Latest & greatest articles for sedation

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Top results for sedation

161. A cost-effectiveness analysis of propofol versus midazolam for procedural sedation in the emergency department

A cost-effectiveness analysis of propofol versus midazolam for procedural sedation in the emergency department 18211311 2008 01 23 2008 05 29 2013 11 21 1553-2712 15 1 2008 Jan Academic emergency medicine : official journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Acad Emerg Med A cost-effectiveness analysis of propofol versus midazolam for procedural sedation in the emergency department. 32-9 10.1111/j.1553-2712.2007.00023.x To determine the incremental cost-effectiveness of using (...) propofol versus midazolam for procedural sedation (PS) in adults in the emergency department (ED). The authors conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis from the perspective of the health care provider. The primary outcome was the incremental cost (or savings) to achieve one additional successful sedation with propofol compared to midazolam. A decision model was developed in which the clinical effectiveness and cost of a PS strategy using either agent was estimated. The authors derived estimates

EvidenceUpdates2008

162. Continuous deep sedation for patients nearing death in the Netherlands: descriptive study.

Continuous deep sedation for patients nearing death in the Netherlands: descriptive study. OBJECTIVES: To study the practice of continuous deep sedation in 2005 in the Netherlands and compare it with findings from 2001. DESIGN: Questionnaire study about random samples of deaths reported to a central death registry in 2005 and 2001. SETTING: Nationwide physician study in the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Reporting physicians received a questionnaire about the medical decisions that preceded (...) the patient's death; 78% (n=6860) responded in 2005 and 74% (n=5617) in 2001. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Characteristics of continuous deep sedation (attending physician, types of patients, drugs used, duration, estimated effect on shortening life, palliative consultation). Requests for euthanasia. RESULTS: The use of continuous deep sedation increased from 5.6% (95% confidence interval 5.0% to 6.2%) of deaths in 2001 to 7.1% (6.5% to 7.6%) in 2005, mostly in patients treated by general practitioners

BMJ2008 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

163. A cost-effectiveness analysis of propofol versus midazolam for procedural sedation in the emergency department

A cost-effectiveness analysis of propofol versus midazolam for procedural sedation in the emergency department A cost-effectiveness analysis of propofol versus midazolam for procedural sedation in the emergency department A cost-effectiveness analysis of propofol versus midazolam for procedural sedation in the emergency department Hohl C M, Nosyk B, Sadatsafavi M, Anis A H Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each (...) abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary This study examined the cost-effectiveness of using propofol (PRO) in comparison with midazolam (MID) for procedural sedation in adults in the emergency department. The authors concluded that the use of PRO was an effective and cost-saving alternative to MID from the perspective of the health service provider

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2008

165. Effect of music on procedure time and sedation during colonoscopy: a meta-analysis

Effect of music on procedure time and sedation during colonoscopy: a meta-analysis Effect of music on procedure time and sedation during colonoscopy: a meta-analysis Effect of music on procedure time and sedation during colonoscopy: a meta-analysis Tam W W, Wong E L, Twinn S F CRD summary This review concluded that listening to music was effective in reducing procedure time and amount of sedation used during colonoscopy, and should be promoted. The recommendation for promoting listening (...) to music during colonoscopy should be regarded with some caution because the reduction in procedure time was fairly small and the analysis of the amount of sedation used had some limitations. Authors' objectives To assess the effectiveness of music in reducing procedure time and amount of sedation used during colonoscopy. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, AMED and ACP Journal Club were searched up to March 2007 for English-language papers. Search terms

DARE.2008

166. Intraarticular lidocaine versus intravenous procedural sedation with narcotics and benzodiazepines for reduction of the dislocated shoulder: a systematic review

