Latest & greatest articles for ptsd

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Top results for ptsd

161. The relationship between post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and affective disorder.

The relationship between post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and affective disorder. BestBets: The relationship between post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and affective disorder. The relationship between post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and affective disorder. Report By: Kate Roberts - Medical Student Search checked by Suzanne Robins - Clinical Psychologist Institution: Manchester Royal Infirmary Current web editor: Richard Body - Clinical Research Fellow Date Submitted: 1st March (...) adj3 victim.mp.] AND [affective disorders.mp. or exp Mood Disorders/] AND [PTSD.mp. or exp Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/] Limit to human, English Language and "all adult (19 plus years)" Cochrane: Mood disorders [MeSH] AND Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic [MeSH} – 0 records Search Outcome 133 articles. 8 addressed the question indirectly, but are included as they all relate to PTSD and affective disorder. Relevant Paper(s) Author, date and country Patient group Study type (level of evidence

2007 BestBETS

162. Mothers with post-traumatic stress disorder after traumatic childbirth struggled to survive and experienced nightmares, flashbacks, anger, anxiety, depression, and isolation Full Text available with Trip Pro

is the essence of mothers’ experiences of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after traumatic births? DESIGN Descriptive phenomenology. SETTING A website hosted in New Zealand. PARTICIPANTS 38 mothers (mean age 33 y, 32% primipara) from 4 countries (New Zealand, United States, Australia, and United Kingdom) who had experienced PTSD attributable to birth trauma (women reported that the diagnosis was made by a healthcare professional) and were willing to articulate their experiences. Length of time from (...) Mothers with post-traumatic stress disorder after traumatic childbirth struggled to survive and experienced nightmares, flashbacks, anger, anxiety, depression, and isolation Mothers with post-traumatic stress disorder after traumatic childbirth struggled to survive and experienced nightmares, flashbacks, anger, anxiety, depression, and isolation | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings

2006 Evidence-Based Nursing

163. PTSD plus depression are comorbid conditions but depression can occur independently in the acute aftermath of trauma Full Text available with Trip Pro

study. Setting: Victoria, Australia; timeframe not stated. Population: 363 people aged 18–70 years admitted to a level 1 trauma service with injuries requiring hospital stays of >1 day who were stable and without pain. Exclusions included severe brain injury or recent opioid analgesia. Assessment: The relations between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and predictor variables were examined using canonical correlations and multinomial logistic regression. Outcomes: PTSD was assessed (...) . NOTES Of 363 initial participants, 337 completed the 3 month follow up, 307 completed the 12 month follow up, and 301 completed both. Commentary This study examines the longitudinal course and risk factors of depressive and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a group of 363 injury survivors admitted to a trauma centre. All participants received a comprehensive evaluation while in hospital and were interviewed by telephone three and 12 months after their initial assessment. Three

2006 Evidence-Based Mental Health

164. Trauma focused cognitive behavioural therapy reduces PTSD more effectively than child centred therapy in children who have been sexually abused Full Text available with Trip Pro

behavioural therapy more effective than child centred therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder in sexually abused children? METHODS Design: Randomised controlled trial. Allocation: Concealed. Blinding: Single blinded (clinicians). Follow up period: 12 weeks. Setting: One metropolitan and one suburban outpatient clinic, USA; timeframe not specified. Patients: 229 children aged 8–14 years with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after contact sexual abuse (DSM-IV). Exclusions: active psychotic (...) who had been sexually abused (see for table). At least twice as many children in the CCT group had PTSD after treatment, compared with children in the TF-CBT group. TF-CBT significantly improved symptoms of depression, behavioural problems, shame, credibility, and trust. CONCLUSIONS Trauma focused cognitive behavioural therapy is significantly better than child centred therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder, emotional, and behavioural problems in sexually abused children. Trauma focused

2005 Evidence-Based Mental Health

165. Acute stress disorder is of limited benefit in predicting post-traumatic stress disorder in people surviving traumatic injury Full Text available with Trip Pro

factors: Baseline assessment for acute stress disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was carried out before discharge from hospital. Follow up assessment was carried out by telephone interviews conducted by a trained mental health clinician. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine whether acute stress disorder symptoms predicted PTSD. Backward elimination multiple regression was used to examine the relation between symptom severity of acute stress disorder and PTSD symptoms (...) and 12 months (re-experiencing: three months, OR 4.08, 95% CI 1.37 to 12.22; 12 months, OR 2.73, 95% CI 1.03 to 7.22; arousal: three months, OR 4.96 95% CI 1.52 to 16.20; 12 months, OR 2.84 95% CI 1.09 to 7.38). CONCLUSIONS Acute stress disorder is of limited benefit in predicting post-traumatic stress disorder in people surviving traumatic injury. This is because the low sensitivity of the core dissociative symptoms of ASD results in a high number of false PTSD diagnoses. Re-experiencing and arousal

2005 Evidence-Based Mental Health

166. Cognitive therapy reduces symptoms in people with recent onset post-traumatic stress disorder Full Text available with Trip Pro

stress disorder Free Jonathan I Bisson , DM MRCPsych Statistics from Altmetric.com Ehlers A, Clark DM, Hackmann A, et al . A randomized controlled trial of cognitive therapy, a self-help booklet, and repeated assessments as early interventions for posttraumatic stress disorder. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2003 ; 60 : 1024 –32. Q What is the most effective early intervention for people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): cognitive therapy, provision of a self help booklet, or repeated assessments (...) assessment (p<0.001; see table ). View this table: Table Mean PTSD symptom measures before randomisation and 9 months after intervention for people completing the intervention CONCLUSIONS Cognitive therapy is more effective at reducing recent onset PTSD compared with either provision of a self help booklet or repeated assessments. Commentary The question of how best to help individuals avoid the development of chronic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been increasingly studied. Early single

2005 Evidence-Based Mental Health

167. Cognitive therapy prevented onset of chronic post-traumatic stress disorder after a motor vehicle accident Full Text available with Trip Pro

post-traumatic stress disorder after a motor vehicle accident Free Jonathan I Bisson , BM, MRCPsych Statistics from Altmetric.com Ehlers A, Clark DM, Hackmann A, et al . A randomized controlled trial of cognitive therapy, a self-help booklet, and repeated assessments as early interventions for posttraumatic stress disorder. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2003 ; 60 : 1024 –32. Q In patients who developed post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) ⩽3 months after a motor vehicle accident, is cognitive therapy (CT (...) of follow up. Patient follow up: 93%. MAIN RESULTS Analysis was by intention to treat. Reduction in PTSD symptoms was greater in the CT group than in the SH or RA groups at 3 and 9 months (p values <0.001). Fewer patients in the CT group than in the SH or RA groups had PTSD at 3 months (table) and 9 months (p values <0.001). View this table: Cognitive therapy (CT) v a self help booklet (SHB) or repeated assessments (RA) for preventing chronic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)* CONCLUSION In patients

2005 Evidence-Based Medicine

168. Combined imaginal exposure and cognitive restructuring therapy is more effective than supportive counselling for treating post-traumatic stress disorder Full Text available with Trip Pro

: 706 –12. Q For people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), does cognitive restructuring with prolonged imaginal exposure lead to greater symptom relief than imaginal exposure alone? METHODS Design: Randomised controlled trial. Allocation: Concealed. Blinding: Assessors blinded to treatment. Follow up period: Six months. Setting: Hospital PTSD unit, Sydney, Australia. Patients: 58 people referred to PTSD unit after non-sexual assault or traffic accident, displaying PTSD (DSM-IV criteria) ≥ 3 (...) with supportive counselling (p<0.05 at post-treatment and 6 months follow up; see web extra table 1 ). Imaginal exposure did not significantly reduce PTSD symptoms compared with supportive counselling alone. View this table: Table 1 Absolute risk of post-traumatic stress disorder after treatment. CONCLUSIONS Imaginal exposure with cognitive restructuring was more effective than supportive counselling for the treatment of PTSD. Commentary Randomised controlled trials have shown that cognitive behaviour therapy

2005 Evidence-Based Mental Health

169. The self rating inventory for post-traumatic stress disorder may aid diagnosis among older people in the community Full Text available with Trip Pro

in the community? METHODS Design: Two stage longitudinal study. Setting: 11 municipalities in the Netherlands; 1998 to 1999. People: 1721 older people (aged 55 to 85 years) living in the community. Participants were randomly selected from the population registers. Test: The self rating inventory for post-traumatic stress disorder (SRIP) includes 22 items based on DSM-IV criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Each item is rated on a 4 point scale (1 = not at all to 4 = extremely) and total SRIP (...) The self rating inventory for post-traumatic stress disorder may aid diagnosis among older people in the community The self rating inventory for post-traumatic stress disorder may aid diagnosis among older people in the community | Evidence-Based Mental Health We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username

2005 Evidence-Based Mental Health

170. Post-traumatic stress disorder: management

Post-traumatic stress disorder: management Post-traumatic stress disorder: management | Guidance | NICE Post-traumatic stress disorder: management Clinical guideline [CG26] Published date: March 2005 Guidance This guidance has been updated and replaced by . Explore © NICE [year]. All rights reserved. Subject to .

2005 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

171. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): the management of PTSD in adults and children in primary and secondary care

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): the management of PTSD in adults and children in primary and secondary care Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): the management of PTSD in adults and children in primary and secondary care Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): the management of PTSD in adults and children in primary and secondary care National Institute for Clinical Excellence Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation (...) of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation National Institute for Clinical Excellence. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): the management of PTSD in adults and children in primary and secondary care. London: National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) 2005: 41 Authors' objectives This report provides guidelines on the management of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in adults and children in primary and secondary care. Authors' conclusions Initial response

2005 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

172. Systematic review of screening instruments for adults at risk of PTSD

Systematic review of screening instruments for adults at risk of PTSD Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2005 DARE.

173. A multidimensional meta-analysis of psychotherapy for PTSD

A multidimensional meta-analysis of psychotherapy for PTSD Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2005 DARE.

174. Trauma and PTSD symptoms in Rwanda: implications for attitudes toward justice and reconciliation. Full Text available with Trip Pro

reconciliation initiatives.To assess the level of trauma exposure and the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and their predictors among Rwandans and to determine how trauma exposure and PTSD symptoms are associated with Rwandans' attitudes toward justice and reconciliation.Multistage, stratified cluster random survey of 2091 eligible adults in selected households in 4 communes in Rwanda in February 2002.Rates of exposure to trauma and symptom criteria for PTSD using the PTSD (...) Trauma and PTSD symptoms in Rwanda: implications for attitudes toward justice and reconciliation. The 1994 genocide in Rwanda led to the loss of at least 10% of the country's 7.7 million inhabitants, the destruction of much of the country's infrastructure, and the displacement of nearly 4 million people. In seeking to rebuild societies such as Rwanda, it is important to understand how traumatic experience may shape the ability of individuals and groups to respond to judicial and other

2004 JAMA

175. Sertraline as a treatment for PTSD: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Sertraline as a treatment for PTSD: a systematic review and meta-analysis Sertraline as a treatment for PTSD: a systematic review and meta-analysis Sertraline as a treatment for PTSD: a systematic review and meta-analysis Mooney P, Oakley J, Ferriter M, Travers R CRD summary This review assessed the effectiveness of sertraline for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder. The authors concluded that there is evidence to support the use of sertraline, but further research is required (...) . Although there were a number of limitations to this review, the authors' conclusions appear appropriately cautious. Authors' objectives To assess the effectiveness of sertraline for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Searching PsycINFO, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the National Centre for PTSD and the Cochrane Library were searched using the reported search terms. The references of included and excluded studies were checked for further primary studies. Study selection Study designs

2004 DARE.

176. Brief psychological interventions ("debriefing") for trauma-related symptoms and the prevention of post traumatic stress disorder. Full Text available with Trip Pro

was generally poor. Data from two trials could not be synthesised.Single session individual debriefing did not reduce psychological distress nor prevent the onset of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Those who received the intervention showed no significant short term (3-5 months) in the risk of PTSD (pooled odds ratio 1.0, 95% ci 0.6-1.8). At one year one trial reported that there was a significantly increased risk of PTSD in those receiving debriefing (odds ratio 2.9, 95% ci 1.1-7.5). The pooled odds (...) Brief psychological interventions ("debriefing") for trauma-related symptoms and the prevention of post traumatic stress disorder. To assess the effectiveness of brief psychological debriefing for the management of psychological distress after trauma, and the prevention of post traumatic stress disorder.Electronic searching of MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychLit, PILOTS, Biosis, Pascal, Occ.Safety and Health, CDSR and the Trials Register of the Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis group. Hand search

2000 Cochrane

177. Sertraline: a review of its therapeutic use in post-traumatic stress disorder

in the review Sertraline (50-200mg/day). Participants included in the review Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Patients reported in the review met the American Psychiatric Association DSM-III-R criteria for PTSD. The review included patients from the general population and war veterans with predominantly combat induced PTSD. Outcomes assessed in the review Clinician administered PTSD Scale Part 2 (CAPS-2), Clinical Global Impression Improvement scale (CGI-I), Clinical Global Improvement (...) for PTSD, particularly in females from the civilian population. Research: Large well-designed studies are needed to clarify the specific role of sertraline compared with other agents, particularly other SSRIs, in the treatment of PTSD. Bibliographic details Comer A M, Figgitt D P. Sertraline: a review of its therapeutic use in post-traumatic stress disorder. CNS Drugs 2000; 14(5): 391-407 Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors /therapeutic use; Sertraline

2000 DARE.

178. Eye movement desentitization and reprocessing in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder: a review of an emerging therapy

) of eye movement densensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR) in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, HealthSTAR, PsycLIT, the Cochrane Library, Best Evidence and the National Research Register using appropriate keywords and subject headings. The search was conducted from 1989, when evaluation of EMDR was first reported, to November 1999. The authors also searched Internet sites concerning PTSD, contacted experts in the field for recently completed or on-going (...) Eye movement desentitization and reprocessing in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder: a review of an emerging therapy Eye movement desentitization and reprocessing in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder: a review of an emerging therapy Eye movement desentitization and reprocessing in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder: a review of an emerging therapy Shepherd J, Stein K, Milne R Authors' objectives To critically review randomised controlled trials (RCTs

2000 DARE.

179. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing in the treatment of post traumatic stress disorder

Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing in the treatment of post traumatic stress disorder Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing in the treatment of post traumatic stress disorder Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing in the treatment of post traumatic stress disorder Shepherd J, Stein K Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA (...) database. Citation Shepherd J, Stein K. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing in the treatment of post traumatic stress disorder. Southampton: Wessex Institute for Health Research and Development (WIHRD) 1998 Authors' objectives To summarise the evidence relating to Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), a relatively new form of psychotherapy designed to alleviate symptoms of anxiety, depression, avoidance of trauma related thoughts and intrusive memories. Authors' conclusions

1998 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

180. Comparative efficacy of treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder: a meta-analysis

Comparative efficacy of treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder: a meta-analysis Comparative efficacy of treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder: a meta-analysis Comparative efficacy of treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder: a meta-analysis Van Etten M L, Taylor S Authors' objectives To assess the efficacy of treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): to identify which classes of treatment are more effective than wait-list controls or placebo, to determine (...) , wait-list controls, supportive psychotherapies, and non- saccade EMDR control). Participants included in the review Patients diagnosed with chronic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) according to American Psychiatric Association DSM III, DSM III-R, or DSM-IV criteria, as assessed by structured or unstructured clinical interviews. Outcomes assessed in the review Intrusions, avoidance, total PTSD severity, depression, and anxiety. Scores for self-reported intrusions, avoidance and total PTSD

1998 DARE.