 (SD 0.405) in the surgery group and 0.936 (SD 0.431) in the intensive rehabilitation group, giving a non-significant difference of 0.068 (-0.020 to 0.156). The incremental cost effectiveness ratio was estimated to be 48,588 pounds sterling per QALY gained (- 279,883 pounds sterling to 372,406 pounds sterling).Two year follow-up data show that surgical stabilisation of the spine may not be a cost effective use

2005 BMJ Controlled trial quality: predicted high

4. Randomised controlled trial to compare surgical stabilisation of the lumbar spine with an intensive rehabilitation programme for patients with chronic low back pain: the MRC spine stabilisation trial. (Full text)

Randomised controlled trial to compare surgical stabilisation of the lumbar spine with an intensive rehabilitation programme for patients with chronic low back pain: the MRC spine stabilisation trial. To assess the clinical effectiveness of surgical stabilisation (spinal fusion) compared with intensive rehabilitation for patients with chronic low back pain.Multicentre randomised controlled trial.15 secondary care orthopaedic and rehabilitation centres across the United Kingdom.349 participants (...) aged 18-55 with chronic low back pain of at least one year's duration who were considered candidates for spinal fusion.Lumbar spine fusion or an intensive rehabilitation programme based on principles of cognitive behaviour therapy.The primary outcomes were the Oswestry disability index and the shuttle walking test measured at baseline and two years after randomisation. The SF-36 instrument was used as a secondary outcome measure.176 participants were assigned to surgery and 173 to rehabilitation

2005 BMJ Controlled trial quality: predicted high