Latest & greatest articles for penicillin

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Top results for penicillin

1. Penicillin

Penicillin Top results for penicillin - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Turning Research Into Practice ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2 (...) ) and (#3 or #4) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for penicillin The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

2. The impact of dosing frequency on the efficacy of 10-day penicillin or amoxicillin therapy for streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis: a meta-analysis

The impact of dosing frequency on the efficacy of 10-day penicillin or amoxicillin therapy for streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis: a meta-analysis The impact of dosing frequency on the efficacy of 10-day penicillin or amoxicillin therapy for streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis: a meta-analysis The impact of dosing frequency on the efficacy of 10-day penicillin or amoxicillin therapy for streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis: a meta-analysis Lan A J, Colford J M Authors' objectives To compare cure (...) rates between once- or twice-daily (s.i.d. and b.i.d., respectively) and more frequent dosing schedules in the treatment of streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis. Searching MEDLINE and Dissertation Abstracts were searched to August 1998. For MEDLINE, the keywords were 'tonsillopharyngitis', 'pharyngitis', 'penicillin', 'amoxicillin' and 'clinical trials. For Dissertation Abstracts, combinations of the following words were used: 'streptococcus' or 'streptococcal' and 'penicillin' or 'amoxicillin

2000 DARE.

3. Evaluation and Management of Penicillin Allergy: A Review. (Abstract)

Evaluation and Management of Penicillin Allergy: A Review. β-Lactam antibiotics are among the safest and most effective antibiotics. Many patients report allergies to these drugs that limit their use, resulting in the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics that increase the risk for antimicrobial resistance and adverse events.Approximately 10% of the US population has reported allergies to the β-lactam agent penicillin, with higher rates reported by older and hospitalized patients. Although many (...) patients report that they are allergic to penicillin, clinically significant IgE-mediated or T lymphocyte-mediated penicillin hypersensitivity is uncommon (<5%). Currently, the rate of IgE-mediated penicillin allergies is decreasing, potentially due to a decreased use of parenteral penicillins, and because severe anaphylactic reactions to oral amoxicillin are rare. IgE-mediated penicillin allergy wanes over time, with 80% of patients becoming tolerant after a decade. Cross-reactivity between penicillin

2019 JAMA

4. Development and Validation of a Penicillin Allergy Clinical Decision Rule

Development and Validation of a Penicillin Allergy Clinical Decision Rule Development and Validation of a Penicillin Allergy Clinical Decision Rule - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Welcome to the new PubMed. For legacy PubMed go to . Clipboard, Search History, and several other advanced features are temporarily unavailable. National Institutes of Health U.S. National Library of Medicine National Center (...) . 2020 Mar 16;e200403. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.0403. Online ahead of print. Development and Validation of a Penicillin Allergy Clinical Decision Rule , , , , , , , , , , Affiliations Expand Affiliations 1 Centre for Antibiotic Allergy and Research, Department of Infectious Diseases, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Australia. 2 Department of Medicine, Austin Health, University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, Australia. 3 Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Department of Infectious Diseases and The National

2020 EvidenceUpdates

5. Are Short-Term Late-Generation Antibiotics Equivalent to Standard Penicillin Therapy in the Resolution of Symptoms in Acute Strep Throat in Children?

Are Short-Term Late-Generation Antibiotics Equivalent to Standard Penicillin Therapy in the Resolution of Symptoms in Acute Strep Throat in Children? Systematic Review Snapshot TAKE-HOME MESSAGE Although antibiotics are not the best agent for symptomatic management of streptococcal pharyngitis, according to limited data, short-course antibiotics appear to reduce the duration of symptoms more effectively than longer-course therapy. Are Short-Term Late-Generation Antibiotics Equivalent (...) to Standard Penicillin Therapy in the Resolution of Symptoms in Acute Strep Throat in Children? EBEM Commentators Anand Swaminathan, MD, MPH New York University School of Medicine/Bellevue Hospital Center Department of Emergency Medicine New York, NY Jeffrey Hom, MD, MPH Stony Brook University School of Medicine Departments of Pediatrics (Emergency) and Emergency Medicine Stony Brook, NY Results Table 1. Short (3 days) versus standard (7 days) antibiotic course. Symptom Number of Subjects Difference

2013 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

6. The Effect of Non-penicillin Antibiotic Regimens on Neonatal Outcomes in Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes. Full Text available with Trip Pro

