Latest & greatest articles for sedation

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Top results for sedation

121. Guidance for the use of propofol sedation for adult patients undergoing Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and other complex upper GI endoscopic procedures

Guidance for the use of propofol sedation for adult patients undergoing Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and other complex upper GI endoscopic procedures

Royal College of Anaesthetists2011

122. Can Intra-articular Lidocaine Supplant the Need for Procedural Sedation for Reduction of Acute Anterior Shoulder Dislocation?

Can Intra-articular Lidocaine Supplant the Need for Procedural Sedation for Reduction of Acute Anterior Shoulder Dislocation? DEFINE_ME_WA This site requires Cookies to be enabled to function. Please ensure Cookies are turned on and then re-visit the desired page.

Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots2011

123. Is a global sedation protocol available for surveillance colonoscopy?

Is a global sedation protocol available for surveillance colonoscopy? Is a global sedation protocol available for surveillance colonoscopy? - Cancer Guidelines Wiki Skip Links Personal tools Search Navigation Cancer Council guidelines Methodology Hosted cancer guidelines Prevention Policies Social links Page actions > Clinical question > Is a global sedation protocol available for surveillance colonoscopy? Information on authorship and revision Last modified : 22 October 2014 10:37:17 Author(s (...) ) : — Author — Co-author Cite this page Reeve, T, Cancer Council Australia Surveillance Colonoscopy Guidelines Working Party. Is a global sedation protocol available for surveillance colonoscopy? [Version URL: , cited 2017 May 22]. Available from . In: Cancer Council Australia Surveillance Colonoscopy Guidelines Working Party. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Surveillance Colonoscopy. Sydney: Cancer Council Australia. Available from: . Contents Is a global sedation protocol available for surveillance

MHRA Drug Safety Update2011

124. American College of Chest Physicians Consensus Statement on the Use of Topical Anesthesia, Analgesia, and Sedation During Flexible Bronchoscopy in Adult Patients

American College of Chest Physicians Consensus Statement on the Use of Topical Anesthesia, Analgesia, and Sedation During Flexible Bronchoscopy in Adult Patients CHEST Consensus Statement 1342 Consensus Statement Executive Summary Performing Bronchoscopy With No Sedation There is an equal safety record of sedation 1. vs no sedation in bronchoscopy, but patients’ satisfaction and procedure tol- erance are signi? cantly improved with sedation. Sedation is suggested in all patients un- 2. dergoing (...) bronchoscopy unless contra- indications exist. The extent of sedation (minimal, mod- 3. erate, deep, or general anesthesia) used during bronchoscopy can vary based on American College of Chest Physicians Consensus Statement on the Use of Topical Anesthesia, Analgesia, and Sedation During Flexible Bronchoscopy in Adult Patients Momen M. W ahidi , MD, MBA, FCCP ; Prasoon Jain , MD, FCCP ; Michael Jantz , MD, FCCP ; Pyng Lee , MD, FCCP ; G. Burkhard Mackensen , MD, PhD ; Sally Y . Barbour , PharmD ; Carla

American College of Chest Physicians2011

125. Pushing the envelope to reduce sedation in critically ill patients

Pushing the envelope to reduce sedation in critically ill patients Pushing the envelope to reduce sedation in critically ill patients | Critical Care | Full Text Advertisement Search BioMed Central articles Search Impact Factor 4.950 Main menu Journal club critique Open Access Pushing the envelope to reduce sedation in critically ill patients Olufunmilayo Ogundele and Sachin Yende Critical Care 2010 14 :339 DOI: 10.1186/cc9339 © BioMed Central Ltd 2010 Published: 09 December 2010 Article (...) details Evidence-based Medicine Journal Club Edited by: Sachin Yende. University of Pittsburgh Department of Critical Care Medicine Expanded Abstract Citation Strom T, Martinussen T, Toft P: A protocol of no sedation for critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation: a randomized trial. Lancet 2010, 375:475-480 [ ]. Background Standard treatment of critically ill patients undergoing mechanical ventilation is continuous sedation. Daily interruption of sedation has a beneficial effect

Critical Care - EBM Journal Club2010 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

127. The effect of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on postoperative analgesia and sedation in pediatric patients undergoing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy

The effect of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on postoperative analgesia and sedation in pediatric patients undergoing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy 20610555 2010 07 28 2010 08 26 2013 11 21 1526-7598 111 2 2010 Aug Anesthesia and analgesia Anesth. Analg. The effect of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on postoperative analgesia and sedation in pediatric patients undergoing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy. 490-5 10.1213/ANE.0b013e3181e33429 The immediate postoperative period after tonsillectomy (...) and adenoidectomy, one of the most common pediatric surgical procedures, is often difficult. These children frequently have severe pain but postoperative airway edema along with increased sensitivity to the respiratory-depressant effects of opioids may result in obstructive symptoms and hypoxemia. Opioid consumption may be reduced by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, but these drugs may be associated with increased bleeding after this operation. Dexmedetomidine has mild analgesic properties, causes sedation

EvidenceUpdates2010

128. Dexmedetomidine vs Midazolam for Sedation of Critically Ill Patients: A Randomized Trial

Dexmedetomidine vs Midazolam for Sedation of Critically Ill Patients: A Randomized Trial PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club2010

129. A cost-minimization analysis of dexmedetomidine compared with midazolam for long-term sedation in the intensive care unit

A cost-minimization analysis of dexmedetomidine compared with midazolam for long-term sedation in the intensive care unit 19789442 2010 01 20 2010 02 22 2015 11 19 1530-0293 38 2 2010 Feb Critical care medicine Crit. Care Med. A cost-minimization analysis of dexmedetomidine compared with midazolam for long-term sedation in the intensive care unit. 497-503 10.1097/CCM.0b013e3181bc81c9 To compare the intensive care unit costs and determine factors influencing these costs in mechanically (...) ventilated patients randomized to dexmedetomidine or midazolam by continuous infusion. Cost minimization analysis of a double-blind, multicenter clinical trial randomizing patients 2:1 to receive dexmedetomidine or midazolam from the institutional perspective. Sixty-eight intensive care units in the United States, Australia, New Zealand, Brazil, and Argentina. A total of 366 intubated intensive care unit patients anticipated to require sedation for >24 hrs. Intensive care unit resource use was compared

EvidenceUpdates2010

130. Cost-consequence analysis of remifentanil-based analgo-sedation vs conventional analgesia and sedation for patients on mechanical ventilation in the Netherlands

Cost-consequence analysis of remifentanil-based analgo-sedation vs conventional analgesia and sedation for patients on mechanical ventilation in the Netherlands Cost-consequence analysis of remifentanil-based analgo-sedation vs conventional analgesia and sedation for patients on mechanical ventilation in the Netherlands Cost-consequence analysis of remifentanil-based analgo-sedation vs conventional analgesia and sedation for patients on mechanical ventilation in the Netherlands Al MJ, Hakkaart (...) L, Tan SS, Bakker J Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary The aim was to assess the cost consequences of sedation using remifentanil, compared with the usual sedation, for patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) who

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2010

131. Review article: safety profile of propofol for paediatric procedural sedation in the emergency department

Review article: safety profile of propofol for paediatric procedural sedation in the emergency department Review article: safety profile of propofol for paediatric procedural sedation in the emergency department Review article: safety profile of propofol for paediatric procedural sedation in the emergency department Lamond DW CRD summary This review concluded that use of propofol for paediatric procedural sedation was associated with a low rate of minor adverse events and major adverse events (...) with propofol sedation were extremely rare. These conclusions should be interpreted cautiously given concerns about the review methods and the possibility of publication and language biases. Authors' objectives To assess the adverse events of propofol for paediatric procedural sedation in the emergency department. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library were searched from inception to December 2008 for studies in English. Search terms were reported. Reference lists of retrieved

