Latest & greatest articles for physiotherapy

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Top results for physiotherapy

421. Incentive spirometry versus routine chest physiotherapy for prevention of pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery. (Abstract)

Incentive spirometry versus routine chest physiotherapy for prevention of pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery. We entered 876 patients into a clinical trial aimed at preventing pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery. Patients either received conventional chest physiotherapy or were encouraged to perform maximal inspiratory manoeuvres for 5 min during each hour while awake, using an incentive spirometer. The incidence of pulmonary complications did not differ significantly (...) between the groups: incentive spirometry 68 of 431 (15.8%, 95% CI 14.0-17.6%), and chest physiotherapy 68 of 445 (15.3%, CI 13.6-17.0%). Nor was there a difference between the groups in the incidence of positive clinical signs, pyrexia, abnormal chest radiographs, pathogens in sputum, respiratory failure (PO2 less than 60 mm Hg), or length of stay in hospital. We conclude that prophylactic incentive spirometry and chest physiotherapy are of equivalent clinical efficacy in the general management

1991 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

422. Prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. A comparative study of exercise, calcium supplementation, and hormone-replacement therapy. (Abstract)

Prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. A comparative study of exercise, calcium supplementation, and hormone-replacement therapy. Osteoporosis among older women is a major public health problem. We studied the effects of three approaches to the prevention of osteoporosis in women with low bone density.One hundred twenty postmenopausal women (mean [+/- SD] age, 56 +/- 4) who were selected because they had low forearm bone density were enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled (...) , randomized study comparing the effects of an exercise regimen (exercise group, n = 41), exercise plus dietary calcium supplementation (exercise-calcium group, n = 39), and exercise plus continuous replacement of estrogen and progesterone (exercise-estrogen group, n = 40). Periodically during the two-year study period, we measured the women's bone density at three forearm sites, measured indexes of calcium metabolism, and recorded symptom scores. A comparison group of 42 women (mean age, 55.5 +/- 3.1

1991 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain

423. Exercise training combined with antihypertensive drug therapy. Effects on lipids, blood pressure, and left ventricular mass. (Abstract)

Exercise training combined with antihypertensive drug therapy. Effects on lipids, blood pressure, and left ventricular mass. We studied exercise training combined with the use of antihypertensive drugs and examined the following questions. (1) Are there additive antihypertensive benefits with exercise and drug therapy combined? (2) Does drug therapy limit exercise-induced lipid improvements? (3) Does exercise that includes weight training and walking/jogging affect the left ventricle? Fifty-two (...) , whereas the propranolol group changed in an opposite direction. In all groups, left ventricular mass increased with training, while diastolic function was unchanged. We conclude that (1) drug therapy provided no additive benefit to the antihypertensive effects of exercise, (2) propranolol limited improvements in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and (3) exercise did not adversely affect the left ventricle.

1990 JAMA Controlled trial quality: uncertain

424. The effects of physical therapy on cerebral palsy. A controlled trial in infants with spastic diplegia. (Abstract)

The effects of physical therapy on cerebral palsy. A controlled trial in infants with spastic diplegia. Legislatively mandated programs for early intervention on behalf of handicapped infants often stipulate the inclusion of physical therapy as a major component of treatment for cerebral palsy. To evaluate the effects of physical therapy, we randomly assigned 48 infants (12 to 19 months of age) with mild to severe spastic diplegia to receive either 12 months of physical therapy (Group A) or 6 (...) months of physical therapy preceded by 6 months of infant stimulation (Group B). The infant-stimulation program included motor, sensory, language, and cognitive activities of increasing complexity. Masked outcome assessment was performed after both 6 and 12 months of therapy to evaluate motor quotient, motor ability, and mental quotient. After six months, the infants in Group A had a lower mean motor quotient than those in Group B (49.1 vs. 58.1, P = 0.02) and were less likely to walk (12 vs. 35

1988 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain

425. Cost-effectiveness study of outpatient physiotherapy after medial meniscectomy

Absenteeism; Adolescent; Adult; Cartilage, Articular /surgery; Clinical Trials as Topic; Cost-Benefit Analysis; Humans; Knee Injuries /physiopathology; Knee Joint /surgery; Male; Middle Aged; Outpatients; Patients; Physical Therapy Modalities /economics; Postoperative Care /economics; Random Allocation AccessionNumber 21995005199 Date bibliographic record published 27/06/1996 Date abstract record published 27/06/1996 NHS Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED) Produced by the Centre for Reviews (...) Cost-effectiveness study of outpatient physiotherapy after medial meniscectomy Cost-effectiveness study of outpatient physiotherapy after medial meniscectomy Cost-effectiveness study of outpatient physiotherapy after medial meniscectomy Forster D P, Frost C E Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical

1982 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

426. Multicentre trial of physiotherapy in the management of sciatic symptoms. (Abstract)

Multicentre trial of physiotherapy in the management of sciatic symptoms. Four treatments for sciatic symptoms--traction, exercises, manipulation, and corset--were assessed in a randomised controlled trial in 322 outpatients. The design was factorial. There were thus sixteen treatment groups, enabling a comparison of combinations of methods as well as of individual methods. Treatment lasted for four weeks. Patients were reviewed at the end of this period and at four and sixteen months after (...) in combination. This was complemented by a clear tendency for those who had received fewer types of treatment during the trial to have further treatment in the ensuing three months. There were no beneficial effects of treatment detectable at four or sixteen months. In the short-term, active physiotherapy with several treatments appears to be of value in the outpatient management of patients with sciatic symptoms, but it does not seem to confer any longer-term benefit.

1981 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

427. Efficacy of chest physiotherapy and intermittent positive-pressure breathing in the resolution of pneumonia. (Abstract)

and prior antibiotic treatment. Antibiotic therapy, guided by Gram stain and sputum and blood cultures, was similar in both groups. Chest physiotherapy, consisting of postural drainage, percussion and vibration, was given concurrently with intermittent positive-pressure breathing with use of racemic epinephrine every four hours. There was no statistically significant difference in duration of fever, extent of radiographic clearing, duration of hospital stay and mortality between the control and treated (...) Efficacy of chest physiotherapy and intermittent positive-pressure breathing in the resolution of pneumonia. We undertook a randomized clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of chest physiotherapy and intermittent positive-pressure breathing in the treatment of pneumonia. The diagnosis of pneumonia required a compatible clinical history and x-ray confirmation. A total of 54 patients were assigned to treatment and control groups and were similar in age, smoking history, underlying lung disease

1978 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain