Latest & greatest articles for prostate cancer

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Top results for prostate cancer

1. Prostate MRI, with or without MRI-targeted biopsy, and systematic biopsy for detecting prostate cancer. (PubMed)

Prostate MRI, with or without MRI-targeted biopsy, and systematic biopsy for detecting prostate cancer. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with or without MRI-targeted biopsy, is an alternative test to systematic transrectal ultrasonography-guided biopsy in men suspected of having prostate cancer. At present, evidence on which test to use is insufficient to inform detailed evidence-based decision-making.To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the index tests MRI only, MRI (...) -targeted biopsy, the MRI pathway (MRI with or without MRI-targeted biopsy) and systematic biopsy as compared to template-guided biopsy as the reference standard in detecting clinically significant prostate cancer as the target condition, defined as International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grade 2 or higher. Secondary target conditions were the detection of grade 1 and grade 3 or higher-grade prostate cancer, and a potential change in the number of biopsy procedures.We performed

2019 Cochrane

2. Abiraterone acetate (prostate cancer) - Benefit assessment according to §35a Social Code Book V

Abiraterone acetate (prostate cancer) - Benefit assessment according to §35a Social Code Book V Extract 1 Translation of Sections 2.1 to 2.6 of the dossier assessment Abirateronacetat (Prostatakarzinom) – Nutzenbewertung gemäß § 35a SGB V (Version 1.0; Status: 13 March 2018). Please note: This translation is provided as a service by IQWiG to English-language readers. However, solely the German original text is absolutely authoritative and legally binding. IQWiG Reports – Commission No. A17-64 (...) Abiraterone acetate (prostate cancer) – Benefit assessment according to §35a Social Code Book V 1 Extract of dossier assessment A17-64 Version 1.0 Abiraterone acetate (prostate cancer) 13 March 2018 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) - i - Publishing details Publisher: Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care Topic: Abiraterone acetate (prostate cancer) – Benefit assessment according to §35a Social Code Book V Commissioning agency: Federal Joint Committee Commission

2019 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Healthcare (IQWiG)

3. Prostate Cancer

Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer | Uroweb › Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer To access the pdfs & translations of individual guidelines, please as EAU member. Non-EAU members can view the web versions. To become an EAU member, click . N. Mottet (Chair), R.C.N. van den Bergh, E. Briers (Patient Representative), P. Cornford (Vice-chair), M. De Santis, S. Fanti, S. Gillessen, J. Grummet, A.M. Henry, T.B. Lam, M.D. Mason, T.H. van der Kwast, H.G. van der Poel, O. Rouvière, D. Tilki, T. Wiegel (...) Guidelines Associates: T. Van den Broeck, M. Cumberbatch, N. Fossati, T. Gross, M. Lardas, M. Liew, L. Moris, I.G. Schoots, P-P.M. Willemse TABLE OF CONTENTS REFERENCES 1. Drost, F.J.H., et al. Prostate MRI, with or without MRI-targeted biopsy, and systematic biopsy for detecting prostate cancer. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2019. In press. 2. Van den Broeck, T., et al. Prognostic Value of Biochemical Recurrence Following Treatment with Curative Intent for Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review

2019 European Association of Urology

4. Abiraterone acetate (prostate cancer) - Addendum to Commission A17-64

Abiraterone acetate (prostate cancer) - Addendum to Commission A17-64 1 Translation of addendum A18-26 Abirateronacetat (Prostatakarzinom) – Addendum zum Auftrag A17-64 (Version 1.0; Status: 11 May 2018). Please note: This translation is provided as a service by IQWiG to English- language readers. However, solely the German original text is absolutely authoritative and legally binding. Addendum 11 May 2018 1.0 Commission: A18-26 Version: Status: IQWiG Reports – Commission No. A18-26 Abiraterone (...) acetate (prostate cancer) – Addendum to Commission A17-64 1 Addendum A18-26 Version 1.0 Abiraterone acetate – Addendum to Commission A17-64 11 May 2018 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) - i - Publishing details Publisher: Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care Topic: Abiraterone acetate (prostate cancer) – Addendum to Commission A17-64 Commissioning agency: Federal Joint Committee Commission awarded on: 25 April 2018 Internal Commission No.: A18-26 Address

2019 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Healthcare (IQWiG)