DARE.2010

132. Propofol for moderate sedation during colonoscopy

Propofol for moderate sedation during colonoscopy Propofol for moderate sedation during colonoscopy Propofol for moderate sedation during colonoscopy Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Report may be purchased from Citation Propofol for moderate sedation during colonoscopy . Lansdale: HAYES, Inc.. 2010 Authors' objectives Propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol (...) ) is a short-acting, intravenous anesthetic agent, which has been used since the 1990s for inducing general anesthesia. Colonoscopists use propofol at lower concentrations to induce moderate to deep sedation. It is chemically unrelated to other central nervous system medications that are used to sedate patients during colonoscopy such as benzodiazepines. Propofol does not have an analgesic effect; therefore, for moderate sedation, propofol is combined with opiates or barbiturates. Project page URL Indexing

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2010

134. A protocol of no sedation for critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation: a randomised trial.

A protocol of no sedation for critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation: a randomised trial. 20116842 2010 02 15 2010 03 08 2015 11 19 1474-547X 375 9713 2010 Feb 06 Lancet (London, England) Lancet A protocol of no sedation for critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation: a randomised trial. 475-80 10.1016/S0140-6736(09)62072-9 Standard treatment of critically ill patients undergoing mechanical ventilation is continuous sedation. Daily interruption of sedation has (...) a beneficial effect, and in the general intesive care unit of Odense University Hospital, Denmark, standard practice is a protocol of no sedation. We aimed to establish whether duration of mechanical ventilation could be reduced with a protocol of no sedation versus daily interruption of sedation. Of 428 patients assessed for eligibility, we enrolled 140 critically ill adult patients who were undergoing mechanical ventilation and were expected to need ventilation for more than 24 h. Patients were randomly

Lancet2010

135. Early cognitive impairment after sedation for colonoscopy: the effect of adding midazolam and/or fentanyl to propofol

Early cognitive impairment after sedation for colonoscopy: the effect of adding midazolam and/or fentanyl to propofol 19617584 2009 10 21 2009 11 05 2014 11 20 1526-7598 109 5 2009 Nov Anesthesia and analgesia Anesth. Analg. Early cognitive impairment after sedation for colonoscopy: the effect of adding midazolam and/or fentanyl to propofol. 1448-55 10.1213/ane.0b013e3181a6ad31 The sedative drug combination that produces minimal cognitive impairment and optimal operating conditions during (...) colonoscopy has not been determined. We sought to determine if the use of propofol alone results in less cognitive impairment at discharge than the use of propofol plus midazolam and/or fentanyl in patients presenting for elective outpatient colonoscopy. Two hundred adult patients presenting for elective outpatient colonoscopy were randomized to receive propofol alone or propofol plus midazolam, and/or fentanyl for IV sedation. Baseline cognitive function was measured using the computerized CogState test

EvidenceUpdates2009

136. Randomized clinical trial of propofol with and without alfentanil for deep procedural sedation in the emergency department

Randomized clinical trial of propofol with and without alfentanil for deep procedural sedation in the emergency department 19845550 2009 10 22 2011 03 23 2013 11 21 1553-2712 16 9 2009 Sep Academic emergency medicine : official journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Acad Emerg Med Randomized clinical trial of propofol with and without alfentanil for deep procedural sedation in the emergency department. 825-34 10.1111/j.1553-2712.2009.00487.x The objectives were to compare (...) the efficacy, occurrence of adverse events, and recovery duration of propofol with and without alfentanil for use in procedural sedation in the emergency department (ED). This was a randomized nonblinded prospective trial of adult patients undergoing procedural sedation for painful procedures in the ED. Patients with pain before the procedure were given intravenous (IV) morphine sulfate until their pain was adequately treated at least 20 minutes before starting the procedure. Patients received 1 mg/kg

EvidenceUpdates2009

137. Randomized trial of light versus deep sedation on mental health after critical illness

Randomized trial of light versus deep sedation on mental health after critical illness 19602975 2009 08 19 2009 09 16 2015 11 19 1530-0293 37 9 2009 Sep Critical care medicine Crit. Care Med. Randomized trial of light versus deep sedation on mental health after critical illness. 2527-34 10.1097/CCM.0b013e3181a5689f : To investigate if light sedation favorably affects subsequent patient mental health compared with deep sedation. Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder are common in patients (...) after they have undergone prolonged mechanical ventilation and are associated with sedation depth. : Randomized, open-label, controlled trial. : Single tertiary care center. : Adult patients requiring mechanical ventilation. : Patients were randomized to receive either light (patient awake and cooperative) or deep sedation (patient asleep, awakening upon physical stimulation). : Self-reported measures of posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety, and depression were collected at intensive

EvidenceUpdates2009

138. Last-resort options for palliative sedation.

Last-resort options for palliative sedation. Despite receiving state-of-the-art palliative care, some patients still experience severe suffering toward the end of life. Palliative sedation is a potential way to respond to such suffering, but access is uneven and unpredictable, in part because of confusion about different kinds of sedation. Proportionate palliative sedation (PPS) uses the minimum amount of sedation necessary to relieve refractory physical symptoms at the very end of life. To (...) relieve suffering may require progressive increases in sedation, sometimes to the point of unconsciousness, but consciousness is maintained if possible. Palliative sedation with the intended end point of unconsciousness (PSU) is a more controversial practice that may be considered for much fewer refractory cases. There is more ethical consensus about PPS than PSU. In this article, the authors explore the clinical, ethical, and legal issues associated with these practices. They recommend

Annals of Internal Medicine2009

139. A critical review of daily sedation interruption in the intensive care unit

A critical review of daily sedation interruption in the intensive care unit 19077018 2009 05 05 2009 07 23 2009 05 05 1365-2702 18 9 2009 May Journal of clinical nursing J Clin Nurs A critical review of daily sedation interruption in the intensive care unit. 1239-49 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2008.02513.x Daily sedation interruption (DSI) has been proposed as a method of improving sedation management of critically ill patients by reducing the adverse effects of continuous sedation infusions (...) . To critique the research regarding daily sedation interruption, to inform education, research and practice in this area of intensive care practice. Literature review. Medline, CINAHL and Web of Science were searched for relevant key terms. Eight research-based studies, published in the English language between 1995-December 2006 and three conference abstracts were retrieved. Of the eight articles and three conference abstracts reviewed, five originated from one intensive care unit (ICU) in the USA

EvidenceUpdates2009

140. Randomized clinical trial of Entonox versus midazolam-fentanyl sedation for colonoscopy

Randomized clinical trial of Entonox versus midazolam-fentanyl sedation for colonoscopy 19283736 2009 03 18 2009 03 26 2013 11 21 1365-2168 96 4 2009 Apr The British journal of surgery Br J Surg Randomized clinical trial of Entonox versus midazolam-fentanyl sedation for colonoscopy. 361-8 10.1002/bjs.6467 Intravenous sedation for colonoscopy is associated with cardiorespiratory complications and delayed recovery. The aim of this randomized clinical trial was to compare the efficacy of Entonox (...) (50 per cent nitrous oxide and 50 per cent oxygen) and intravenous sedation using midazolam-fentanyl for colonoscopy. Some 131 patients undergoing elective colonoscopy were included. Patients completed a Hospital Anxiety and Depression questionnaire, letter cancellation tests and pain scores on a 100-mm visual analogue scale before, immediately after the procedure and at discharge. They also completed a satisfaction survey at discharge and 24 h after the procedure. Sixty-five patients were

EvidenceUpdates2009