Latest & greatest articles for pulmonary embolism

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Top results for pulmonary embolism

101. Effect of a retrievable inferior vena cava filter plus anticoagulation vs anticoagulation alone on risk of recurrent pulmonary embolism: a randomized clinical trial.

Effect of a retrievable inferior vena cava filter plus anticoagulation vs anticoagulation alone on risk of recurrent pulmonary embolism: a randomized clinical trial. 25919526 2015 04 29 2015 05 06 2016 10 17 1538-3598 313 16 2015 Apr 28 JAMA JAMA Effect of a retrievable inferior vena cava filter plus anticoagulation vs anticoagulation alone on risk of recurrent pulmonary embolism: a randomized clinical trial. 1627-35 10.1001/jama.2015.3780 Although retrievable inferior vena cava filters (...) are frequently used in addition to anticoagulation in patients with acute venous thromboembolism, their benefit-risk ratio is unclear. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of retrievable vena cava filters plus anticoagulation vs anticoagulation alone for preventing pulmonary embolism recurrence in patients presenting with acute pulmonary embolism and a high risk of recurrence. Randomized, open-label, blinded end point trial (PREPIC2) with 6-month follow-up conducted from August 2006 to January 2013

JAMA2015 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

102. Apixaban (Eliquis) - treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) and prevention of recurrent DVT and PE in adults

Apixaban (Eliquis) - treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) and prevention of recurrent DVT and PE in adults

Scottish Medicines Consortium2015

103. Thrombolysis for pulmonary embolism and risk of all-cause mortality, major bleeding, and intracranial hemorrhage: a meta-analysis

Thrombolysis for pulmonary embolism and risk of all-cause mortality, major bleeding, and intracranial hemorrhage: a meta-analysis PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club2015

104. Pulmonary Embolism (PE): Diagnosis

Pulmonary Embolism (PE): Diagnosis © 2015 Thrombosis Canada Page 1 of 1 PULMONARY EMBOLISM (PE): DIAGNOSIS OBJECTIVE: To provide a diagnostic approach to patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism (PE). BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common disease, affecting approximately 1-2 in 1,000 adults per year. Approximately one third of first VTE presentations are due to PE while the remainder is due to deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The diagnosis of PE has increased significantly (...) since the advent of computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) due to its widespread availability and diagnostic accuracy. The majority of PE originates in the proximal deep veins of the leg, despite the observation that only 25-50% of patients with PE have clinically-evident DVT at the time of PE diagnosis. While active malignancy, surgery (especially orthopedic), immobilization >8 hours, and estrogen use/pregnancy are transient provoking factors, approximately 50% of first-time PE appear

Thrombosis Interest Group of Canada2015

105. Do patients with an asymptomatic sub-segmental pulmonary embolism need anticoagulation therapy?

Do patients with an asymptomatic sub-segmental pulmonary embolism need anticoagulation therapy? BestBets: Do patients with an asymptomatic sub-segmental pulmonary embolism need anticoagulation therapy? Do patients with an asymptomatic sub-segmental pulmonary embolism need anticoagulation therapy? Report By: Hyun Choi - CT3 Search checked by Christopher Morgan - Institution: Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, University Of Manchester Date Submitted: 27th November 2010 (...) Date Completed: 5th January 2015 Last Modified: 5th January 2015 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question [In an asymptomatic patient with small subsegmental pulmonary embolism] does [anticoagulation therapy or no treatment] lead to [reduced mortality and a lower rate of recurrent venous thromboembolism?] Clinical Scenario A 49 year old male, who was previously fit and well, attended the Emergency Department as a trauma patient after being involved in a road traffic collision. He underwent

BestBETS2015

106. Predictive value of the heart-type fatty acid-binding protein and the Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index in patients with acute pulmonary embolism in the emergency department

Predictive value of the heart-type fatty acid-binding protein and the Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index in patients with acute pulmonary embolism in the emergency department 25308138 2014 10 13 2014 12 11 2015 11 19 1553-2712 21 10 2014 Oct Academic emergency medicine : official journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Acad Emerg Med Predictive value of the heart-type fatty acid-binding protein and the Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (...) in the emergency department. 1143-50 10.1111/acem.12484 Heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (h-FABP), sensitive troponins, natriuretic peptides, and clinical scores such as the Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI) are candidates for risk stratification of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). The aim was to compare their respective prognostic values to predict an adverse outcome at 1 month. The authors prospectively included 132 consecutive patients with confirmed acute PE. On admission

EvidenceUpdates2015 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

108. Dabigatran etexilate for the treatment and secondary prevention of deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism

Dabigatran etexilate for the treatment and secondary prevention of deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism Dabigatr Dabigatran ete an etexilate for the treatment xilate for the treatment and secondary pre and secondary prev vention of deep v ention of deep vein ein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism T echnology appraisal guidance Published: 17 December 2014 nice.org.uk/guidance/ta327 © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (...) and/or pulmonary embolism (TA327) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 2 of 48Contents Contents 1 Guidance 4 2 The technology 5 3 The company's submission 6 T able 1 Summary of adverse events in the RE-COVER trials, RE-MEDY and RE-SONATE 8 4 Consideration of the evidence 24 Clinical effectiveness 26 Cost effectiveness 29 Summary of Appraisal Committee's key conclusions 33 5 Implementation 40 6 Review of guidance 41

National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Technology Appraisals2015

109. Rapid Quantitative D-dimer to Exclude Pulmonary Embolism: A Prospective Cohort Management Study

Rapid Quantitative D-dimer to Exclude Pulmonary Embolism: A Prospective Cohort Management Study 26707364 2016 03 10 2016 12 13 2016 12 30 1538-7836 14 3 2016 Mar Journal of thrombosis and haemostasis : JTH J. Thromb. Haemost. Rapid quantitative D-dimer to exclude pulmonary embolism: a prospective cohort management study. 504-9 10.1111/jth.13234 ESSENTIALS: It is not known if D-dimer testing alone can safely exclude pulmonary embolism (PE). We studied the safety of using a quantitative latex (...) agglutination D-dimer to exclude PE in 808 patients. 52% of patients with suspected PE had a negative D-dimer test and were followed for 3 months. The negative predictive value of D-dimer testing alone was 99.8%, suggesting it may safely exclude PE. Strategies are needed to exclude pulmonary embolism (PE) efficiently without the need for imaging tests. Although validated rules for clinical probability assessment can be combined with D-dimer testing to safely exclude PE, the rules can be complicated

EvidenceUpdates2015 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

110. Randomised controlled trial: An IVC filter and anticoagulation for 3?months is unlikely to show a benefit over anticoagulation alone for high-risk patients with acute pulmonary embolism

Randomised controlled trial: An IVC filter and anticoagulation for 3?months is unlikely to show a benefit over anticoagulation alone for high-risk patients with acute pulmonary embolism An IVC filter and anticoagulation for 3 months is unlikely to show a benefit over anticoagulation alone for high-risk patients with acute pulmonary embolism | Evidence-Based Medicine This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username (...) and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here An IVC filter and anticoagulation for 3 months is unlikely to show a benefit over anticoagulation alone for high-risk patients with acute pulmonary embolism Article

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2015

111. Current antipsychotic drug treatment may increase the risk of pulmonary embolism

Current antipsychotic drug treatment may increase the risk of pulmonary embolism Current antipsychotic drug treatment may increase the risk of pulmonary embolism | Evidence-Based Mental Health This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu (...) Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Current antipsychotic drug treatment may increase the risk of pulmonary embolism Article Text Causes and risk factors Current antipsychotic drug treatment may increase the risk of pulmonary embolism Marie Tournier Statistics from Altmetric.com No Altmetric data available for this article. ABSTRACT FROM: Conti V, Venegoni M, Cocci A, et

Evidence-Based Mental Health2015

112. Can Computed Tomography?Assessed Right-Sided Ventricular Dysfunction Predict Mortality in Hemodynamically Stable Pulmonary Embolism?

Can Computed Tomography?Assessed Right-Sided Ventricular Dysfunction Predict Mortality in Hemodynamically Stable Pulmonary Embolism? DEFINE_ME_WA This site requires Cookies to be enabled to function. Please ensure Cookies are turned on and then re-visit the desired page.

Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots2015

113. Pulmonary embolism

Pulmonary embolism Pulmonary embolism - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Pulmonary embolism - Summary Pulmonary embolism is a condition in which one or more emboli, usually arising from a blood clot formed in the veins (or, rarely, in the right heart), are lodged in and obstruct the pulmonary arterial system. This results in reduced gas exchange of the affected lung tissue, causing hypoxaemia and a reduction in cardiac output. Large or multiple emboli may result in hypotension (...) , syncope, shock, and sudden death. The most common source of pulmonary emboli is deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the lower limbs, which can be found in 70–80% of people with pulmonary embolism. Only 15% of people with pulmonary embolism have signs of DVT. Without anticoagulation, the risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism (DVT or pulmonary embolism) within 3 months of a pulmonary embolism is thought to be 50%. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism include: Recent surgery, hospitalization

NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries2015

114. Evaluation of Patients With Suspected Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Best Practice Advice From the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians

Evaluation of Patients With Suspected Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Best Practice Advice From the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians Evaluation of Patients With Suspected Acute Pulmonary Embolism | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of Physicians '); } '); })(); Sign in below to access your subscription for full content INDIVIDUAL SIGN IN | You will be directed to acponline.org to register and create your Annals account INSTITUTIONAL SIGN (...) IN | | Subscribe to Annals of Internal Medicine . You will be directed to acponline.org to complete your purchase. Search Clinical Guidelines | 3 November 2015 Evaluation of Patients With Suspected Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Best Practice Advice From the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians Free Ali S. Raja, MD; Jeffrey O. Greenberg, MD; Amir Qaseem, MD, PhD, MHA; Thomas D. Denberg, MD, PhD; Nick Fitterman, MD; Jeremiah D. Schuur, MD, MHS; for the Clinical Guidelines Committee

American College of Physicians2015

115. Accuracy of the Wells Clinical Prediction Rule for Pulmonary Embolism in Older Ambulatory Adults

Accuracy of the Wells Clinical Prediction Rule for Pulmonary Embolism in Older Ambulatory Adults 25366538 2014 11 21 2015 01 26 2015 07 17 1532-5415 62 11 2014 Nov Journal of the American Geriatrics Society J Am Geriatr Soc Accuracy of the Wells clinical prediction rule for pulmonary embolism in older ambulatory adults. 2136-41 10.1111/jgs.13080 To determine whether the Wells clinical prediction rule for pulmonary embolism (PE), which produces a point score based on clinical features (...) and the likelihood of diagnoses other than PE, combined with normal D-dimer testing can be used to exclude PE in older unhospitalized adults. Prospective cohort study. Primary care and nursing homes. Older adults (≥60) clinically suspected of having a PE (N = 294, mean age 76, 44% residing in a nursing home). The presence of PE was confirmed using a composite reference standard including computed tomography and 3-month follow-up. The proportion of individuals with an unlikely risk of PE was calculated according

EvidenceUpdates2014

116. Outpatient versus inpatient treatment for acute pulmonary embolism.

Outpatient versus inpatient treatment for acute pulmonary embolism. BACKGROUND: Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common life-threatening cardiovascular condition, with an incidence of 23 to 69 new cases per 100,000 people per year. Outpatient treatment instead of traditional inpatient treatment in selected non-high-risk patients with acute PE might provide several advantages, such as reduction of hospitalizations, substantial cost saving and an improvement in health-related quality (...) of life. OBJECTIVES: To compare the efficacy and safety of outpatient versus inpatient treatment for acute PE for the outcomes of all-cause and PE-related mortality; bleeding; and adverse events such as hemodynamic instability, recurrence of PE and patients' satisfaction. SEARCH METHODS: The Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Trials Search Co-ordinator (TSC) searched the Specialised Register (last searched October 2014) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 9

Cochrane2014

118. Risk of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in individuals with polymyositis and dermatomyositis: a general population-based study

Risk of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in individuals with polymyositis and dermatomyositis: a general population-based study 25193998 2015 12 15 2016 04 04 2015 12 15 1468-2060 75 1 2016 Jan Annals of the rheumatic diseases Ann. Rheum. Dis. Risk of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in individuals with polymyositis and dermatomyositis: a general population-based study. 110-6 10.1136/annrheumdis-2014-205800 Patients with polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM) may (...) have an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE); however, no general population data are available to date. The purpose of this study was to estimate the future risk and time trends of new VTE (deep venous thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE)) in individuals with incident PM/DM at the general population level. We assembled a retrospective cohort of all patients with incident PM/DM in British Columbia and a corresponding comparison cohort of up to 10 age-matched, sex-matched and entry

EvidenceUpdates2014 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

119. PE rule-out criteria (PERC) for excluding pulmonary embolism.

PE rule-out criteria (PERC) for excluding pulmonary embolism. BestBets: PE rule-out criteria (PERC) for excluding pulmonary embolism. PE rule-out criteria (PERC) for excluding pulmonary embolism. Report By: Dr Johan Victor Rehnberg - ACCS (Emergency Medicine) CT2 Search checked by Dr Anna Vondy - Specialist Registrar (Emergency Medicine) Institution: Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK Date Submitted: 7th November 2012 Date Completed: 26th February 2014 Last Modified: 26th (...) February 2014 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [adult patients presenting to the Emergency Department (ED)] are the [PE-rule out criteria (PERC)] sufficient to [exclude the diagnosis without the need for a D-dimer]? Clinical Scenario A 25-year-old man presents to the ED complaining of pleuritic chest pain and shortness of breath. He is afebrile, has no other symptoms, takes no medications and has never had any surgery. You wonder whether a clinical decision rule such as the (PERC could

BestBETS2014

120. Validation of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide cut-off values for risk stratification of pulmonary embolism

Validation of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide cut-off values for risk stratification of pulmonary embolism 24627529 2014 06 02 2015 01 15 2015 11 19 1399-3003 43 6 2014 Jun The European respiratory journal Eur. Respir. J. Validation of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide cut-off values for risk stratification of pulmonary embolism. 1669-77 10.1183/09031936.00211613 The optimal N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) cut-off value for risk stratification of pulmonary embolism (...) remains controversial. In this study we validated and compared different proposed NT-proBNP cut-off values in 688 normotensive patients with pulmonary embolism. During the first 30 days, 28 (4.1%) patients reached the primary outcome (pulmonary embolism-related death or complications) and 29 (4.2%) patients died. Receiver operating characteristic analysis yielded an area under the curve of 0.70 (0.60-0.80) for NT-proBNP. A cut-off value of 600 pg·mL(-1) was associated with the best prognostic

EvidenceUpdates2014 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro