Latest & greatest articles for palliative care

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on palliative care and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Top results for palliative care

141. A good death at home: home palliative care services keep people where they want to be

A good death at home: home palliative care services keep people where they want to be A good death at home: home palliative care services keep people where they want to be | Evidently Cochrane sharing the latest Cochrane Reviews Search Main menu Post navigation by Key message: There is good evidence that home palliative care increases the chance of dying at home and reduces symptom burden, especially for people with cancer, without increasing caregiver grief. Where would you prefer to die (...) , if you had an advanced illness? More than 50% of people say they would like to die at home, given the choice, but in many countries relatively few people do; just 21% in England in 2010, for example. The need for home palliative care services is increasing as the ageing population expands and an understanding of their impact on death at home and on things that matter to patients and their carers, such as how well symptoms are controlled and how they feel about their care, is important in working out

2013 Evidently Cochrane

142. Do community specialist palliative care services that provide home nursing increase rates of home death for people with life-limiting illnesses? A systematic review and meta-analysis of comparative studies

Do community specialist palliative care services that provide home nursing increase rates of home death for people with life-limiting illnesses? A systematic review and meta-analysis of comparative studies Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2013 DARE.

143. Levomepromazine for nausea and vomiting in palliative care. (Abstract)

Levomepromazine for nausea and vomiting in palliative care. Nausea and vomiting are common, distressing symptoms for patients receiving palliative care. There are several agents which can be used to treat these symptoms. Levomepromazine is an antipsychotic drug which is commonly used to alleviate nausea and vomiting in palliative care settings.To evaluate the efficacy of and adverse events (both minor and serious) associated with the use of levomepromazine for the treatment of nausea (...) and vomiting in palliative care patients.We searched the electronic databases including CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE using relevant search terms and synonyms in March 2013.Randomised controlled trials of levomepromazine for the treatment of nausea or vomiting, or both, for adults receiving palliative care. Studies where symptoms were thought to be due to pregnancy or surgery were excluded.The potential relevance of studies was assessed based on titles and abstracts. Any study reports which appeared to meet

2013 Cochrane

144. Generalist plus Specialist Palliative Care - Creating a More Sustainable Model. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Generalist plus Specialist Palliative Care - Creating a More Sustainable Model. 23465068 2013 04 04 2018 12 02 1533-4406 368 13 2013 Mar 28 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Generalist plus specialist palliative care--creating a more sustainable model. 1173-5 10.1056/NEJMp1215620 Quill Timothy E TE Department of Medicine, Palliative Care Division, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA. Abernethy Amy P AP eng Journal Article 2013 03 06 United States N Engl (...) J Med 0255562 0028-4793 AIM IM J Clin Anesth. 2014 Sep;26(6):429-31 25200705 Curriculum Fellowships and Scholarships Humans Palliative Care standards Specialization Specialty Boards United States Workforce 2013 3 8 6 0 2013 3 8 6 0 2013 4 5 6 0 ppublish 23465068 10.1056/NEJMp1215620

2013 NEJM

145. Midhurst Macmillan Community Specialist Palliative Care Service

Midhurst Macmillan Community Specialist Palliative Care Service Midhurst Macmillan Community Specialist Palliative Care Service | The King's Fund Main navigation Health and care services Leadership, systems and organisations Patients, people and society Policy, finance and performance Search term Apply Midhurst Macmillan Community Specialist Palliative Care Service: Delivering end-of-life care in the community This content relates to the following topics: Share this content Related details (...) Authors Publication details Pages 34 This case study looks at the Midhurst Macmillan Service – a community-based, consultant-led, specialist palliative care service in a rural community in the south of England. The service covers approximately 150,000 people across three counties – Surrey, Hampshire and West Sussex. It is jointly funded by the NHS and Macmillan Cancer Support up to a total value of £1.2 million per year. This case study is part of a in the United States to compare five successful UK

2013 The King's Fund

146. Palliative Care

Palliative Care Guidelines | ICSI The MN Health Collaborative includes physicians and other representatives from major healthcare organizations working together to address major health topics affecting Minnesota communities today. ICSI has been developing evidence-based clinical practice guidelines to improve patient care since 1993. ICSI helps forward-focused Minnesota health organizations find ways to redefine and redesign systems and the market. Together, we aim to improve care and reduce (...) patients at risk for osteoporosis, as well as identification and treatment of those patients with osteoporosis. August 28, 2017 "/> Assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of acute, subacute, and chronic pain in ambulatory settings. November 21, 2013 "/> This guideline will assist primary and specialty care providers in identifying and caring for adult patients with a serious (potentially life-limiting, life-threatening or chronic, progressive) illness who may benefit from palliative care. April 1, 2014

2013 Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement

147. Methylnaltrexone for treating opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in people with advanced illness receiving palliative care (terminated appraisal) (TA277)

Methylnaltrexone for treating opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in people with advanced illness receiving palliative care (terminated appraisal) (TA277) Overview | Methylnaltrexone for treating opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in people with advanced illness receiving palliative care (terminated appraisal) | Guidance | NICE Methylnaltrexone for treating opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in people with advanced illness receiving palliative care (terminated appraisal) Technology appraisal [TA277 (...) ] Published date: 27 March 2013 Share Guidance NICE is unable to recommend the use in the NHS of methylnaltrexone for treating opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in people with advanced illness receiving palliative care because no evidence submission was received from the manufacturer of the technology. Explore © NICE [year]. All rights reserved. Subject to .

2013 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Technology Appraisals

148. Pediatric palliative care in Canada and the United States: a qualitative metasummary of the needs of patients and families

Pediatric palliative care in Canada and the United States: a qualitative metasummary of the needs of patients and families Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2013 DARE.

149. Naloxone for use in long-term care and palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines

Naloxone for use in long-term care and palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines Naloxone for use in long-term care and palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines Naloxone for use in long-term care and palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines CADTH Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made (...) for the HTA database. Citation CADTH. Naloxone for use in long-term care and palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). Rapid Response - Reference List. 2013 Authors' conclusions One evidence-based guideline was identified for the use of naloxone to reverse the effects of narcotics in long-term care and palliative care patients. No evidence was identified regarding the clinical effectiveness and safety of naloxone

2013 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

150. Transitions to palliative care for older people in acute hospitals: a mixed-methods study

Transitions to palliative care for older people in acute hospitals: a mixed-methods study Transitions to palliative care for older people in acute hospitals: a mixed-methods study Transitions to palliative care for older people in acute hospitals: a mixed-methods study Gott M, Ingleton C, Gardiner C, Richards N, Cobb M, Ryan A, Noble B, Bennett M, Seymour J, Ward S, Parker C Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA (...) . No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Gott M, Ingleton C, Gardiner C, Richards N, Cobb M, Ryan A, Noble B, Bennett M, Seymour J, Ward S, Parker C. Transitions to palliative care for older people in acute hospitals: a mixed-methods study. Health Services and Delivery Research 2013; 1(11) Authors' objectives (1) to explore how transitions to a palliative care approach are managed and experienced in acute hospitals and to identify best practice from

2013 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

151. Closing the quality gap: revisiting the state of the science series - Improving health care and palliative care for advanced and serious illness

Closing the quality gap: revisiting the state of the science series - Improving health care and palliative care for advanced and serious illness Closing the quality gap: revisiting the state of the science series - Improving health care and palliative care for advanced and serious illness Closing the quality gap: revisiting the state of the science series - Improving health care and palliative care for advanced and serious illness Dy SM, Aslakson R, Wilson RF, Fawole OA, Lau BD, Martinez KA (...) , Vollenweider D, Apostol C, Bass EB Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Dy SM, Aslakson R, Wilson RF, Fawole OA, Lau BD, Martinez KA, Vollenweider D, Apostol C, Bass EB. Closing the quality gap: revisiting the state of the science series - Improving health care and palliative care for advanced and serious illness. Rockville: Agency

2012 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

152. Drug therapy for symptoms associated with anxiety in adult palliative care patients. (Abstract)

Drug therapy for symptoms associated with anxiety in adult palliative care patients. This is an update of the review published on 'Drug therapy for anxiety in adult palliative care patients' in Issue 1, 2004 of The Cochrane Library. Anxiety is common in palliative care patients. It can be a natural response to impending death, but it may represent a clinically significant issue in its own right. It may also result from pain, or other untreated or poorly managed symptoms. When anxiety is severe (...) or distressing drug therapy may be considered in addition to supportive care.This review aimed to identify and evaluate randomised controlled trials examining the effectiveness of drug therapy for symptoms of anxiety in adult palliative care patients.We searched the following sources: CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to 2012), EMBASE (1980 to 2012), CINAHL (1982 to 2012), PsycLit (1974 to 2000) and PsycInfo (1990 to 2012) for literature pertaining to this topic published in any

2012 Cochrane

153. Interventions to support a palliative care approach in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: An integrative review (Abstract)

Interventions to support a palliative care approach in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: An integrative review End-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a debilitating, life-limiting condition. A palliative approach is appropriate for individuals with end-stage COPD, yet currently few interventions embrace this holistic, multidisciplinary and inclusive perspective.To describe interventions to support a palliative care approach in patients with end-stage (...) COPD.Integrative review. DATA SOURCES AND REVIEW METHOD: Peer reviewed articles meeting the search criteria were accessed from Medline, PsychINFO, CINAHL and Google Scholar databases as well as Caresearch online resource. The domains of quality palliative care developed by Steinhauser were used as the conceptual framework to synthesise information.This review has shown that a range of palliative interventions are used to address the needs of individuals with end-stage COPD. Although evidence exists

2012 EvidenceUpdates

154. Antidepressants for the treatment of depression in palliative care: systematic review and meta-analysis

Antidepressants for the treatment of depression in palliative care: systematic review and meta-analysis Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2012 DARE.

155. Palliative care. (Abstract)

Palliative care. 22312158 2012 07 03 2013 06 25 1539-3704 156 3 2012 Feb 07 Annals of internal medicine Ann. Intern. Med. In the clinic. Palliative care. ITC2-1, TC2-2, TC2-3, TC2-4, TC2-5, TC2-6, TC2-7, TC2-8, TC2-9, TC2-10, TC2-11, TC2-12, TC2-13, TC2-14, TC2-15; quiz TC2-16 10.7326/0003-4819-156-3-201202070-01002 Swetz Keith M KM Kamal Arif H AH eng Journal Article Review United States Ann Intern Med 0372351 0003-4819 AIM IM Communication Ethics, Clinical Hospice Care ethics psychology (...) Humans Palliative Care ethics psychology standards Patient Care Team Patient Education as Topic Physician-Patient Relations Terminal Care ethics psychology United States 2012 2 8 6 0 2012 2 9 6 0 2012 7 4 6 0 ppublish 22312158 156/3/ITC2-1 10.7326/0003-4819-156-3-201202070-01002

2012 Annals of Internal Medicine

156. Palliative care for adults: strong opioids for pain relief

Palliative care for adults: strong opioids for pain relief P Palliativ alliative care for adults: strong opioids e care for adults: strong opioids for pain relief for pain relief Clinical guideline Published: 23 May 2012 nice.org.uk/guidance/cg140 © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE, arrived at after (...) be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with complying with those duties. Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Palliative care for adults: strong opioids for pain relief (CG140) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 2

2012 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

157. Cohort study: Modelling study of prognostic indicators for patients with locally advanced or metastatic cancer identifies variables that predict short-term survival in palliative care

Cohort study: Modelling study of prognostic indicators for patients with locally advanced or metastatic cancer identifies variables that predict short-term survival in palliative care Modelling study of prognostic indicators for patients with locally advanced or metastatic cancer identifies variables that predict short-term survival in palliative care | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie (...) for patients with locally advanced or metastatic cancer identifies variables that predict short-term survival in palliative care Article Text Prognosis Cohort study Modelling study of prognostic indicators for patients with locally advanced or metastatic cancer identifies variables that predict short-term survival in palliative care David Casarett Statistics from Altmetric.com Commentary on: Gwilliam B , Keeley V , Todd C , et al . Development of prognosis in palliative care study (PiPS) predictor models

2012 Evidence-Based Medicine

158. Improving health care and palliative care for advanced and serious illness: closing the quality gap - revisiting the state of the science

Improving health care and palliative care for advanced and serious illness: closing the quality gap - revisiting the state of the science Improving health care and palliative care for advanced and serious illness: closing the quality gap - revisiting the state of the science Improving health care and palliative care for advanced and serious illness: closing the quality gap - revisiting the state of the science Dy SM, Aslakson R, Wilson RF, Fawole OA, Lau BD, Martinez KA, Vollenweider D, Apostol (...) the effectiveness of health care and palliative care interventions and quality improvement models to improve outcomes for patients with advanced and serious illness. Searching MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library and DARE were searched from 2000 to 2011. Additional studies were sought from reference lists of eligible articles and relevant reviews, as well as from technical experts. Study selection Studies that evaluated health care and palliative care interventions, including quality improvement

2012 DARE.

160. Development of Prognosis in Palliative care Study (PiPS) predictor models to improve prognostication in advanced cancer: prospective cohort study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Development of Prognosis in Palliative care Study (PiPS) predictor models to improve prognostication in advanced cancer: prospective cohort study. To develop a novel prognostic indicator for use in patients with advanced cancer that is significantly better than clinicians' estimates of survival.Prospective multicentre observational cohort study.18 palliative care services in the UK (including hospices, hospital support teams, and community teams).1018 patients with locally advanced (...) or metastatic cancer, no longer being treated for cancer, and recently referred to palliative care services.Performance of a composite model to predict whether patients were likely to survive for "days" (0-13 days), "weeks" (14-55 days), or "months+" (>55 days), compared with actual survival and clinicians' predictions.On multivariate analysis, 11 core variables (pulse rate, general health status, mental test score, performance status, presence of anorexia, presence of any site of metastatic disease

2011 BMJ