Latest & greatest articles for penicillin

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Top results for penicillin

2. Penicillin

Penicillin Top results for penicillin - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Turning Research Into Practice ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2 (...) ) and (#3 or #4) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for penicillin The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

3. The impact of dosing frequency on the efficacy of 10-day penicillin or amoxicillin therapy for streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis: a meta-analysis

The impact of dosing frequency on the efficacy of 10-day penicillin or amoxicillin therapy for streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis: a meta-analysis The impact of dosing frequency on the efficacy of 10-day penicillin or amoxicillin therapy for streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis: a meta-analysis The impact of dosing frequency on the efficacy of 10-day penicillin or amoxicillin therapy for streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis: a meta-analysis Lan A J, Colford J M Authors' objectives To compare cure (...) rates between once- or twice-daily (s.i.d. and b.i.d., respectively) and more frequent dosing schedules in the treatment of streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis. Searching MEDLINE and Dissertation Abstracts were searched to August 1998. For MEDLINE, the keywords were 'tonsillopharyngitis', 'pharyngitis', 'penicillin', 'amoxicillin' and 'clinical trials. For Dissertation Abstracts, combinations of the following words were used: 'streptococcus' or 'streptococcal' and 'penicillin' or 'amoxicillin

2000 DARE.

4. Are Short-Term Late-Generation Antibiotics Equivalent to Standard Penicillin Therapy in the Resolution of Symptoms in Acute Strep Throat in Children?

Are Short-Term Late-Generation Antibiotics Equivalent to Standard Penicillin Therapy in the Resolution of Symptoms in Acute Strep Throat in Children? Systematic Review Snapshot TAKE-HOME MESSAGE Although antibiotics are not the best agent for symptomatic management of streptococcal pharyngitis, according to limited data, short-course antibiotics appear to reduce the duration of symptoms more effectively than longer-course therapy. Are Short-Term Late-Generation Antibiotics Equivalent (...) to Standard Penicillin Therapy in the Resolution of Symptoms in Acute Strep Throat in Children? EBEM Commentators Anand Swaminathan, MD, MPH New York University School of Medicine/Bellevue Hospital Center Department of Emergency Medicine New York, NY Jeffrey Hom, MD, MPH Stony Brook University School of Medicine Departments of Pediatrics (Emergency) and Emergency Medicine Stony Brook, NY Results Table 1. Short (3 days) versus standard (7 days) antibiotic course. Symptom Number of Subjects Difference

2013 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

5. Evaluation and Management of Penicillin Allergy: A Review. (Abstract)

Evaluation and Management of Penicillin Allergy: A Review. β-Lactam antibiotics are among the safest and most effective antibiotics. Many patients report allergies to these drugs that limit their use, resulting in the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics that increase the risk for antimicrobial resistance and adverse events.Approximately 10% of the US population has reported allergies to the β-lactam agent penicillin, with higher rates reported by older and hospitalized patients. Although many (...) patients report that they are allergic to penicillin, clinically significant IgE-mediated or T lymphocyte-mediated penicillin hypersensitivity is uncommon (<5%). Currently, the rate of IgE-mediated penicillin allergies is decreasing, potentially due to a decreased use of parenteral penicillins, and because severe anaphylactic reactions to oral amoxicillin are rare. IgE-mediated penicillin allergy wanes over time, with 80% of patients becoming tolerant after a decade. Cross-reactivity between penicillin

2019 JAMA

6. Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis

Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Investing (...) boards Evidence Education * Associated Topics Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis Shukan Kanuga, DDS, MSD . Overview Systematic Review Conclusion Three to 6 days of short-term late-generation antibiotics have comparable treatment efficacy as a 10-day course of oral penicillin in children with acute group A β-hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS) pharyngitis. Critical Summary Assessment On the basis of good

2015 ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

7. Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis

Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Investing (...) boards Evidence Education * Associated Topics Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis Shukan Kanuga, DDS, MSD . Overview Systematic Review Conclusion Three to 6 days of short-term late-generation antibiotics have comparable treatment efficacy as a 10-day course of oral penicillin in children with acute group A β-hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS) pharyngitis. Critical Summary Assessment On the basis of good

2015 ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

8. Anaphylactic Cross-Reactivity Between Penicillin and Cephalosporin

Anaphylactic Cross-Reactivity Between Penicillin and Cephalosporin UTCAT848, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Minimal Risk Of Severe Type 1 Hypersensitivity Reaction To Third Generation Cephalosporin In Patients Who Experience Type 1 Hypersensitivity Reaction And Allergy To Penicillin Clinical Question Do patients who experience a severe type 1 hypersensitivity reaction to penicillin and demonstrate (...) an allergy to cephalosporin experience a severe type 1 hypersensitivity reaction to the cephalosporin? Clinical Bottom Line It appears that patients who have a severe type 1 hypersensitivity reaction to penicillin do not have an increased risk of anaphylaxis to cephalosporins. This evidence may be skewed however by adherence to the recommendation not to give cephalosporins to individuals with a history of penicillin anaphylaxis. (See Comments on the CAT below) Best Evidence (you may view more info

2011 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

9. Can pneumonia caused by penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae be treated with penicillin?

Can pneumonia caused by penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae be treated with penicillin? BestBets: Can pneumonia caused by penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae be treated with penicillin? Can pneumonia caused by penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae be treated with penicillin? Report By: V Clifford and M Tebruegge (joint first authors), M Vandeleur and Professor Nigel Curtis - Research Fellows Institution: Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of General Medicine (...) /Paediatrics, University of Melbourne; Murdoch Children's Research Institute. Australia. Date Submitted: 22nd January 2010 Date Completed: 11th February 2010 Last Modified: 12th February 2010 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [ child with pneumonia due to penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae] does [treatment with penicillin alone] result in [higher morbidity or mortality]? Clinical Scenario You are looking after a previously healthy 3-year-old girl, who was admitted

2010 BestBETS

10. Efficacy of high doses of penicillin versus amoxicillin in the treatment of uncomplicated community acquired pneumonia in adults. A non-inferiority controlled clinical trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Efficacy of high doses of penicillin versus amoxicillin in the treatment of uncomplicated community acquired pneumonia in adults. A non-inferiority controlled clinical trial. Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is treated with penicillin in some northern European countries.To evaluate whether high-dose penicillin V is as effective as high-dose amoxicillin for the treatment of non-severe CAP.Multicentre, parallel, double-blind, controlled, randomized clinical trial.31 primary care centers (...) in Spain.Patients from 18 to 75 years of age with no significant associated comorbidity and with symptoms of lower respiratory tract infection and radiological confirmation of CAP were randomized to receive either penicillin V 1.6 million units, or amoxicillin 1000mg three times per day for 10 days.The main outcome was clinical cure at 14 days, and the primary hypothesis was that penicillin V would be non-inferior to amoxicillin with regard to this outcome, with a margin of 15% for the difference in proportions

2019 Atencion Primaria Controlled trial quality: predicted high

11. Estimating Benzathine Penicillin Need for the Treatment of Pregnant Women Diagnosed with Syphilis during Antenatal Care in High-Morbidity Countries Full Text available with Trip Pro

Estimating Benzathine Penicillin Need for the Treatment of Pregnant Women Diagnosed with Syphilis during Antenatal Care in High-Morbidity Countries Congenital syphilis continues to be a preventable cause of global stillbirth and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Shortages of injectable penicillin, the only recommended treatment for pregnant women and infants with syphilis, have been reported by high-morbidity countries. We sought to estimate current and projected annual needs for benzathine (...) penicillin in antenatal care settings for 30 high morbidity countries that account for approximately 33% of the global burden of congenital syphilis.Proportions of antenatal care attendance, syphilis screening coverage in pregnancy, syphilis prevalence among pregnant women, and adverse pregnancy outcomes due to untreated maternal syphilis reported to WHO were applied to 2012 birth estimates for 30 high syphilis burden countries to estimate current and projected benzathine penicillin need for prevention

2016 PloS one

12. Risk of meticillin resistant <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> and <i>Clostridium difficile</i> in patients with a documented penicillin allergy: population based matched cohort study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Risk of meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile in patients with a documented penicillin allergy: population based matched cohort study. To evaluate the relation between penicillin allergy and development of meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and C difficile.Population based matched cohort study.United Kingdom general practice (1995-2015).301 399 adults without previous MRSA or C difficile enrolled in the Health Improvement Network (...) database: 64 141 had a penicillin allergy and 237 258 comparators matched on age, sex, and study entry time.The primary outcome was risk of incident MRSA and C difficile. Secondary outcomes were use of β lactam antibiotics and β lactam alternative antibiotics.Among 64 141 adults with penicillin allergy and 237 258 matched comparators, 1365 developed MRSA (442 participants with penicillin allergy and 923 comparators) and 1688 developed C difficile (442 participants with penicillin allergy and 1246

2018 BMJ

13. Impact of a clinical guideline for prescribing antibiotics to inpatients reporting penicillin or cephalosporin allergy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Impact of a clinical guideline for prescribing antibiotics to inpatients reporting penicillin or cephalosporin allergy. Self-reported penicillin allergy infrequently reflects an inability to tolerate penicillins. Inpatients reporting penicillin allergy receive alternative antibiotics that might be broader spectrum, more toxic, or less effective.To develop and assess a clinical guideline for the general inpatient provider that directs taking a history and prescribing antibiotics for patients (...) with penicillin or cephalosporin allergy.A guideline was implemented to assist providers with assessing allergy history and prescribing antibiotics for patients with reported penicillin or cephalosporin allergy. The guideline used a standard 2-step graded challenge or test dose. A quasi-experimental study was performed to assess safety, feasibility, and impact on antibiotic use by comparing treatment 21 months before guideline implementation with 12 months after guideline implementation.Significantly more

2015 Asthma & Immunology

14. Penicillin V four times daily for five days versus three times daily for 10 days in patients with pharyngotonsillitis caused by group A streptococci: randomised controlled, open label, non-inferiority study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Penicillin V four times daily for five days versus three times daily for 10 days in patients with pharyngotonsillitis caused by group A streptococci: randomised controlled, open label, non-inferiority study. To determine whether total exposure to penicillin V can be reduced while maintaining adequate clinical efficacy when treating pharyngotonsillitis caused by group A streptococci.Open label, randomised controlled non-inferiority study.17 primary healthcare centres in Sweden between September (...) 2015 and February 2018.Patients aged 6 years and over with pharyngotonsillitis caused by group A streptococci and three or four Centor criteria (fever ≥38.5°C, tender lymph nodes, coatings of the tonsils, and absence of cough).Penicillin V 800 mg four times daily for five days (total 16 g) compared with the current recommended dose of 1000 mg three times daily for 10 days (total 30 g).Primary outcome was clinical cure five to seven days after the end of antibiotic treatment. The non-inferiority

2019 BMJ

15. 'Warning: allergic to penicillin': association between penicillin allergy status in 2.3 million NHS general practice electronic health records, antibiotic prescribing and health outcomes. (Abstract)

'Warning: allergic to penicillin': association between penicillin allergy status in 2.3 million NHS general practice electronic health records, antibiotic prescribing and health outcomes. The prevalence of reported penicillin allergy (PenA) and the impact these records have on health outcomes in the UK general population are unknown. Without such data, justifying and planning enhanced allergy services is challenging.To determine: (i) prevalence of PenA records; (ii) patient characteristics (...) , mortality, MRSA infection/colonization and Clostridioides difficile infection.PenA prevalence was 5.9% (IQR = 3.8%-8.2%). PenA records were more common in older people, females and those with a comorbidity, and were affected by GP practice. Antibiotic prescribing varied significantly: penicillins were prescribed less frequently in those with a PenA record [relative risk (RR)  = 0.15], and macrolides (RR = 4.03), tetracyclines (RR = 1.91) nitrofurantoin (RR = 1.09), trimethoprim (RR = 1.04

2019 Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

16. What dose of penicillin V is recommended for acute tonsillitis and for how long?

What dose of penicillin V is recommended for acute tonsillitis and for how long? What dose of penicillin V is recommended for acute tonsillitis and for how long? - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing (...) including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news. For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com What dose of penicillin V is recommended for acute tonsillitis and for how long? The NLH answered this question in May 2006 (1), as this information appears to be current we have reproduced their answer below. “The clinical

2007 TRIP Answers

17. In patients with a previous splenectomy who have annual pneumococcal vaccinations, what is the risk of pneumococcal illness if they take penicillin once daily or not at all?

In patients with a previous splenectomy who have annual pneumococcal vaccinations, what is the risk of pneumococcal illness if they take penicillin once daily or not at all? In patients with a previous splenectomy who have annual pneumococcal vaccinations, what is the risk of pneumococcal illness if they take penicillin once daily or not at all? - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Turning Research Into Practice ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words (...) annual pneumococcal vaccinations, what is the risk of pneumococcal illness if they take penicillin once daily or not at all? This question appears to be in two parts. Firstly, what is the effectiveness of the pneumococcal vaccine in patients with asplenia. Secondly, in those patients where the pneumoccal vaccine is ineffective, how effective are antibiotics. For both questions there appears to be a lack of data. The material we did find, highlighted below, might serve as some background information

2006 TRIP Answers

18. Direct oral amoxicillin challenge without preliminary skin testing in adult patients with allergy and at low risk with reported penicillin allergy. (Abstract)

Direct oral amoxicillin challenge without preliminary skin testing in adult patients with allergy and at low risk with reported penicillin allergy. Introduction: Ten percent of hospitalized patients report penicillin allergy; however, recent studies indicate that ∼98% of these patients are not acutely hypersensitive. Unconfirmed penicillin allergy poses public health risks, and an evaluation of penicillin allergy labels is recommended to improve antibiotic stewardship. Although the most widely (...) accepted protocol is penicillin skin testing, followed by oral amoxicillin challenge, time constraints and resources may preclude this. Recent literature supports the safety and efficacy of direct oral amoxicillin challenge in individuals at low risk. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated direct oral challenge acceptance and outcomes in eligible adult outpatients with allergy and with a penicillin allergy label over a 6-month period. Direct oral amoxicillin challenge was recommended in patients

2019 Allergy and Asthma Proceedings

19. Treatment of Acute Osteomyelitis with Penicillin: Joint Discussion No. 1 Full Text available with Trip Pro

Treatment of Acute Osteomyelitis with Penicillin: Joint Discussion No. 1 19993312 2010 06 24 2010 06 24 0035-9157 39 7 1946 May Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine Proc. R. Soc. Med. Treatment of Acute Osteomyelitis with Penicillin: Joint Discussion No. 1. 371-82 eng Journal Article England Proc R Soc Med 7505890 0035-9157 2009 12 9 6 0 1946 5 1 0 0 1946 5 1 0 1 ppublish 19993312 PMC2181743

1946 Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine

20. Effect on pain intensity of injection sites and speed of injection associated with intramuscular penicillin. (Abstract)

Effect on pain intensity of injection sites and speed of injection associated with intramuscular penicillin. The aim of this one-group, quasi-experimental study was to examine the effect of choice of injection site and injection duration on the intensity of pain associated with intramuscular penicillin injection. Injections containing the same dose of drug were administered 12 hours apart for each patient over 5 s/mL and 10 s/mL durations in the dorsogluteal and ventrogluteal sites. Sixty (...) patients who had a medical order for intramuscular penicillin at least twice in a day and for two successive days at the same dose were included in the study. No difference in pain was perceived by participants between the two injection durations at either the dorsogluteal or the ventrogluteal site. This study showed that intramuscular penicillin can be administered to either site over 5 s/mL or 10 s/mL durations. There is a need for further research with a randomized controlled design in different

2014 International journal of nursing practice