Intraarticular lidocaine versus intravenous procedural sedation with narcotics and benzodiazepines for reduction of the dislocated shoulder: a systematic review Intraarticular lidocaine versus intravenous procedural sedation with narcotics and benzodiazepines for reduction of the dislocated shoulder: a systematic review Intraarticular lidocaine versus intravenous procedural sedation with narcotics and benzodiazepines for reduction of the dislocated shoulder: a systematic review Fitch RW, Kuhn (...) JE CRD summary This review found that the use of intra-articular lidocaine for reduction of the dislocated shoulder resulted in fewer complications and less time spent in the emergency department when compared with opiate/benzodiazepine combinations for intravenous sedation. The increasing use of newer short-acting sedatives for sedation brings into question the applicability of this study to modern practice. Authors' objectives To determine if intra-articular lidocaine was as effective

DARE.2008

167. Short-acting agents for procedural sedation and analgesia in Canadian emergency departments: a review of clinical outcomes and economic evaluation

Short-acting agents for procedural sedation and analgesia in Canadian emergency departments: a review of clinical outcomes and economic evaluation Short-acting agents for procedural sedation and analgesia in Canadian emergency departments: a review of clinical outcomes and economic evaluation Short-acting agents for procedural sedation and analgesia in Canadian emergency departments: a review of clinical outcomes and economic evaluation Bond K, Fassbender K, Karkhaneh M, Spooner C, Horton J (...) , Sivilotti MLA, Campbell SG, Vandermeer B, Tjosvold L, Seal R, Rowe BH Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Bond K, Fassbender K, Karkhaneh M, Spooner C, Horton J, Sivilotti MLA, Campbell SG, Vandermeer B, Tjosvold L, Seal R, Rowe BH. Short-acting agents for procedural sedation and analgesia in Canadian emergency departments: a review

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2008

168. The use of propofol for medium and long-term sedation in critically ill adult patients: a meta-analysis

The use of propofol for medium and long-term sedation in critically ill adult patients: a meta-analysis The use of propofol for medium and long-term sedation in critically ill adult patients: a meta-analysis The use of propofol for medium and long-term sedation in critically ill adult patients: a meta-analysis Ho KM, Ng JY CRD summary The authors concluded that using propofol for prolonged sedation in critically ill patients appeared to be safe and may reduce duration of mechanical (...) ventilation. It reduced the length of intensive care unit stay when compared to long acting benzodiazepines, but not when compared to midazolam. The authors' conclusions reflect the evidence presented and are likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effect of using propofol for medium-term and long-term sedation in critically ill adult patients. Searching The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2007 issue 3), EMBASE (January 1990 to December 2007) and MEDLINE (1966 to December

DARE.2008

169. Adverse events associated with ketamine for procedural sedation in adults

Adverse events associated with ketamine for procedural sedation in adults Adverse events associated with ketamine for procedural sedation in adults Adverse events associated with ketamine for procedural sedation in adults Strayer RJ, Nelson LS CRD summary The review concluded that when ketamine was used for procedural sedation in adults, cardiorespiratory adverse events were rare but dysphoric emergence phenomena occurred in 10% to 20% patients and there was a likelihood of airway obstruction (...) . The reliability of the authors’ conclusions is uncertain due to review process limitations and uncertain quality and design of the many included studies. Authors' objectives To evaluate the safety of the use of ketamine for procedural sedation in adults. Searching PubMed, EMBASE, TOXNET (to May 2006) and The Cochrane Library were searched for publications in English, Spanish, Russian, French, Portuguese and German; search terms were reported. Australian Adverse Drug Reactions Bulletin, European Public

DARE.2008

170. Safety and clinical effectiveness of midazolam versus propofol for procedural sedation in the emergency department: a systematic review

Safety and clinical effectiveness of midazolam versus propofol for procedural sedation in the emergency department: a systematic review Safety and clinical effectiveness of midazolam versus propofol for procedural sedation in the emergency department: a systematic review Safety and clinical effectiveness of midazolam versus propofol for procedural sedation in the emergency department: a systematic review Hohl CM, Sadatsafavi M, Nosyk B, Anis AH CRD summary This review concluded that midazolam (...) and propofol were equally safe and effective for procedural sedation of adults in the emergency department, and that use of one agent over the other should be guided by resource utilisation and treatment costs. The authors’ conclusions appeared to reflect the evidence, but the limitations with the included studies should be borne in mind. Authors' objectives To compare the safety and effectiveness of midazolam and/or propofol for procedural sedation in adults in the emergency department. Searching PubMed

DARE.2008

171. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials of moderate sedation for routine endoscopic procedures

A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials of moderate sedation for routine endoscopic procedures A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials of moderate sedation for routine endoscopic procedures A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials of moderate sedation for routine endoscopic procedures McQuaid K R, Laine L CRD summary This review concluded that moderate sedation provided high levels of satisfaction (...) and low risk of serious adverse events in patients undergoing esphagogastroduodenoscopy or colonoscopy. Midazolam-based regiments had longer sedation and recovery times than propofol. The search was limited, studies were generally poor quality and the appropriateness of the synthesis was unclear. Thus, the reliability of the conclusions was unclear. Authors' objectives To compare the efficacy, safety and efficiency of agents used for moderate sedation in esphagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) or colonoscopy

DARE.2008

172. Protocol-directed sedation did not reduce duration of mechanical ventilation or hospital stay in ICU patients

Protocol-directed sedation did not reduce duration of mechanical ventilation or hospital stay in ICU patients Protocol-directed sedation did not reduce duration of mechanical ventilation or hospital stay in ICU patients | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in via your Society Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user (...) name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in via your Society Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Protocol-directed sedation did not reduce duration of mechanical ventilation or hospital stay in ICU patients Article Text Quality improvement Protocol-directed sedation did not reduce duration of mechanical ventilation or hospital stay

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2008

173. A randomized trial of protocol-directed sedation management for mechanical ventilation in an Australian intensive care unit

A randomized trial of protocol-directed sedation management for mechanical ventilation in an Australian intensive care unit 18434914 2008 05 01 2008 06 04 2008 11 17 1530-0293 36 5 2008 May Critical care medicine Crit. Care Med. A randomized trial of protocol-directed sedation management for mechanical ventilation in an Australian intensive care unit. 1444-50 10.1097/CCM.0b013e318168f82d To compare protocol-directed sedation management with traditional non-protocol-directed practice (...) in mechanically ventilated patients. Randomized, controlled trial. General intensive care unit (24 beds) in an Australian metropolitan teaching hospital. Adult, mechanically ventilated patients (n = 312). Patients were randomly assigned to receive sedation directed by formal guidelines (protocol group, n = 153) or usual local clinical practice (control, n = 159). The median (95% confidence interval) duration of ventilation was 79 hrs (56-93 hrs) for patients in the protocol group compared with 58 hrs (44-78

EvidenceUpdates2008

174. Efficacy and safety of a paired sedation and ventilator weaning protocol for mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care (Awakening and Breathing Controlled trial): a randomised controlled trial.

Efficacy and safety of a paired sedation and ventilator weaning protocol for mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care (Awakening and Breathing Controlled trial): a randomised controlled trial. 18191684 2008 01 14 2008 01 29 2015 06 16 1474-547X 371 9607 2008 Jan 12 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Efficacy and safety of a paired sedation and ventilator weaning protocol for mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care (Awakening and Breathing Controlled trial): a randomised (...) controlled trial. 126-34 10.1016/S0140-6736(08)60105-1 Approaches to removal of sedation and mechanical ventilation for critically ill patients vary widely. Our aim was to assess a protocol that paired spontaneous awakening trials (SATs)-ie, daily interruption of sedatives-with spontaneous breathing trials (SBTs). In four tertiary-care hospitals, we randomly assigned 336 mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care to management with a daily SAT followed by an SBT (intervention group; n=168

Lancet2008

175. Midazolam or ketamine for procedural sedation of children in the emergency department

Midazolam or ketamine for procedural sedation of children in the emergency department BestBets: Midazolam or ketamine for procedural sedation of children in the emergency department Midazolam or ketamine for procedural sedation of children in the emergency department Report By: Andrew Munro - Specialist in Emergency Medicine FACEM Search checked by Ian Machonochie - Consultant in Paediatric Emergency Medicine Institution: Coffs Harbour Base Hospital, NSW, Australia Date Submitted: 28th May 2003 (...) Date Completed: 27th July 2007 Last Modified: 18th June 2007 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [children needing painful procedures in the emergency department] is [ midazolam or ketamine] [ safer and more effective at achieving conscious sedation]? Clinical Scenario A mother brings her five year old son to the Emergency Department (ED) with a deep scalp laceration having fallen onto the corner of a coffee table. The wound requires sutures. For various reasons the option

BestBETS2007

176. Low-dose ketamine in addition to propofol for procedural sedation and analgesia in the emergency department

Low-dose ketamine in addition to propofol for procedural sedation and analgesia in the emergency department Low-dose ketamine in addition to propofol for procedural sedation and analgesia in the emergency department Low-dose ketamine in addition to propofol for procedural sedation and analgesia in the emergency department Loh G, Dalen D CRD summary This review concluded that there is insufficient evidence to recommend the routine use of low-dose ketamine combined with propofol for procedural (...) sedation in the emergency department setting. Although the review has a number of weaknesses, this conclusion is appropriate. Authors' objectives To evaluate the safety and efficacy of low-dose intravenous ketamine with intravenous propofol for sedation and analgesia during emergency department procedures. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, BioMed Central, the Cochrane Library, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts and Google Scholar were searched from inception to February 2007; key search terms were

DARE.2007

177. Does music reduce anxiety during invasive procedures with procedural sedation: an integrative research review

Does music reduce anxiety during invasive procedures with procedural sedation: an integrative research review Does music reduce anxiety during invasive procedures with procedural sedation: an integrative research review Does music reduce anxiety during invasive procedures with procedural sedation: an integrative research review Vanderboom T CRD summary The review concluded that music therapy may be effective in lowering blood pressure and reducing medication requirements for participants who (...) underwent invasive procedures. Weak results and differences between studies made the author recommend further research. The reliability of the author's cautious conclusions are uncertain due to lack of reporting of review methods and details of individual studies including results. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of music therapy in reducing anxiety during invasive procedures with procedural sedation. Searching CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, Expanded Academic Index, Proquest, PsycINFO

DARE.2007

178. Effect of sedation with dexmedetomidine vs lorazepam on acute brain dysfunction in mechanically ventilated patients: the MENDS randomized controlled trial

Effect of sedation with dexmedetomidine vs lorazepam on acute brain dysfunction in mechanically ventilated patients: the MENDS randomized controlled trial Effect of sedation with dexmedetomidine vs lorazepam on acute brain dysfunction in mechanically ventilated patients: the MENDS randomized controlled trial Effect of sedation with dexmedetomidine vs lorazepam on acute brain dysfunction in mechanically ventilated patients: the MENDS randomized controlled trial Pandharipande PP, Pun BT, Herr DL (...) of dexmedetomidine for sedation of adult medical and surgical intensive care unit patients who required mechanical ventilation for more than 24 hours. The authors concluded that compared with lorazepam, dexmedetomidine reduced duration of delirium and coma and increased time at the targeted level of sedation at no added cost. Reporting and methodology were satisfactory. The authors' conclusions appear appropriate but readers should take into account the limited generalisability and lack of uncertainty assessment

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2007

180. Procedural sedation for cardioversion

Procedural sedation for cardioversion BestBets: Procedural Sedation for Cardioversion Procedural Sedation for Cardioversion Report By: Jeremy Wood, MD - Senior Resident Search checked by Craig Ferguson - Clinical Research Fellow Institution: Michigan State University/MERC Emergency Medicine Residency Program Date Submitted: 26th June 2005 Date Completed: 8th December 2006 Last Modified: 20th October 2006 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [patients with atrial fibrillation, atrial (...) flutter, or paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia requiring electrical cardioversion] are [there medications superior in safety and efficacy] in [achieving procedural sedation]? Clinical Scenario An 38 year old male arrives in your emergency department complaining of palpitations and feels slightly light headed. He has never had these symptoms before and is certain that they started 1 hour prior to arrival. He is awake and alert with a blood pressure of 134/82 and a pulse of 128. His physical exam

BestBETS2007