5. Apalutamide (Erleada) - cancer of the prostate

Apalutamide (Erleada) - cancer of the prostate EMA/810516/2018 EMEA/H/C/004452 Erleada (apalutamide) An overview of Erleada and why it is authorised in the EU What is Erleada and what is it used for? Erleada is a cancer medicine used to treat men with cancer of the prostate (a gland of the male reproductive system). It is used when the cancer is not responding to treatments that lower testosterone levels and is at high risk of spreading to other parts of the body. Erleada contains the active (...) substance apalutamide. How is Erleada used? Erleada is available as tablets (60 mg) to be taken by mouth. The recommended dose is 4 tablets (240 mg) a day. Treatment may be stopped temporarily and later restarted at a reduced dose if the patient experiences intolerable side effects. Erleada can only be obtained with a prescription and treatment should be started and supervised by a doctor experienced in the treatment of prostate cancer. For more information about using Erleada, see the package leaflet

2019 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

6. Use of Low-Dose Aspirin and Mortality After Prostate Cancer Diagnosis: A Nationwide Cohort Study. (PubMed)

Use of Low-Dose Aspirin and Mortality After Prostate Cancer Diagnosis: A Nationwide Cohort Study. Recent studies suggest that aspirin use may improve survival in patients with prostate cancer.To assess the association between postdiagnosis use of low-dose aspirin and prostate cancer mortality.Nationwide cohort study.Denmark.Men with incident prostate adenocarcinoma between 2000 and 2011.Nationwide registry data on tumor characteristics, drug use, primary prostate cancer therapy, comorbidity (...) , and socioeconomic parameters. Postdiagnosis use of low-dose aspirin (75 to 150 mg) was defined as 2 or more prescriptions filled within 1 year after prostate cancer diagnosis. Follow-up started 1 year after prostate cancer diagnosis. In secondary analyses, low-dose aspirin use was assessed within exposure periods of 5 or 7.5 years after prostate cancer diagnosis.Of 29 136 patients (median age, 70 years), 7633 died of prostate cancer and 5575 died of other causes during a median follow-up of 4.9 years

2019 Annals of Internal Medicine

7. Darolutamide in Nonmetastatic, Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer. (PubMed)

Darolutamide in Nonmetastatic, Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer. Darolutamide is a structurally unique androgen-receptor antagonist that is under development for the treatment of prostate cancer. We evaluated the efficacy of darolutamide for delaying metastasis and death in men with nonmetastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial involving men with nonmetastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (...) with a higher incidence of seizures, falls, fractures, cognitive disorder, or hypertension than placebo.Among men with nonmetastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer, metastasis-free survival was significantly longer with darolutamide than with placebo. The incidence of adverse events was similar for darolutamide and placebo. (Funded by Bayer HealthCare and Orion Pharma; ARAMIS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02200614.).Copyright © 2019 Massachusetts Medical Society.

2019 NEJM

8. Axumin for functional imaging of prostate cancer recurrence

Axumin for functional imaging of prostate cancer recurrence Axumin for functional imaging of prostate cancer Axumin for functional imaging of prostate cancer recurrence recurrence Medtech innovation briefing Published: 8 February 2019 nice.org.uk/guidance/mib172 pathways Summary Summary The technology technology described in this briefing is Axumin, a radiopharmaceutical agent. It is intended for use in positron emission tomography (PET) to detect suspected prostate cancer recurrence in people (...) who have elevated prostate-specific antigen levels after primary curative treatment. It is currently the only licensed PET tracer indicated for use in recurrent prostate cancer. The inno innovativ vative aspects e aspects are that it is a prostate cancer-specific PET tracer with a novel mechanism of action based on amino acid transport. Its longer half-life and shorter uptake period may allow use in more people with suspected prostate cancer recurrence compared with other PET tracers. The intended

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Advice

9. Fluorine- or gallium- prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers in the investigation of recurrent prostate cancer

Fluorine- or gallium- prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers in the investigation of recurrent prostate cancer Fluorine- or gallium- prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography radiotracers - Health Technology Wales > Fluorine- or gallium- prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography radiotracers Fluorine- or gallium- prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography radiotracers Topic Status (...) Incomplete Fluorine- or gallium- prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers in the investigation of recurrent prostate cancer. Outcome of the appraisal The adoption of 68 Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) positron emission tomography (PET) for the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer is partially supported by the evidence. The use of 68 Ga PSMA PET provides a high degree of diagnostic accuracy on which to base management decisions as compared

2019 Health Technology Wales

10. Remote monitoring or self-management for surveillance or follow up of prostate cancer

Remote monitoring or self-management for surveillance or follow up of prostate cancer Remote monitoring of prostate cancer - Health Technology Wales > Remote monitoring of prostate cancer Remote monitoring of prostate cancer Topic Status Incomplete Remote monitoring or self-management for surveillance or follow up of prostate cancer. Summary Health Technology Wales researchers searched for evidence on different methods of prostate remote monitoring/self-management. Although a range of evidence

