Latest & greatest articles for prostate cancer

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Top results for prostate cancer

1. Large ten-year trial on treatment of localised prostate cancer will aid management decisions

Large ten-year trial on treatment of localised prostate cancer will aid management decisions Signal - Large ten-year trial on treatment of localised prostate cancer will aid management decisions Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Large ten-year trial on treatment of localised prostate cancer will aid management decisions Published on 15 September 2016 New, long-term research indicates that active monitoring, with prompt treatment if needed, may be a better option than radical (...) surgery or radiotherapy for many men who have prostate cancer if it’s confined to the prostate gland. In the ProtecT trial, after an average of ten years, few men died of prostate cancer and there was no difference in survival between men receiving active monitoring and those who had radical treatments (which caused unpleasant side effects). But active monitoring did increase the risk of cancer progressing or spreading to other parts of the body. Longer follow-up will help to fully understand

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

2. Bone-targeting drugs improve quality of life, but not survival in prostate cancer that has spread to bone

Bone-targeting drugs improve quality of life, but not survival in prostate cancer that has spread to bone Signal - Bone-targeting drugs improve quality of life, but not survival in prostate cancer that has spread to bone Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Bone-targeting drugs improve quality of life, but not survival in prostate cancer that has spread to bone Published on 27 September 2016 The drug zoledronic acid delayed the onset of bone complications by two months in men (...) with prostate cancer that had spread to the bone. Though it did not increase overall survival, it improved quality of life by reducing important complications such as fractures and spinal cord compression. The radioactive drug strontium-89 was also tested and delayed the combined outcome of bone-related complications, pain or death by about one month. It also had no effect on overall survival or the number of bone complications. Both treatments were compared with chemotherapy alone. Current NICE guidance

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

3. Men feel physically and psychologically ill-prepared for prostate cancer surgery

Men feel physically and psychologically ill-prepared for prostate cancer surgery Signal - Men feel physically and psychologically ill-prepared for prostate cancer surgery Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Men feel physically and psychologically ill-prepared for prostate cancer surgery Published on 28 November 2017 Following prostate cancer surgery men often experience physical changes, such as urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, causing negative emotions (...) and distress. This review found that men felt poorly prepared – psychologically and physically – for the changes they might experience after surgery. Surgery was often described as "life-changing", and men described worrying about their future. NICE recommend that men and their partners/carers are fully informed about prostate cancer treatment options and their possible complications, and are supported in decision-making. This includes having access to psychosexual support at any time. This global review

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

4. MRI scan before biopsy could detect more prostate cancer

MRI scan before biopsy could detect more prostate cancer Signal - MRI scan before biopsy could detect more prostate cancer Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover MRI scan before biopsy could detect more prostate cancer Published on 7 March 2017 In men with a raised prostate specific antigen (PSA) blood test, which can be a sign of prostate cancer, MRI scanning before standard biopsy could allow more targeted biopsies and increase diagnosis of medium and high-risk prostate cancer (...) . In this NIHR-funded study, 576 men with suspected prostate cancer received a multi-parametric (MP)-MRI scan in addition to transrectal ultrasound-guided (TRUS) biopsy. They also had template mapping (TPM) biopsy of the entire prostate to reliably diagnose cancer. Neither MP-MRI scan nor TRUS-biopsy were entirely accurate. However, if MP-MRI is used as an initial test, followed by TRUS-biopsy targeted at areas identified on the scan, 18% more cancers could be detected than by TRUS biopsy alone. It may also

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

5. Factors in men’s choice of active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer

Factors in men’s choice of active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer Factors in men’s choice of active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Factors in men’s choice of active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer Published on 7 August 2018 doi: Many personal, organisational and national factors can help or hinder men from choosing active surveillance over radical treatment when they have low-risk prostate cancer. Men are more (...) likely to adhere to this plan of regular monitoring if they and their families are fully informed and understand that it includes the option of further treatment if necessary. The recent ProtecT trial demonstrated that there was no difference in 10-year survival rates between men with low risk localised prostate cancer who were allocated to active surveillance and those who chose radical treatment. This is important because radical treatment carries the risk of side effects, such as incontinence

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

6. Single routine offer of a blood test for prostate cancer did not save lives

Single routine offer of a blood test for prostate cancer did not save lives Single routine offer of a blood test for prostate cancer did not save lives Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Single routine offer of a blood test for prostate cancer did not save lives Published on 12 June 2018 Offering all men aged 50 to 69 a single, screening prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test did not prevent deaths from prostate cancer. This large trial included 573 UK general practices (...) and over 400,000 men. It found that men who were invited to have a PSA test were 19% more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer, but no less likely to die from the condition, over an average 10 years of follow up. Forty per cent of men took up the offer. Controversy over PSA testing has persisted for many years. Two previous trials have had conflicting findings about whether repeated PSA testing reduces prostate cancer deaths. In addition, concerns about test accuracy, over-diagnosis and over

NIHR Dissemination Centre2019

7. Salvage Lymph Node Dissection for Nodal Recurrent Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review

Salvage Lymph Node Dissection for Nodal Recurrent Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review 30391078 2018 11 04 1873-7560 2018 Oct 31 European urology Eur. Urol. Salvage Lymph Node Dissection for Nodal Recurrent Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review. S0302-2838(18)30836-4 10.1016/j.eururo.2018.10.041 Identification of early nodal recurrence after primary prostate cancer (PCa) treatment by functional imaging may guide metastasis-directed therapy such as salvage lymph node dissection (SLND). The aim (...) the oncological impact of SLND on long-term endpoints. When imaging identifies exclusive nodal recurrent prostate cancer, surgery directed to the positive lesions is safe and can offer at least a temporary biochemical response. The oncological role assessed by strong clinical endpoints remains uncertain. Copyright © 2018 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Ploussard Guillaume G Department of Urology, Saint Jean Languedoc/La Croix du Sud Hospital, and Institut

EvidenceUpdates2019

8. Results of Prostate Cancer Screening in a Unique Cohort at 19yr of Follow-up

Results of Prostate Cancer Screening in a Unique Cohort at 19yr of Follow-up 30420254 2018 11 13 1873-7560 2018 Nov 09 European urology Eur. Urol. Results of Prostate Cancer Screening in a Unique Cohort at 19yr of Follow-up. S0302-2838(18)30851-0 10.1016/j.eururo.2018.10.053 We assessed the effect of screening in the European Randomized study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) Rotterdam pilot 1 study cohort with men randomized in 1991-1992. A total of 1134 men were randomized on a 1:1 (...) basis to a screening (S) and control (C) arm after prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing (PSA ≥10.0ng/ml was excluded from randomization). Further PSA testing was offered to all men in the S-arm with 4-yr intervals starting at age 55yr and screened up to the age of 74yr. Overall, a PSA level of ≥3.0ng/ml triggered biopsy. At time of analysis, 63% of men had died. Overall relative risk of metastatic (M+) disease and prostate cancer (PCa) death was 0.46 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.19-1.11

EvidenceUpdates2019

9. Radical Prostatectomy or Watchful Waiting in Prostate Cancer - 29-Year Follow-up.

Radical Prostatectomy or Watchful Waiting in Prostate Cancer - 29-Year Follow-up. BACKGROUND: Radical prostatectomy reduces mortality among men with clinically detected localized prostate cancer, but evidence from randomized trials with long-term follow-up is sparse. METHODS: We randomly assigned 695 men with localized prostate cancer to watchful waiting or radical prostatectomy from October 1989 through February 1999 and collected follow-up data through 2017. Cumulative incidence and relative (...) risks with 95% confidence intervals for death from any cause, death from prostate cancer, and metastasis were estimated in intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses, and numbers of years of life gained were estimated. We evaluated the prognostic value of histopathological measures with a Cox proportional-hazards model. RESULTS: By December 31, 2017, a total of 261 of the 347 men in the radical-prostatectomy group and 292 of the 348 men in the watchful-waiting group had died; 71 deaths

NEJM2018

10. Padeliporfin for untreated localised prostate cancer

Padeliporfin for untreated localised prostate cancer P Padeliporfin for untreated localised adeliporfin for untreated localised prostate cancer prostate cancer T echnology appraisal guidance Published: 21 November 2018 nice.org.uk/guidance/ta546 © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guidance represent the view of NICE, arrived at after (...) and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Padeliporfin for untreated localised prostate cancer (TA546) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 2 of 17Contents Contents 1 Recommendations 4 2 Information about padeliporfin 6 3 Committee discussion 7

National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Technology Appraisals2018

11. Comparison of the Prognostic Utility of the Cell Cycle Progression Score for Predicting Clinical Outcomes in African American and Non-African American Men with Localized Prostate Cancer

Comparison of the Prognostic Utility of the Cell Cycle Progression Score for Predicting Clinical Outcomes in African American and Non-African American Men with Localized Prostate Cancer 30391079 2018 11 04 1873-7560 2018 Oct 31 European urology Eur. Urol. Comparison of the Prognostic Utility of the Cell Cycle Progression Score for Predicting Clinical Outcomes in African American and Non-African American Men with Localized Prostate Cancer. S0302-2838(18)30816-9 10.1016/j.eururo.2018.10.028 (...) Better prostate cancer risk stratification is necessary to inform medical management, especially for African American (AA) men, for whom outcomes are particularly uncertain. To evaluate the utility of both a cell cycle progression (CCP) score and a clinical cell-cycle risk (CCR) score to predict clinical outcomes in a large cohort of men with prostate cancer highly enriched in an AA patient population. Patients were diagnosed with clinically localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate and treated

EvidenceUpdates2018

12. Sequence of hormonal therapy and radiotherapy field size in unfavourable, localised prostate cancer (NRG/RTOG 9413): long-term results of a randomised, phase 3 trial

Sequence of hormonal therapy and radiotherapy field size in unfavourable, localised prostate cancer (NRG/RTOG 9413): long-term results of a randomised, phase 3 trial 30316827 2018 12 03 1474-5488 19 11 2018 Nov The Lancet. Oncology Lancet Oncol. Sequence of hormonal therapy and radiotherapy field size in unfavourable, localised prostate cancer (NRG/RTOG 9413): long-term results of a randomised, phase 3 trial. 1504-1515 S1470-2045(18)30528-X 10.1016/S1470-2045(18)30528-X The NRG/RTOG 9413 study (...) showed that whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) plus neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (NHT) improved progression-free survival in patients with intermediate-risk or high-risk localised prostate cancer compared with prostate only radiotherapy (PORT) plus NHT, WPRT plus adjuvant hormonal therapy (AHT), and PORT plus AHT. We provide a long-term update after 10 years of follow-up of the primary endpoint (progression-free survival) and report on the late toxicities of treatment. The trial was designed as a 2 × 2

EvidenceUpdates2018

13. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer ');//--> ');//--> Search in: Menu COOKIES REQUIRED In order to access this website, please configure your browser to support cookies. ASCO Family of Sites Journals Publications Education Other Sites 2318 Mill Road, Suite 800, Alexandria, VA 22314 © 2018 American Society of Clinical Oncology |

American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines2018

14. A Prospective Adaptive Utility Trial to Validate Performance of a Novel Urine Exosome Gene Expression Assay to Predict High-grade Prostate Cancer in Patients with Prostate-specific Antigen 2-10ng/ml at Initial Biopsy

A Prospective Adaptive Utility Trial to Validate Performance of a Novel Urine Exosome Gene Expression Assay to Predict High-grade Prostate Cancer in Patients with Prostate-specific Antigen 2-10ng/ml at Initial Biopsy 30237023 2018 11 17 1873-7560 74 6 2018 Dec European urology Eur. Urol. A Prospective Adaptive Utility Trial to Validate Performance of a Novel Urine Exosome Gene Expression Assay to Predict High-grade Prostate Cancer in Patients with Prostate-specific Antigen 2-10ng/ml at Initial (...) Biopsy. 731-738 S0302-2838(18)30604-3 10.1016/j.eururo.2018.08.019 Discriminating indolent from clinically significant prostate cancer (PCa) in the initial biopsy setting remains an important issue. Prospectively evaluated diagnostic assays are necessary to ensure efficacy and clinical adoption. Performance and utility assessment of ExoDx Prostate (IntelliScore) (EPI) urine exosome gene expression assay versus standard clinical parameters for discriminating Grade Group (GG) ≥2 PCa from GG1 PCa

EvidenceUpdates2018

15. Systematic Review of Systemic Therapies and Therapeutic Combinations with Local Treatments for High-risk Localized Prostate Cancer

Systematic Review of Systemic Therapies and Therapeutic Combinations with Local Treatments for High-risk Localized Prostate Cancer 30286948 2018 10 05 1873-7560 2018 Oct 01 European urology Eur. Urol. Systematic Review of Systemic Therapies and Therapeutic Combinations with Local Treatments for High-risk Localized Prostate Cancer. S0302-2838(18)30549-9 10.1016/j.eururo.2018.07.027 Systemic therapies, combined with local treatment for high-risk prostate cancer, are recommended (...) by the international guidelines for specific subgroups of patients; however, for many of the clinical scenarios, it remains a research field. To perform a systematic review, and describe current evidence and perspectives about the multimodal treatment of high-risk prostate cancer. We performed a systematic review of PubMED, Embase, Cochrane Library, European Society of Medical Oncology/American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual proceedings, and clinicalTrial.gov between January 2010 and February 2018 following

EvidenceUpdates2018

16. Report from the ESMO 2018 presidential symposium—Radiotherapy to the primary tumour for men with newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer: survival results from STAMPEDE

Report from the ESMO 2018 presidential symposium—Radiotherapy to the primary tumour for men with newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer: survival results from STAMPEDE 30430023 2018 11 15 2059-7029 3 6 2018 ESMO open ESMO Open Report from the ESMO 2018 presidential symposium-Radiotherapy to the primary tumour for men with newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer: survival results from STAMPEDE. e000451 10.1136/esmoopen-2018-000451 Parker Chris C The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust (...) , Sutton, UK. The Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, UK. eng Journal Article 2018 10 21 England ESMO Open 101690685 2059-7029 podcast Competing interests: None declared. 2018 10 04 2018 10 04 2018 11 16 6 0 2018 11 16 6 0 2018 11 16 6 1 epublish 30430023 10.1136/esmoopen-2018-000451 esmoopen-2018-000451 PMC6215689

ESMO open2018 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

17. Radiotherapy to the primary tumour for newly diagnosed, metastatic prostate cancer (STAMPEDE): a randomised controlled phase 3 trial.

Radiotherapy to the primary tumour for newly diagnosed, metastatic prostate cancer (STAMPEDE): a randomised controlled phase 3 trial. BACKGROUND: Based on previous findings, we hypothesised that radiotherapy to the prostate would improve overall survival in men with metastatic prostate cancer, and that the benefit would be greatest in patients with a low metastatic burden. We aimed to compare standard of care for metastatic prostate cancer, with and without radiotherapy. METHODS: We did (...) a randomised controlled phase 3 trial at 117 hospitals in Switzerland and the UK. Eligible patients had newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer. We randomly allocated patients open-label in a 1:1 ratio to standard of care (control group) or standard of care and radiotherapy (radiotherapy group). Randomisation was stratified by hospital, age at randomisation, nodal involvement, WHO performance status, planned androgen deprivation therapy, planned docetaxel use (from December, 2015), and regular aspirin

Lancet2018

18. Taxane-based chemohormonal therapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

Taxane-based chemohormonal therapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. BACKGROUND: There has been considerable development in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer over the last decade. A number of agents, including docetaxel, cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide and sipuleucel-T, have been reported to improve outcomes in men with castration-resistant disease and their use is being explored in hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects (...) of early taxane-based chemohormonal therapy for newly diagnosed, metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. SEARCH METHODS: We performed a comprehensive search using multiple databases (the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus, Google Scholar, and Web of Science), trials registries, other sources of grey literature, and conference proceedings, up to 10 August 2018. We applied no restrictions on publication language or status. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomized or quasi-randomized

Cochrane2018

19. Partial ablation versus radical prostatectomy in intermediate-risk prostate cancer: the PART feasibility RCT

Partial ablation versus radical prostatectomy in intermediate-risk prostate cancer: the PART feasibility RCT Partial ablation versus radical prostatectomy in intermediate-risk prostate cancer: the PART feasibility RCT Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you (...) need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} Randomisation of men to a RCT comparing partial prostate ablation and radical prostatectomy is feasible. {{author}} {{($index , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , & . Freddie C Hamdy 1, * , Daisy Elliott 2 , Steffi le Conte 1 , Lucy C Davies 3 , Richéal M Burns 3 , Claire Thomson 1 , Richard Gray 3 , Jane Wolstenholme 3 , Jenny L Donovan 2, 4 , Ray Fitzpatrick 3 , Clare Verrill 1 , Fergus

NIHR HTA programme2018

20. Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer American Urological Association - American Urological Association - advertisement Toggle navigation About Us Membership AUA Governance Industry Relations Education AUAUniversity Education Products & Resources Normal Histology and Important Histo-anatomic Structures Urinary Bladder Prostate Kidney Renovascular Diseases Andrenal Gland Testis Paratesticular Tumors Penis Retroperitoneum Cytology Online Learning Live Learning For Medical Students Exams/LLL (...) of Care Accreditations and Reporting Patient Education Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Published 2013; Amended 2018 Clinicians are challenged with a multitude of treatment options for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). To assist in clinical decision-making, six index patients were developed representing the most common clinical scenarios that are encountered in clinical practice. With these patients in mind, guideline statements were developed to provide a rational basis

American Urological Association2018