Latest & greatest articles for physical therapy

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Top results for physical therapy

101. A randomized trial of behavioral physical therapy interventions for acute and sub-acute low back pain Full Text available with Trip Pro

A randomized trial of behavioral physical therapy interventions for acute and sub-acute low back pain Psychological factors consistent with fear-avoidance models are associated with the development of chronic low back pain (LBP). As a result, graded activity (GA) and graded exposure (GX) have been suggested as behavioral treatment options. This clinical trial compared the effectiveness of treatment-based classification (TBC) physical therapy alone to TBC augmented with GA or GX for patients (...) with acute and sub-acute LBP. Our primary hypothesis was that GX would be most effective for those with elevated pain-related fear. In total, 108 patients enrolled in this clinical trial and were randomly assigned to receive TBC, GA, or GX. Outcomes were assessed by a blinded evaluator at 4 weeks and by mail at 6 months. The primary outcomes for this trial were disability and pain intensity, and the secondary outcomes were fear-avoidance beliefs, pain catastrophizing, and physical impairment. There were

2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

102. The effectiveness of manual physical therapy and exercise for mechanical neck pain: a randomized clinical trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

The effectiveness of manual physical therapy and exercise for mechanical neck pain: a randomized clinical trial Randomized clinical trial.To assess the effectiveness of manual physical therapy and exercise (MTE) for mechanical neck pain with or without unilateral upper extremity (UE) symptoms, as compared to a minimal intervention (MIN) approach.Mounting evidence supports the use of manual therapy and exercise for mechanical neck pain, but no studies have directly assessed its effectiveness (...) for UE symptoms.A total of 94 patients referred to 3 physical therapy clinics with a primary complaint of mechanical neck pain, with or without unilateral UE symptoms, were randomized to receive MTE or a MIN approach of advice, motion exercise, and subtherapeutic ultrasound. Primary outcomes were the neck disability index, cervical and UE pain visual analog scales (VAS), and patient-perceived global rating of change assessed at 3-, 6-, and 52-weeks. Secondary measures included treatment success rates

2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

103. Physical therapy treatment of back complaints on children and adolescents (Abstract)

Physical therapy treatment of back complaints on children and adolescents A randomized controlled trial was performed.To evaluate how 2 different treatment options affect perception of health, pain, and physical functioning over time among children and adolescents with low back pain (LBP).LBP among children and adolescents has increased. The literature shows that children with LBP also suffer from this condition as adults. Thus, it is important to prevent and treat LBP in children (...) and adolescents.Forty-five children and adolescents were consecutively randomized into one of 2 treatment groups and were studied for 12 weeks. Group 1 was given individualized physical therapy and exercise and a standardized self-training program and back education. Group 2 was given self-training program and back education but no individualized therapy. The children and adolescents were tested before and after the treatment period. Child Health Questionnaire Child Form 87, Roland & Morris Disability Questionnaire

2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

104. Isolated lumbar extensor strengthening versus regular physical therapy in an army working population with nonacute low back pain: a randomized controlled trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Isolated lumbar extensor strengthening versus regular physical therapy in an army working population with nonacute low back pain: a randomized controlled trial To evaluate the effectiveness of specific lumbar extensor training compared with regular physical therapy (PT) in workers with nonspecific nonacute low back pain (LBP).A multicenter randomized controlled trial with 1-year follow-up.PT department in (military primary care) health centers.Predominantly male soldiers (N=129) with 4 weeks (...) or more of low back complaints who were referred by the health center's general practitioner for PT (mean age, 35.9+/-10.8 y; range, 20-56 y), of whom 127 randomized participants were included in the analyses. One patient withdrew because of adverse effects during treatment.Participants were assigned to 1 of 2 treatment programs: (1) a 10-week device-supported isolated lumbar extension training, twice a week, or (2) regular PT, mainly consisting of exercise therapy and aerobic activities.Functional

2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

105. Effect of pediatric physical therapy on deformational plagiocephaly in children with positional preference: a randomized controlled trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of pediatric physical therapy on deformational plagiocephaly in children with positional preference: a randomized controlled trial To study the effect of pediatric physical therapy on positional preference and deformational plagiocephaly.Randomized controlled trial.Bernhoven Hospital, Veghel, the Netherlands.Of 380 infants referred to the examiners at age 7 weeks, 68 (17.9%) met criteria for positional preference, and 65 (17.1%) were enrolled and followed up at ages 6 and 12 (...) months.Infants with positional preference were randomly assigned to receive either physical therapy (n = 33) or usual care (n = 32).The primary outcome was severe deformational plagiocephaly assessed by plagiocephalometry. The secondary outcomes were positional preference, motor development, and cervical passive range of motion.Both groups were comparable at baseline. In the intervention group, the risk for severe deformational plagiocephaly was reduced by 46% at age 6 months (relative risk, 0.54; 95

2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

106. Comparison of 3 physical therapy modalities for acute pain in lumbar disc herniation measured by clinical evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging (Abstract)

Comparison of 3 physical therapy modalities for acute pain in lumbar disc herniation measured by clinical evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging This study measures and compares the outcome of traction, ultrasound, and low-power laser (LPL) therapies by using magnetic resonance imaging and clinical parameters in patients presenting with acute leg pain and low back pain caused by lumbar disc herniation (LDH).A total of 60 patients were enrolled in this study and randomly assigned into 1 of 3 (...) groups equally according to the therapies applied, either with traction, ultrasound, or LPL. Treatment consisted of 15 sessions over a period of 3 weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging examinations were done before and immediately after the treatment. Physical examination of the lumbar spine, severity of pain, functional disability by Roland Disability Questionnaire, and Modified Oswestry Disability Questionnaire were assessed at baseline, immediately after, and at 1 and 3 months after treatment.There

2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

107. Physical therapy interventions for patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: an overview of systematic reviews. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Physical therapy interventions for patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: an overview of systematic reviews. Patients with osteoarthritis of the knee are commonly treated by physical therapists. Practice should be informed by updated evidence from systematic reviews. The purpose of this article is to summarize the evidence from systematic reviews on the effectiveness of physical therapy for patients with knee osteoarthritis. Systematic reviews published between 2000 and 2007 were identified (...) by a comprehensive literature search. We graded the quality of evidence across reviews for each comparison and outcome. Twenty-three systematic reviews on physical therapy interventions for patients with knee osteoarthritis were included. There is high-quality evidence that exercise and weight reduction reduce pain and improve physical function in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. There is moderate-quality evidence that acupuncture, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and low-level laser therapy

2008 EvidenceUpdates

108. Mental wellbeing in over 65s: occupational therapy and physical activity interventions

Mental wellbeing in over 65s: occupational therapy and physical activity interventions Mental wellbeing in o Mental wellbeing in ov ver 65s: er 65s: occupational ther occupational therap apy and ph y and physical ysical activity interv activity interventions entions Public health guideline Published: 22 October 2008 nice.org.uk/guidance/ph16 © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our (...) of opportunity and to reduce health inequalities. Nothing in this guideline should be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with complying with those duties. Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Mental wellbeing in over 65s: occupational therapy and physical activity interventions (PH16) © NICE 2018. All rights

2008 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

109. Effectiveness of physical therapy treatments on lateral epicondylitis

Status Subject indexing assigned by NLM MeSH Evidence-Based Medicine; Humans; Physical Therapy Modalities; Tennis Elbow /physiopathology /therapy; Treatment Outcome AccessionNumber 12008106106 Date bibliographic record published 03/02/2009 Date abstract record published 22/07/2009 Record Status This is a critical abstract of a systematic review that meets the criteria for inclusion on DARE. Each critical abstract contains a brief summary of the review methods, results and conclusions followed (...) Effectiveness of physical therapy treatments on lateral epicondylitis Effectiveness of physical therapy treatments on lateral epicondylitis Effectiveness of physical therapy treatments on lateral epicondylitis Kohia M, Brackle J, Byrd K, Jennings A, Murray W, Wilfong E CRD summary The authors concluded that none of the numerous physical treatments for lateral epicondylitis was shown to be the most effective. Further research was required. The authors’ conclusions appeared to reflect limited

2008 DARE.

110. Effectiveness of physical therapy interventions for children with cerebral palsy: a systematic review

Effectiveness of physical therapy interventions for children with cerebral palsy: a systematic review Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2008 DARE.

111. WITHDRAWN: Physical therapies for prevention of urinary and faecal incontinence in adults. (Abstract)

WITHDRAWN: Physical therapies for prevention of urinary and faecal incontinence in adults. Physical therapies, particularly pelvic floor muscle training, have been recommended for prevention of incontinence associated with childbearing, and prostate surgery.To assess the effectiveness of physical therapies in preventing incontinence in adults.The Cochrane Incontinence Group trials register was searched to September 2001. Trials were also sought from the Reference Lists of relevant articles (...) and from experts in the field.Randomised and quasi-randomised trials in adults without incontinence symptoms that compared a physical therapy with no treatment, or any other treatment to prevent incontinence.Two reviewers independently assessed eligibility, trial quality and extracted data. Data were processed as described in the Cochrane Collaboration Handbook.Two trials in men (155 men) and 13 trials in women (4661 women) were included. As most trials recruited regardless of continence status

2007 Cochrane

112. Review: medical history, physical examination, and routine tests are useful for diagnosing heart failure in dyspnoea

Review: medical history, physical examination, and routine tests are useful for diagnosing heart failure in dyspnoea Review: medical history, physical examination, and routine tests are useful for diagnosing heart failure in dyspnoea | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your (...) username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: medical history, physical examination, and routine tests are useful for diagnosing heart failure in dyspnoea Article Text Diagnosis Review

2007 Evidence-Based Medicine

113. Impact of physical therapy for Parkinson's disease: a critical review of the literature

Impact of physical therapy for Parkinson's disease: a critical review of the literature Impact of physical therapy for Parkinson's disease: a critical review of the literature Impact of physical therapy for Parkinson's disease: a critical review of the literature Kwakkel G, de Goede C J, van Wegen E E CRD summary This review assessed the impact of physical therapy on patients with Parkinson's Disease and concluded that the tasks included in the interventions were not generalisable. Further (...) research was required. Studies were of limited quality and were diverse. The authors' appeared to take these factors into consideration and their conclusions are likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives To assess the impact of physical therapy on patients with Parkinson's disease. Searching MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE, PEDro, EMBASE and DocOnline were searched up to August 2007 for articles in English, German and Dutch

2007 DARE.

114. Evidence-based treatment of aquatic physical therapy in the rehabilitation of upper-extremity orthopedic injuries

Evidence-based treatment of aquatic physical therapy in the rehabilitation of upper-extremity orthopedic injuries Evidence-based treatment of aquatic physical therapy in the rehabilitation of upper-extremity orthopedic injuries Evidence-based treatment of aquatic physical therapy in the rehabilitation of upper-extremity orthopedic injuries Watts K E, Gangaway J M CRD summary This review aimed to identify the evidence on treating orthopaedic upper-extremity injuries with aquatic therapy (...) , and to specify any particularly useful techniques based on experimental studies. The authors concluded that there is some scientific evidence to support aquatic physical therapy as an intervention, but further research is needed. This was a poorly reported review and the conclusions should be treated with caution. Authors' objectives To identify the evidence on treating orthopaedic upper-extremity (UE) injuries with aquatic therapy, and to specify any particularly useful techniques based on experimental

2007 DARE.

115. Aquatic physical therapy for low back pain: what are the outcomes?

Aquatic physical therapy for low back pain: what are the outcomes? Aquatic physical therapy for low back pain: what are the outcomes? Aquatic physical therapy for low back pain: what are the outcomes? Barone D, Gangaway J M CRD summary This review concluded that aquatic physical therapy is effective in improving pain and a range of other outcomes inpatients with low back pain. However, the majority of the evidence was non-randomised, no validity assessment was conducted, and the review process (...) was poorly reported. It is therefore difficult to determine the reliability of the conclusions. Authors' objectives To assess the evidence for aquatic physical therapy (APT) for orthopaedic low back pain (LBP). Searching PubMed, PEDro, CINAHL, Hooked on Evidence and the Cochrane Library were searched. The aquatic therapy bibliography (APTA) was also searched and references were cross-checked. The search terms were reported but not the search dates. Only studies published in peer-reviewed journals were

2007 DARE.

116. Efficacy of percutaneous vertebral augmentation and use of physical therapy intervention following vertebral compression fractures in older adults: a systematic review

osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures of the lumbar or thoracic spine in older adults. Relevant outcomes included physical therapy, rehabilitation or functional outcomes. The included studies comprised a variety of study designs (non-randomised controlled trials, uncontrolled prospective and retrospective trials). Mean participant age ranged from 66 to 79 years. Outcomes reported included pain levels, medication use, function and quality of life. Included interventions comprised kyphoplasty (...) Efficacy of percutaneous vertebral augmentation and use of physical therapy intervention following vertebral compression fractures in older adults: a systematic review Efficacy of percutaneous vertebral augmentation and use of physical therapy intervention following vertebral compression fractures in older adults: a systematic review Efficacy of percutaneous vertebral augmentation and use of physical therapy intervention following vertebral compression fractures in older adults: a systematic

2007 DARE.

117. Biofeedback as an adjunct to physical therapy for recovery after stroke

Biofeedback as an adjunct to physical therapy for recovery after stroke Biofeedback as an adjunct to physical therapy for recovery after stroke Biofeedback as an adjunct to physical therapy for recovery after stroke Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Biofeedback as an adjunct to physical therapy for recovery after stroke. Lansdale: HAYES, Inc

2007 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

118. A brief pain management program compared with physical therapy for low back pain: results from an economic analysis alongside a randomized clinical trial

A brief pain management program compared with physical therapy for low back pain: results from an economic analysis alongside a randomized clinical trial Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2007 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

119. Treatment of low back pain by acupressure and physical therapy: randomised controlled trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Treatment of low back pain by acupressure and physical therapy: randomised controlled trial. To evaluate the effectiveness of acupressure in terms of disability, pain scores, and functional status.Randomised controlled trial.Orthopaedic clinic in Kaohsiung, Taiwan.129 patients with chronic low back pain.Acupressure or physical therapy for one month.Self administered Chinese versions of standard outcome measures for low back pain (primary outcome: Roland and Morris disability questionnaire (...) ) at baseline, after treatment, and at six month follow-up.The mean total Roland and Morris disability questionnaire score after treatment was significantly lower in the acupressure group than in the physical therapy group regardless of the difference in absolute score (- 3.8, 95% confidence interval - 5.7 to - 1.9) or mean change from the baseline (- 4.64, - 6.39 to - 2.89). Acupressure conferred an 89% (95% confidence interval 61% to 97%) reduction in significant disability compared with physical therapy

2006 BMJ Controlled trial quality: predicted high

120. Effectiveness of physical therapy for Achilles tendinopathy: an evidence based review of eccentric exercises

Effectiveness of physical therapy for Achilles tendinopathy: an evidence based review of eccentric exercises Effectiveness of physical therapy for Achilles tendinopathy: an evidence based review of eccentric exercises Effectiveness of physical therapy for Achilles tendinopathy: an evidence based review of eccentric exercises Satyendra L, Byl N CRD summary This review assessed the effectiveness of eccentric exercise training for patients with Achilles tendinopathy. The authors concluded (...) in the review. Specific interventions included in the review Studies that assessed eccentric exercise training, a physical therapy intervention, were eligible for inclusion. The patients in the included studies were given eccentric exercises, eccentric overload, eccentric/concentric stretching, or eccentric exercises and a splint for 12 weeks' duration. The control interventions, where present, were rest/surgery, exercise without pain, night splint and concentric exercises. Participants included

2006 DARE.