Latest & greatest articles for pregnancy

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Top results for pregnancy

161. RCN Termination of Pregnancy (Induced Abortion)

RCN Termination of Pregnancy (Induced Abortion) POSITION STATEMENT RCN Termination of Pregnancy (Induced Abortion) 2013TERMINATION OF PREGNANCY (INDUCED ABORTION) POSITION STATEMENT 2 Background The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) is the voice of nursing across the UK and is the largest professional union of nursing staff in the world. The RCN promotes the interests of nursing staff and patients on a wide range of issues and helps shape health care policy by working closely with the UK (...) Government and other national and international institutions, trade unions, professional bodies and voluntary organisations. The current legislation which governs the issues of how a termination of pregnancy takes place comes from the Abortion Act 1967 , which was revised and updated in the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990. The Act covers England, Scotland and Wales but does not apply to Northern Ireland*. This and other related legislation and regulations can be found on Legislation.gov.uk

Royal College of Nursing2018

162. Nausea and vomiting in pregnancy

Nausea and vomiting in pregnancy Nausea and vomiting in pregnancy - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Nausea and vomiting in pregnancy Last reviewed: August 2018 Last updated: March 2018 Summary Affects approximately 75% of pregnant women. Typically begins between the fourth and seventh week after the last menstrual period and resolves in the second trimester. Aetiology remains unclear. There is some (...) evidence that it is related to hormone levels of human chorionic gonadotrophin and oestrogen. Hyperemesis gravidarum represents the most severe form of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy. While there is lack of consensus of definition, most agree that clinical features include persistent vomiting, volume depletion, ketosis, electrolyte disturbances, and weight loss. Initial therapy should be conservative. This may include non-pharmacological treatments such as diet modification, emotional support, ginger

BMJ Best Practice2018

163. Assessment of abdominal pain in pregnancy

Assessment of abdominal pain in pregnancy Assessment of abdominal pain in pregnancy - Differential diagnosis of symptoms | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Assessment of abdominal pain in pregnancy Last reviewed: August 2018 Last updated: June 2018 Summary Abdominal pain throughout pregnancy is common. Many adaptive or physiological changes of pregnancy affect the presentation. Women tend to visit doctors often as they are concerned about (...) the health of their fetus. Patients require a careful assessment in order to reduce anxiety and give reassurance. If the clinical picture is unclear, a specialist should be consulted. Chamberlain G. ABC of antenatal care: abdominal pain in pregnancy. BMJ. 1991;302:390-1394. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1670063/pdf/bmj00129-0073.pdf http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2059722?tool=bestpractice.com Augustin G, Majerovic M. Non-obstetrical acute abdomen during pregnancy. Eur J Obstet Gynecol

BMJ Best Practice2018

164. Molar pregnancies

Molar pregnancies Molar pregnancies - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Molar pregnancies Last reviewed: August 2018 Last updated: March 2018 Summary Chromosomally abnormal pregnancies that have the potential to become malignant. Higher possibility of gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) for women less than 20 years of age or over 35 years of age, and in those who have experienced GTD in a previous (...) pregnancy. Most common presenting symptom is vaginal bleeding. Suction dilation and evacuation (D&E) or hysterectomy are the preferred treatments. The risk of post-molar neoplasm is almost 20% for those with complete molar pregnancy. Rate of cure for post-molar gestational trophoblastic neoplasia exceeds 95%, often with preservation of fertility. Definition Hydatidiform moles are chromosomally abnormal pregnancies that have the potential to become malignant (gestational trophoblastic neoplasia

BMJ Best Practice2018

165. Overview of pregnancy complications

Overview of pregnancy complications Overview of pregnancy complications - Summary of relevant conditions | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Overview of pregnancy complications Last reviewed: August 2018 Last updated: June 2018 Introduction Complications in pregnancy can result from conditions that are specifically linked to the pregnant state as well as conditions that commonly arise or occur incidentally in women who are pregnant. Serious (...) sequelae might include miscarriage, pre-term labour or premature rupture of membranes, premature birth, stillbirth, low birth weight, macrosomia, birth defects, and infant and maternal morbidity or death. Complications affecting mother and fetus may arise at any stage of pregnancy, during labour, or postpartum. Related conditions Condition Description Regular antenatal care/screening is a key component of a healthy pregnancy. Nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (NVP), commonly referred to as morning

BMJ Best Practice2018

166. HIV infection in pregnancy

HIV infection in pregnancy HIV infection in pregnancy - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  HIV infection in pregnancy Last reviewed: August 2018 Last updated: June 2018 Important updates US guidance now recommends consideration of intrapartum zidovudine in women with detectable viral loads <1000 copies/mL Updated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs in pregnant women with HIV infection have been (...) reported an increased risk of serious neural tube defects in women who became pregnant while taking dolutegravir-based regimens. The risk appears to be highest in women taking the drug at the time of becoming pregnant or early in the first trimester. It is recommended that women of childbearing age with HIV currently taking dolutegravir are counselled about this new potential risk. Pregnant women currently taking dolutegravir should not stop their treatment but should discuss the possible risks

BMJ Best Practice2018

167. Ectopic pregnancy

Ectopic pregnancy Ectopic pregnancy - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Ectopic pregnancy Last reviewed: August 2018 Last updated: January 2018 Summary Typically presents 6-8 weeks after last normal menstrual period, but can present earlier or later. Risk increases with prior ectopic pregnancy, tubal surgery, history of sexually transmitted infections, smoking, in vitro fertilisation, or if pregnant (...) of referred pain from intraperitoneal blood. Definition A fertilised ovum implanting and maturing outside of the uterine endometrial cavity, with the most common site being the fallopian tube (97%), followed by the ovary (3.2%) and the abdomen (1.3%). Bouyer J, Coste J, Fernandez H, et al. Sites of ectopic pregnancy: a 10 year population-based study of 1800 cases. Hum Reprod. 2002 Dec;17(12):3224-30. http://humrep.oxfordjournals.org/content/17/12/3224.full http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12456628?tool

BMJ Best Practice2018

168. Effect of Cervical Pessary on Spontaneous Preterm Birth in Women With Singleton Pregnancies and Short Cervical Length: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

Effect of Cervical Pessary on Spontaneous Preterm Birth in Women With Singleton Pregnancies and Short Cervical Length: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Importance: Spontaneous preterm birth is a major cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. It is unclear if a cervical pessary can reduce the risk of spontaneous preterm delivery. Objective: To test whether in asymptomatic women with singleton pregnancies and no prior spontaneous preterm birth but with short cervical length on transvaginal (...) of increased or new vaginal discharge (86.7% vs 46.0%; between-group difference, +40.7% [95% CI, +30.1%-+50.3%]; relative risk, 1.88 [95% CI, 1.57-2.27]). Conclusions and Relevance: Among women without prior spontaneous preterm birth who had asymptomatic singleton pregnancies and short transvaginal cervical length, use of a cervical pessary, compared with no pessary use, resulted in a lower rate of spontaneous preterm birth at less than 34 weeks of gestation. The results of this single-center, nonblinded

JAMA2017 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

169. A Data Model for Teleconsultation in Managing High-Risk Pregnancies: Design and Preliminary Evaluation

A Data Model for Teleconsultation in Managing High-Risk Pregnancies: Design and Preliminary Evaluation Appendix 1: Self-assessment checklist of specialists for teleconsultations Item No. Item description 1 The quality of patient-related data and information provided on this consultation is acceptable. 2 The volume of information presented in this consultation, to decide about the patient, is enough. 3 There is additional non-useful information in those provided about the patient. 4 Order

JMIR medical informatics2017 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

171. Point-of-Care Urine Pregnancy Screening in the Emergency Department: Diagnostic Accuracy, Clinical Utility, and Guidelines

Point-of-Care Urine Pregnancy Screening in the Emergency Department: Diagnostic Accuracy, Clinical Utility, and Guidelines Point-of-Care Urine Pregnancy Screening in the Emergency Department: Diagnostic Accuracy, Clinical Utility, and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Point-of-Care Urine Pregnancy Screening in the Emergency Department: Diagnostic Accuracy, Clinical Utility, and Guidelines Point-of-Care Urine Pregnancy Screening in the Emergency Department: Diagnostic Accuracy (...) , Clinical Utility, and Guidelines Published on: December 7, 2017 Project Number: RB1173-000 Product Line: Research Type: Other Diagnostics Report Type: Summary of Abstracts Result type: Report Question What is the diagnostic accuracy of point-of-care urine pregnancy screens for patients presenting to the emergency department? What is the clinical utility of point-of-care urine pregnancy screens for patients presenting to the emergency department? What are the evidence-based guidelines associated

Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review2017

172. A Medically Supervised Pregnancy Exercise Intervention in Obese Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial

A Medically Supervised Pregnancy Exercise Intervention in Obese Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial 29016485 2017 11 02 2017 11 02 1873-233X 130 5 2017 Nov Obstetrics and gynecology Obstet Gynecol A Medically Supervised Pregnancy Exercise Intervention in Obese Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial. 1001-1010 10.1097/AOG.0000000000002267 To evaluate whether an intensive, medically supervised exercise intervention improved maternal glycemia and gestational weight gain in obese pregnant women when (...) in the control group and 11 in the intervention group did not complete the trial at 6 weeks postpartum (P=.61), but 43 in each group attended the 24- to 28-week glucose screen. There were no baseline maternal differences between groups. Classes commenced at a mean of 13 4/7±1 2/7 weeks of gestation. In early pregnancy, 51.1% (n=45/88) had an elevated fasting plasma glucose (92-125 mg/dL). There was no difference in the mean fasting plasma glucose at 24-28 weeks of gestation: 90.0±9.0 mg/dL (n=43) compared

EvidenceUpdates2017

173. Guidelines on autopsy practice: Fetal autopsy (2nd trimester fetal loss and termination of pregnancy for congenital anomaly)

Guidelines on autopsy practice: Fetal autopsy (2nd trimester fetal loss and termination of pregnancy for congenital anomaly) Guidelines on autopsy practice: Fetal autopsy (2nd trimester fetal loss and termination of pregnancy for congenital anomaly) " data-position="right" > Favourites OK In this section In this section In this section In this section In this section In this section In this section In this section In this section In this section In this section In this section In this section (...) In this section In this section In this section In this section In this section In this section In this section Guidelines on autopsy practice: Fetal autopsy (2nd trimester fetal loss and termination of pregnancy for congenital anomaly) Guidelines on autopsy practice: Fetal autopsy (2nd trimester fetal loss and termination of pregnancy for congenital anomaly) June 2017 June 2017 The Royal College of Pathologists 4th Floor, 21 Prescot Street London, E1 8BB Tel: +44 (0) 20 7451 6700 Email: ©2017 The Royal

Royal College of Pathologists2017

174. Valproic acid and pregnancy

Valproic acid and pregnancy Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''In the December issue of Prescrire International: valproic acid and pregnancy'', 1 December 2017 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > In the December issue of Prescrire International: valproic acid and pregnancy Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight In the December issue of Prescrire (...) International: valproic acid and pregnancy FREE DOWNLOAD A recently released study estimates that several thousand children in France who were exposed in utero to valproic acid or one of its derivatives between 1967 and 2016 were affected by at least one major congenital malformation. Full text available for free download. Summary In April 2017, the results of a French study of exposure to valproic acid or one of its derivatives (semisodium valproate and valpromide) during pregnancy and its consequences

Prescrire2017

175. Trends in Obstetric Intervention and Pregnancy Outcomes of Canadian Women With Diabetes in Pregnancy From 2004 to 2015

Trends in Obstetric Intervention and Pregnancy Outcomes of Canadian Women With Diabetes in Pregnancy From 2004 to 2015 ISSN 2472-1972 Trends in Obstetric Intervention and PregnancyOutcomesofCanadianWomen With Diabetes in Pregnancy From 2004 to 2015 Amy Metcalfe, 1,2,3 Yasser Sabr, 4,5 Jennifer A. Hutcheon, 4,6 Lois Donovan, 1,2 Janet Lyons, 4 Jason Burrows, 4 and K. S. Joseph 4,6 1 Departmentof Obstetrics and Gynecology, University ofCalgary,Calgary, AlbertaT2N2T9,Canada; 2 Department (...) andthehighestratesofadverseperinataloutcomesfollowedbywomenwithtype2diabetesmellitusand women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Rates of severe preeclampsia were 1.2% among women withoutdiabetesmellitus,2.1%amongwomenwithgestationaldiabetesmellitus,4.2%amongwomen withtype2diabetesmellitus,and7.5%amongwomenwithtype1diabetesmellitus(P,0.001).Therate ofneonatalmorbidityrangedfrom8.7%inwomenwithoutdiabetesmellitusto11.0%,17.4%,and24.1% in women with gestational, type 2, and type 1 diabetes mellitus, respectively (P, 0.001). Conclusions: In a contemporary obstetric population, women