The Effect of Non-penicillin Antibiotic Regimens on Neonatal Outcomes in Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes. Objective  A 7-day course of a penicillin (PCN) and macrolide is standard of care (SAR) in preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). Data regarding alternative antibiotic regimens are limited. We sought to assess the impact of non-PCN regimens on neonatal outcomes. Study Design  Secondary analysis of randomized controlled trial of antenatal magnesium sulfate. Singleton

2019 AJP Reports Controlled trial quality: predicted high

7. ASCIA Penicillin Allergy Guide for health professionals

ASCIA Penicillin Allergy Guide for health professionals • In severe penicillin allergy (e.g. anaphylaxis, bronchospasm, urticaria, angioedema), avoid ALL penicillins, cephalosporins and other beta-lactam antibiotics • In non-severe penicillin allergy (e.g. mild rash) use cephalosporins and carbapenems with caution • Some reactions (e.g. nausea) are not considered allergies and do not warrant prohibiting penicillin use Contraindicated At all times where reasonable evidence of penicillin allergy (...) exists Caution Avoid if severe penicillin allergy (e.g. anaphylaxis) Use with caution if non-severe allergy (e.g. minor rash) Seek specialist advice Considered Safe In the absence of other contraindications Cefaclor Cefepime Cefotaxime Cefoxitin Ceftazidime Ceftriaxone Cefuroxime Cephalexin Cephazolin Doripenem, ertapenem, imipenem, meropenem Aztreonam Azithromycin, erythromycin, roxithromycin, clarithromycin Ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, moxifloxacin Clindamycin, lincomycin Doxycycline, minocycline

2016 Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy

8. Anaphylactic Cross-Reactivity Between Penicillin and Cephalosporin

Anaphylactic Cross-Reactivity Between Penicillin and Cephalosporin UTCAT848, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Minimal Risk Of Severe Type 1 Hypersensitivity Reaction To Third Generation Cephalosporin In Patients Who Experience Type 1 Hypersensitivity Reaction And Allergy To Penicillin Clinical Question Do patients who experience a severe type 1 hypersensitivity reaction to penicillin and demonstrate (...) an allergy to cephalosporin experience a severe type 1 hypersensitivity reaction to the cephalosporin? Clinical Bottom Line It appears that patients who have a severe type 1 hypersensitivity reaction to penicillin do not have an increased risk of anaphylaxis to cephalosporins. This evidence may be skewed however by adherence to the recommendation not to give cephalosporins to individuals with a history of penicillin anaphylaxis. (See Comments on the CAT below) Best Evidence (you may view more info

2011 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

9. Penicillin Allergy Is Not Necessarily Forever Full Text available with Trip Pro

Penicillin Allergy Is Not Necessarily Forever 28672303 2017 08 22 2018 11 13 1538-3598 318 1 2017 Jul 04 JAMA JAMA Penicillin Allergy Is Not Necessarily Forever. 82-83 10.1001/jama.2017.6510 Trubiano Jason A JA Department of Infectious Diseases, Austin Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia2Department of Infectious Diseases, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Adkinson N Franklin NF John Hopkins Asthma and Allergy Centre, Baltimore, Maryland. Phillips Elizabeth Jane (...) EJ Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee5Institute for Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Murdoch University, Western Australia, Australia. eng P50 GM115305 GM NIGMS NIH HHS United States Journal Article United States JAMA 7501160 0098-7484 0 Penicillins 37341-29-0 Immunoglobulin E AIM IM JAMA. 2017 Nov 7;318(17 ):1714 29114824 Diagnosis, Differential Drug Hypersensitivity diagnosis immunology Exanthema chemically induced Humans Immunoglobulin E

2017 JAMA

10. Can pneumonia caused by penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae be treated with penicillin?

Can pneumonia caused by penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae be treated with penicillin? BestBets: Can pneumonia caused by penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae be treated with penicillin? Can pneumonia caused by penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae be treated with penicillin? Report By: V Clifford and M Tebruegge (joint first authors), M Vandeleur and Professor Nigel Curtis - Research Fellows Institution: Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of General Medicine (...) /Paediatrics, University of Melbourne; Murdoch Children's Research Institute. Australia. Date Submitted: 22nd January 2010 Date Completed: 11th February 2010 Last Modified: 12th February 2010 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [ child with pneumonia due to penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae] does [treatment with penicillin alone] result in [higher morbidity or mortality]? Clinical Scenario You are looking after a previously healthy 3-year-old girl, who was admitted

2010 BestBETS

11. Penicillin V four times daily for five days versus three times daily for 10 days in patients with pharyngotonsillitis caused by group A streptococci: randomised controlled, open label, non-inferiority study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Penicillin V four times daily for five days versus three times daily for 10 days in patients with pharyngotonsillitis caused by group A streptococci: randomised controlled, open label, non-inferiority study. To determine whether total exposure to penicillin V can be reduced while maintaining adequate clinical efficacy when treating pharyngotonsillitis caused by group A streptococci.Open label, randomised controlled non-inferiority study.17 primary healthcare centres in Sweden between September (...) 2015 and February 2018.Patients aged 6 years and over with pharyngotonsillitis caused by group A streptococci and three or four Centor criteria (fever ≥38.5°C, tender lymph nodes, coatings of the tonsils, and absence of cough).Penicillin V 800 mg four times daily for five days (total 16 g) compared with the current recommended dose of 1000 mg three times daily for 10 days (total 30 g).Primary outcome was clinical cure five to seven days after the end of antibiotic treatment. The non-inferiority

2019 BMJ

12. 'Warning: allergic to penicillin': association between penicillin allergy status in 2.3 million NHS general practice electronic health records, antibiotic prescribing and health outcomes. Full Text available with Trip Pro

'Warning: allergic to penicillin': association between penicillin allergy status in 2.3 million NHS general practice electronic health records, antibiotic prescribing and health outcomes. The prevalence of reported penicillin allergy (PenA) and the impact these records have on health outcomes in the UK general population are unknown. Without such data, justifying and planning enhanced allergy services is challenging.To determine: (i) prevalence of PenA records; (ii) patient characteristics (...) , mortality, MRSA infection/colonization and Clostridioides difficile infection.PenA prevalence was 5.9% (IQR = 3.8%-8.2%). PenA records were more common in older people, females and those with a comorbidity, and were affected by GP practice. Antibiotic prescribing varied significantly: penicillins were prescribed less frequently in those with a PenA record [relative risk (RR)  = 0.15], and macrolides (RR = 4.03), tetracyclines (RR = 1.91) nitrofurantoin (RR = 1.09), trimethoprim (RR = 1.04

2019 Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

13. Estimating Benzathine Penicillin Need for the Treatment of Pregnant Women Diagnosed with Syphilis during Antenatal Care in High-Morbidity Countries Full Text available with Trip Pro

Estimating Benzathine Penicillin Need for the Treatment of Pregnant Women Diagnosed with Syphilis during Antenatal Care in High-Morbidity Countries Congenital syphilis continues to be a preventable cause of global stillbirth and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Shortages of injectable penicillin, the only recommended treatment for pregnant women and infants with syphilis, have been reported by high-morbidity countries. We sought to estimate current and projected annual needs for benzathine (...) penicillin in antenatal care settings for 30 high morbidity countries that account for approximately 33% of the global burden of congenital syphilis.Proportions of antenatal care attendance, syphilis screening coverage in pregnancy, syphilis prevalence among pregnant women, and adverse pregnancy outcomes due to untreated maternal syphilis reported to WHO were applied to 2012 birth estimates for 30 high syphilis burden countries to estimate current and projected benzathine penicillin need for prevention

2016 PloS one

14. Five-Day Spiramycin vs Seven-Day Penicillin V in the Treatment of Streptococcal Tonsillitis in Children. (Abstract)

Five-Day Spiramycin vs Seven-Day Penicillin V in the Treatment of Streptococcal Tonsillitis in Children. Because of the frequency of penicillin allergies in children receiving β-lactam antibacterial agents, the macrolides are frequently chosen as alternatives in patients with group A β-haemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) infections. Spiramycin, amacrolide widely used in paediatrics, achieving remarkably high tonsillar tissue concentrations, was evaluated in this study in comparison with penicillin (...) V (Phenoxymethylpenicillin). 298 children aged 1.5 to 14 years with acute tonsillitis and a positive rapid antigen test for GABHS were randomised to receive either a 5-day course of spiramycin 100 000 IU/kg twice daily or a 7-day course of penicillin V 25 000 IU/kg 3 times daily. Clinical and bacteriological assessments were recorded at inclusion (day 1), at the end of the treatment visit (days 8 to 12), and at the follow-up visit (days 25 to 35). GABHS isolated during the study were analysed

2016 Clinical drug investigation Controlled trial quality: uncertain

15. Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis

Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Investing (...) boards Evidence Education * Associated Topics Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis Shukan Kanuga, DDS, MSD . Overview Systematic Review Conclusion Three to 6 days of short-term late-generation antibiotics have comparable treatment efficacy as a 10-day course of oral penicillin in children with acute group A β-hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS) pharyngitis. Critical Summary Assessment On the basis of good

2015 ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

16. Diagnostic accuracy of penicillin skin testing at predicting IgE-mediated reaction to aminopenicillins and natural penicillins in patients with a history of penicillin allergy

Diagnostic accuracy of penicillin skin testing at predicting IgE-mediated reaction to aminopenicillins and natural penicillins in patients with a history of penicillin allergy Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability

2019 PROSPERO

17. Benzylpenicillin (Penicillin g)

Benzylpenicillin (Penicillin g) Benzylpenicillin (Penicillin G) BPN Drugs October 2006 Page 1 of 2 Drugs PRESENTATION Ampoule containing 600 milligrams of benzylpenicillin as powder. ACTIONS Antibiotic active against a range of bacteria. DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Administer en-route to hospital (unless already administered by GP etc). Administer by slow IV injection. If it is not possible to gain rapid vascular access, the drug should be given by the IM route, as detailed below, into the antero (...) . May be no rash • pain in joints, muscles and limbs • seizures • level of consciousness: • early in shock – alert/able to speak • as shock advances – babies become limp, ?oppy and drowsy; older children/adults may develop dif?culty in walking/standing, drowsy, confused. Meningococcal septicaemia is commonest in young children and young adults. It may progress rapidly and the sooner benzylpenicillin is administered the better the outcome. CONTRA-INDICATIONS Genuine penicillin allergy. AGE DOSE

2006 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

18. Cefuroxime, levofloxacin, esomeprazole, and bismuth as first-line therapy for eradicating Helicobacter pylori in patients allergic to penicillin. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cefuroxime, levofloxacin, esomeprazole, and bismuth as first-line therapy for eradicating Helicobacter pylori in patients allergic to penicillin. Eradicating Helicobacter pylori infection is clinically challenging, notably in cases with penicillin allergy. Cephalosporin could be used in lieu of amoxicillin to eradicate Helicobacter pylori. The current work aimed to assess therapeutic efficacy and safety of a cefuroxime-based quadruple regimen in treatment-naïve individuals with penicillin (...) allergy, as well as patient compliance.In the present prospective single-center cohort study, 152 Helicobacter pylori infected individuals with penicillin allergy received eradication therapy with cefuroxime (500 mg twice/day), levofloxacin (500 mg once/day), esomeprazole (20 mg twice/day) and bismuth potassium citrate (220 mg twice/day; 14 days). Safety and compliance were evaluated 1 to 3 days upon eradication. The urea breath test was carried out 8 to 12 weeks upon eradication for efficacy

2019 BMC Gastroenterology

19. What dose of penicillin V is recommended for acute tonsillitis and for how long?

What dose of penicillin V is recommended for acute tonsillitis and for how long? What dose of penicillin V is recommended for acute tonsillitis and for how long? - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing (...) including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news. For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com What dose of penicillin V is recommended for acute tonsillitis and for how long? The NLH answered this question in May 2006 (1), as this information appears to be current we have reproduced their answer below. “The clinical

2007 TRIP Answers

20. Efficacy of high doses of penicillin versus amoxicillin in the treatment of uncomplicated community acquired pneumonia in adults. A non-inferiority controlled clinical trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Efficacy of high doses of penicillin versus amoxicillin in the treatment of uncomplicated community acquired pneumonia in adults. A non-inferiority controlled clinical trial. Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is treated with penicillin in some northern European countries.To evaluate whether high-dose penicillin V is as effective as high-dose amoxicillin for the treatment of non-severe CAP.Multicentre, parallel, double-blind, controlled, randomized clinical trial.31 primary care centers (...) in Spain.Patients from 18 to 75 years of age with no significant associated comorbidity and with symptoms of lower respiratory tract infection and radiological confirmation of CAP were randomized to receive either penicillin V 1.6 million units, or amoxicillin 1000mg three times per day for 10 days.The main outcome was clinical cure at 14 days, and the primary hypothesis was that penicillin V would be non-inferior to amoxicillin with regard to this outcome, with a margin of 15% for the difference in proportions

2019 Atencion Primaria Controlled trial quality: predicted high