2019 Health Technology Wales

11. Health-related Quality of Life for Abiraterone Plus Prednisone Versus Enzalutamide in Patients with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer: Results from a Phase II Randomized Trial

Health-related Quality of Life for Abiraterone Plus Prednisone Versus Enzalutamide in Patients with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer: Results from a Phase II Randomized Trial Abiraterone and enzalutamide are associated with side effects that may impair health-related quality of life (HRQoL).To assess patient-reported HRQoL, depression symptoms, and cognitive function for abiraterone versus enzalutamide.We randomized 202 patients in a phase II study of abiraterone versus (...) enzalutamide for first-line treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02125357).Patients completed Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P) and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) questionnaires, and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) cognitive assessments at baseline and on treatment.To compare the change in FACT-P scores over time between treatment arms, we used a mixed model for repeated measures (MMRM). For FACT-P domains where

2019 EvidenceUpdates

12. Biodegradable Rectal Spacers for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

Biodegradable Rectal Spacers for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy Recommendation Report 21-5 A Quality Initiative of the Program in Evidence-Based Care (PEBC), Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) Biodegradable Rectal Spacers for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy P Chung, J Brown, D D‘Souza, W Koll, S Morgan and the biodegradable spacer insertion during radiotherapy for prostate cancer recommendation report group (SPACER RRG) Report Date: January 16, 2019 For information about this document, please contact Dr (...) Spacers for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy. Toronto (ON): Cancer Care Ontario: 2019, January 16. Program in Evidence- based Care Recommendation Report No.: 21-5. Copyright This report is copyrighted by Cancer Care Ontario; the report and the illustrations herein may not be reproduced without the express written permission of Cancer Care Ontario. Cancer Care Ontario reserves the right at any time, and at its sole discretion, to change or revoke this authorization. Disclaimer Care has been taken

2019 Cancer Care Ontario

13. Short-term androgen suppression and radiotherapy versus intermediate-term androgen suppression and radiotherapy, with or without zoledronic acid, in men with locally advanced prostate cancer (TROG 03.04 RADAR): 10-year results from a randomised, phase 3,

Short-term androgen suppression and radiotherapy versus intermediate-term androgen suppression and radiotherapy, with or without zoledronic acid, in men with locally advanced prostate cancer (TROG 03.04 RADAR): 10-year results from a randomised, phase 3, The optimal duration of androgen suppression for men with locally advanced prostate cancer receiving radiotherapy with curative intent is yet to be defined. Zoledronic acid is effective in preventing androgen suppression-induced bone loss (...) , but its role in preventing castration-sensitive bone metastases in locally advanced prostate cancer is unclear. The RADAR trial assessed whether the addition of 12 months of adjuvant androgen suppression, 18 months of zoledronic acid, or both, can improve outcomes in men with locally advanced prostate cancer who receive 6 months of androgen suppression and prostatic radiotherapy. This report presents 10-year outcomes from this trial.For this randomised, phase 3, 2 × 2 factorial trial, eligible men

2019 EvidenceUpdates

14. Men feel physically and psychologically ill-prepared for prostate cancer surgery

Men feel physically and psychologically ill-prepared for prostate cancer surgery Men feel physically and psychologically ill-prepared for prostate cancer surgery Discover Portal Discover Portal Men feel physically and psychologically ill-prepared for prostate cancer surgery Published on 28 November 2017 doi: Following prostate cancer surgery men often experience physical changes, such as urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, causing negative emotions and distress. This review found (...) that men felt poorly prepared – psychologically and physically – for the changes they might experience after surgery. Surgery was often described as "life-changing", and men described worrying about their future. NICE recommend that men and their partners/carers are fully informed about prostate cancer treatment options and their possible complications, and are supported in decision-making. This includes having access to psychosexual support at any time. This global review represents the views of men

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

15. MRI scan before biopsy could detect more prostate cancer

MRI scan before biopsy could detect more prostate cancer MRI scan before biopsy could detect more prostate cancer Discover Portal Discover Portal MRI scan before biopsy could detect more prostate cancer Published on 7 March 2017 doi: In men with a raised prostate specific antigen (PSA) blood test, which can be a sign of prostate cancer, MRI scanning before standard biopsy could allow more targeted biopsies and increase diagnosis of medium and high-risk prostate cancer. In this NIHR-funded study (...) , 576 men with suspected prostate cancer received a multi-parametric (MP)-MRI scan in addition to transrectal ultrasound-guided (TRUS) biopsy. They also had template mapping (TPM) biopsy of the entire prostate to reliably diagnose cancer. Neither MP-MRI scan nor TRUS-biopsy were entirely accurate. However, if MP-MRI is used as an initial test, followed by TRUS-biopsy targeted at areas identified on the scan, 18% more cancers could be detected than by TRUS biopsy alone. It may also help avoid