Journal of the Endocrine Society2017 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

176. Health Care Students’ Attitudes About Alcohol Consumption During Pregnancy: Responses to Narrative Vignettes

Health Care Students’ Attitudes About Alcohol Consumption During Pregnancy: Responses to Narrative Vignettes SAGE Journals: Your gateway to world-class journal research MENU Sign In Institution Society Access Options You can be signed in via any or all of the methods shown below at the same time. My Profile Sign in here to access free tools such as favourites and alerts, or to access personal subscriptions Email (required) Password (required) Remember me I don't have a profile I am signed

Global qualitative nursing research2017 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

177. Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae Screening During Pregnancy for Canadian Women

Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae Screening During Pregnancy for Canadian Women Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae Screening During Pregnancy for Canadian Women | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae Screening During Pregnancy for Canadian Women Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae Screening During Pregnancy for Canadian Women Published on: November 9, 2017 Project Number: HT0023-000 Product Line: Result (...) type: Report Neisseria gonorrhoea (GC) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) are common, reportable, sexually transmitted infections of significant public health concern. Although GC and CT infection can be asymptomatic, the health risks to women include pelvic inflammatory disease, tubal infertility, ectopic pregnancy, endometriosis, and chronic pelvic pain. Of additional importance is that, in pregnant women, infection can be transmitted to the neonate during delivery and pose serious health risks

CADTH - Health Technology Assessment2017

178. Maternal Use of Antiepileptic Agents During Pregnancy and Major Congenital Malformations in Children.

Maternal Use of Antiepileptic Agents During Pregnancy and Major Congenital Malformations in Children. Clinical Question: Is maternal use of antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy associated with major congenital malformations in children? Bottom Line: Certain antiepileptic drugs were associated with increased rates of congenital malformations (eg, spina bifida, cardiac anomalies). Lamotrigine (2.31% in 4195 pregnancies) and levetiracetam (1.77% in 817 pregnancies) were associated with the lowest (...) risk and valproate was associated with the highest risk (10.93% in 2565 pregnancies) compared with the offspring of women without epilepsy (2.51% in 2154 pregnancies).

JAMA2017

179. Regimens of ultrasound surveillance for twin pregnancies for improving outcomes.

Regimens of ultrasound surveillance for twin pregnancies for improving outcomes. BACKGROUND: Increased ultrasound surveillance of twin pregnancies has become accepted practice due to the higher risk of complications. There is no current consensus however as to the method and frequency of ultrasound monitoring that constitutes optimal care. OBJECTIVES: To systematically review the effects of different types and frequency of ultrasound surveillance for women with a twin pregnancy on neonatal (...) , fetal and maternal outcomes. SEARCH METHODS: We searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register, ClinicalTrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (all searched 11 August 2017), and reference lists of retrieved studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised and quasi-randomised trials (including those published in abstract form) comparing the effects of described antenatal ultrasound surveillance regimens in twin pregnancies. Trials using a cluster-randomised

Cochrane2017

180. Prenatal administration of progestogens for preventing spontaneous preterm birth in women with a multiple pregnancy.

Prenatal administration of progestogens for preventing spontaneous preterm birth in women with a multiple pregnancy. BACKGROUND: Multiple pregnancy is a strong risk factor for preterm birth, and more than 50% of women with a twin pregnancy will give birth prior to 37 weeks' gestation. Infants born preterm are recognised to be at increased risk of many adverse health outcomes, contributing to more than half of overall perinatal mortality. Progesterone is produced naturally in the body and has (...) a role in maintaining pregnancy, although it is not clear whether administering progestogens to women with multiple pregnancy at high risk of early birth is effective and safe. OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of progesterone administration for the prevention of preterm birth in women with a multiple pregnancy. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register, ClinicalTrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (1

Cochrane2017