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

16. Large ten-year trial on treatment of localised prostate cancer will aid management decisions

Large ten-year trial on treatment of localised prostate cancer will aid management decisions Large ten-year trial on treatment of localised prostate cancer will aid management decisions Discover Portal Discover Portal Large ten-year trial on treatment of localised prostate cancer will aid management decisions Published on 15 September 2016 doi: New, long-term research indicates that active monitoring, with prompt treatment if needed, may be a better option than radical surgery or radiotherapy (...) for many men who have prostate cancer if it’s confined to the prostate gland. In the ProtecT trial, after an average of ten years, few men died of prostate cancer and there was no difference in survival between men receiving active monitoring and those who had radical treatments (which caused unpleasant side effects). But active monitoring did increase the risk of cancer progressing or spreading to other parts of the body. Longer follow-up will help to fully understand the balance between treatments

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

17. Bone-targeting drugs improve quality of life, but not survival in prostate cancer that has spread to bone

Bone-targeting drugs improve quality of life, but not survival in prostate cancer that has spread to bone Bone-targeting drugs improve quality of life, but not survival in prostate cancer that has spread to bone Discover Portal Discover Portal Bone-targeting drugs improve quality of life, but not survival in prostate cancer that has spread to bone Published on 27 September 2016 doi: The drug zoledronic acid delayed the onset of bone complications by two months in men with prostate cancer (...) strontium-89 to treat prostate cancer that has spread to the bone, but not zoledronic acid unless other treatment has failed due to costs. The branded version of zoledronic acid did not give value for money but cheaper generic versions, now available, could be a better use of NHS resources. Share your views on the research. Why was this study needed? Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer deaths in men in the UK. Just over 10,000 men died from prostate cancer in 2009. The rate has

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

18. Single routine offer of a blood test for prostate cancer did not save lives

Single routine offer of a blood test for prostate cancer did not save lives Single routine offer of a blood test for prostate cancer did not save lives Discover Portal Discover Portal Single routine offer of a blood test for prostate cancer did not save lives Published on 12 June 2018 doi: Offering all men aged 50 to 69 a single, screening prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test did not prevent deaths from prostate cancer. This large trial included 573 UK general practices and over 400,000 (...) men. It found that men who were invited to have a PSA test were 19% more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer, but no less likely to die from the condition, over an average 10 years of follow up. Forty per cent of men took up the offer. Controversy over PSA testing has persisted for many years. Two previous trials have had conflicting findings about whether repeated PSA testing reduces prostate cancer deaths. In addition, concerns about test accuracy, over-diagnosis and over-treatment have

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

19. Factors in men’s choice of active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer

Factors in men’s choice of active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer Factors in men’s choice of active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer Discover Portal Discover Portal Factors in men’s choice of active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer Published on 7 August 2018 doi: Many personal, organisational and national factors can help or hinder men from choosing active surveillance over radical treatment when they have low-risk prostate cancer. Men are more likely to adhere (...) to this plan of regular monitoring if they and their families are fully informed and understand that it includes the option of further treatment if necessary. The recent ProtecT trial demonstrated that there was no difference in 10-year survival rates between men with low risk localised prostate cancer who were allocated to active surveillance and those who chose radical treatment. This is important because radical treatment carries the risk of side effects, such as incontinence and erectile dysfunction

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

20. Radiotherapy benefits some men whose prostate cancer has spread to their bones

Radiotherapy benefits some men whose prostate cancer has spread to their bones Radiotherapy benefits some men whose prostate cancer has spread to their bones Discover Portal Discover Portal Radiotherapy benefits some men whose prostate cancer has spread to their bones Published on 22 January 2019 doi: Adding radiotherapy directed at the prostate to hormone treatment for all men with metastatic prostate cancer makes no difference to overall survival. However, when men with a limited number (...) of metastases confined to the bones of the pelvis and spine are treated with radiotherapy to the prostate, their survival improves. The standard treatment for men with metastatic prostate cancer is anti-androgen hormone therapy, and this is sometimes combined with chemotherapy. Radiotherapy of the prostate itself is only usually used for symptom relief. This NIHR part-funded trial compared the effects of standard care with or without radiotherapy to the prostate on overall survival for over 2,000 men

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre