Latest & greatest articles for palliative care

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Top results for palliative care

81. Implementing patient-reported outcome measures in palliative care clinical practice: a systematic review of facilitators and barriers

Implementing patient-reported outcome measures in palliative care clinical practice: a systematic review of facilitators and barriers Implementing patient-reported outcome measures in palliative care clinical practice: a systematic review of facilitators and barriers Implementing patient-reported outcome measures in palliative care clinical practice: a systematic review of facilitators and barriers Antunes B, Harding R, Higginson IJ, EUROIMPACT CRD summary This review identified (...) the facilitators and barriers to the implementation of patient-reported outcome measures in different palliative care settings. The authors made recommendations for managers, health professionals, and patients for three stages of implementation. Their conclusions reflect the evidence presented, but potential limitations from publication bias and study quality should be borne in mind. Authors' objectives To identify the facilitators and barriers to the implementation of patient-reported outcome measures

DARE.2014

82. Fentanyl transdermal patches in palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines

Fentanyl transdermal patches in palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines Fentanyl transdermal patches in palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines Fentanyl transdermal patches in palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines CADTH Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database (...) . Citation CADTH. Fentanyl transdermal patches in palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). Rapid Response - Summary of Abstracts. 2014 Authors' conclusions Two evidence-based guidelines regarding the use of fentanyl transdermal patches for pain relief in palliative care patients were identified. Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Administration, Cutaneous; Fentanyls

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2014

83. Impact of community based, specialist palliative care teams on hospitalisations and emergency department visits late in life and hospital deaths: a pooled analysis.

Impact of community based, specialist palliative care teams on hospitalisations and emergency department visits late in life and hospital deaths: a pooled analysis. OBJECTIVE: To determine the pooled effect of exposure to one of 11 specialist palliative care teams providing services in patients' homes. DESIGN: Pooled analysis of a retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Ontario, Canada. PARTICIPANTS: 3109 patients who received care from specialist palliative care teams in 2009-11 (exposed) matched (...) by propensity score to 3109 patients who received usual care (unexposed). INTERVENTION: The palliative care teams studied served different geographies and varied in team composition and size but had the same core team members and role: a core group of palliative care physicians, nurses, and family physicians who provide integrated palliative care to patients in their homes. The teams' role was to manage symptoms, provide education and care, coordinate services, and be available without interruption

BMJ2014 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

84. Medically assisted nutrition for adult palliative care patients.

Medically assisted nutrition for adult palliative care patients. BACKGROUND: Many palliative care patients have a reduced oral intake during their illness. The management of this can include the provision of medically assisted nutrition with the aim of prolonging the length of life of a patient, improving their quality of life, or both. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 4, 2008. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of medically assisted nutrition (...) on the quality and length of life of palliative care patients. SEARCH METHODS: We identified studies from searching Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CANCERLIT, Caresearch, Dissertation abstracts, SCIENCE CITATION INDEX and the reference lists of all eligible trials, key textbooks and previous systematic reviews. The date of the latest search was 26 March 2014. SELECTION CRITERIA: All relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or prospective controlled

Cochrane2014

85. Benefits and costs of home palliative care compared with usual care for patients with advanced illness and their family caregivers.

Benefits and costs of home palliative care compared with usual care for patients with advanced illness and their family caregivers. CLINICAL QUESTION: Are home palliative care services associated with benefits to patients with advanced illness and family caregivers, and are they cost-effective? BOTTOM LINE: Compared with usual care, home palliative care is associated with increased odds of dying at home and fewer symptoms for patients with advanced illness. It is not associated with changes (...) in caregiver grief. Cost-effectiveness is inconclusive.

JAMA2014

86. Early palliative care for patients with advanced cancer: a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

Early palliative care for patients with advanced cancer: a cluster-randomised controlled trial. BACKGROUND: Patients with advanced cancer have reduced quality of life, which tends to worsen towards the end of life. We assessed the effect of early palliative care in patients with advanced cancer on several aspects of quality of life. METHODS: The study took place at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre (Toronto, ON, Canada), between Dec 1, 2006, and Feb 28, 2011. 24 medical oncology clinics were (...) cluster randomised (in a 1:1 ratio, using a computer-generated sequence, stratified by clinic size and tumour site [four lung, eight gastrointestinal, four genitourinary, six breast, two gynaecological]), to consultation and follow-up (at least monthly) by a palliative care team or to standard cancer care. Complete masking of interventions was not possible; however, patients provided written informed consent to participate in their own study group, without being informed of the existence of another

Lancet2014

87. Palliative care consultation items

Palliative care consultation items Palliative care consultation items Palliative care consultation items Medical Services Advisory Committee Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Medical Services Advisory Committee. Palliative care consultation items. Canberra: Medical Services Advisory Committee (MSAC). MSAC application 1159. 2014 Authors' conclusions (...) After considering the strength of the available evidence in relation to the safety, clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of palliative care medicine consultation items MSAC considered that there was a lack of evidence to support the claim and that the nature of the application itself was outside MSAC's normal frame for consideration. MSAC, however, noted that there may be some benefit in the introduction of new complex assessment and treatment items for palliative medicine specialists and

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2014

88. Systematic review and meta-analysis: Home palliative care services increase the chance of adults with advanced illness dying at home and reduce symptom burden without impact on caregiver grief

Systematic review and meta-analysis: Home palliative care services increase the chance of adults with advanced illness dying at home and reduce symptom burden without impact on caregiver grief Home palliative care services increase the chance of adults with advanced illness dying at home and reduce symptom burden without impact on caregiver grief | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username (...) and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Home palliative care services increase the chance of adults with advanced illness dying at home and reduce symptom burden without impact on caregiver grief Article

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2014

90. Qualitative study: Early ambulatory palliative care visits focus on psychosocial elements such as building rapport and coping, as well as managing symptoms and enhancing illness understanding

Qualitative study: Early ambulatory palliative care visits focus on psychosocial elements such as building rapport and coping, as well as managing symptoms and enhancing illness understanding Early ambulatory palliative care visits focus on psychosocial elements such as building rapport and coping, as well as managing symptoms and enhancing illness understanding | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using (...) your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Early ambulatory palliative care visits focus on psychosocial elements such as building rapport and coping, as well as managing symptoms

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2014

91. Fentanyl transdermal patches in palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines

Fentanyl transdermal patches in palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines Fentanyl transdermal patches in palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines Fentanyl transdermal patches in palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines CADTH Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database (...) . Citation CADTH. Fentanyl transdermal patches in palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). Rapid Response. 2014 Authors' conclusions Two evidence-based guidelines regarding the use of fentanyl transdermal patches for pain relief in palliative care patients were identified. Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Administration, Cutaneous; Fentanyls; Palliative Care

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2014

93. Analgesia: use of patient/proxy patient controlled analgesia in palliative care

Analgesia: use of patient/proxy patient controlled analgesia in palliative care Analgesia: use of patient/proxy patient controlled analgesia in palliative care | Great Ormond Street Hospital Navigation Search Search You are here Analgesia: use of patient/proxy patient controlled analgesia in palliative care Analgesia: use of patient/proxy patient controlled analgesia in palliative care ; . These techniques are most commonly used following surgery ( ; ), but can also be effective (...) professionals, rather than being trained to take on the responsibility for administration of bolus doses of analgesia. Although this is entirely appropriate in a patient population who are opiate naïve and with limited pain experience, such as the majority of post-operative patients. The palliative care population who will be considered for PCA and PPCA have different characteristics. In this population, patients and parents/carers are experienced in both pain assessment and management of pain, utilising

Great Ormond Street Hospital2014

94. Early specialty palliative care - translating data in oncology into practice.

Early specialty palliative care - translating data in oncology into practice. Early specialty palliative care--translating data in oncology into practice. - PubMed - NCBI Warning: The NCBI web site requires JavaScript to function. Search database Search term Search Result Filters Format Summary Summary (text) Abstract Abstract (text) MEDLINE XML PMID List Apply Choose Destination File Clipboard Collections E-mail Order My Bibliography Citation manager Format Create File 1 selected item (...) : 24328469 Format MeSH and Other Data E-mail Subject Additional text E-mail Add to Clipboard Add to Collections Order articles Add to My Bibliography Generate a file for use with external citation management software. Create File 2013 Dec 12;369(24):2347-51. doi: 10.1056/NEJMsb1305469. Early specialty palliative care--translating data in oncology into practice. 1 , , , . 1 From Harvard Medical School (R.B.P.) and Massachusetts General Hospital (J.S.T.) - both in Boston; the American Cancer Society

NEJM2013 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

95. The role of healthcare support workers in providing palliative and end-of-life care in the community: a systematic literature review

The role of healthcare support workers in providing palliative and end-of-life care in the community: a systematic literature review The role of healthcare support workers in providing palliative and end-of-life care in the community: a systematic literature review The role of healthcare support workers in providing palliative and end-of-life care in the community: a systematic literature review Herber OR, Johnston BM CRD summary The authors explored the role, challenges and supporting factors (...) in delivering community end-of-life care by healthcare support workers. The concluded that training programmes, a defined period of preceptorship, appropriate support, supervision and clearly defined role boundaries may be helpful to success. Under reporting of the data extraction and synthesis processes may diminish the reliability of these conclusions. Authors' objectives To explore the role, associated challenges, and supporting factors regarding the delivery of end-of-life care in the community

DARE.2013

96. A good death at home: home palliative care services keep people where they want to be

A good death at home: home palliative care services keep people where they want to be A good death at home: home palliative care services keep people where they want to be | Evidently Cochrane sharing the latest Cochrane Reviews Search Main menu Post navigation by Key message: There is good evidence that home palliative care increases the chance of dying at home and reduces symptom burden, especially for people with cancer, without increasing caregiver grief. Where would you prefer to die (...) , if you had an advanced illness? More than 50% of people say they would like to die at home, given the choice, but in many countries relatively few people do; just 21% in England in 2010, for example. The need for home palliative care services is increasing as the ageing population expands and an understanding of their impact on death at home and on things that matter to patients and their carers, such as how well symptoms are controlled and how they feel about their care, is important in working out

Evidently Cochrane2013

97. Do community specialist palliative care services that provide home nursing increase rates of home death for people with life-limiting illnesses? A systematic review and meta-analysis of comparative studies

Do community specialist palliative care services that provide home nursing increase rates of home death for people with life-limiting illnesses? A systematic review and meta-analysis of comparative studies Do community specialist palliative care services that provide home nursing increase rates of home death for people with life-limiting illnesses? A systematic review and meta-analysis of comparative studies Do community specialist palliative care services that provide home nursing increase (...) rates of home death for people with life-limiting illnesses? A systematic review and meta-analysis of comparative studies Luckett T, Davidson PM, Lam L, Phillips J, Currow DC, Agar M CRD summary The review concluded that evidence that palliative home nursing for patients with life-limiting illnesses increased the rate of death at home without compromising symptoms, quality of life or increasing costs was inconclusive. These conclusions were suitably cautious in reflecting the limited evidence

DARE.2013

98. Levomepromazine for nausea and vomiting in palliative care.

Levomepromazine for nausea and vomiting in palliative care. BACKGROUND: Nausea and vomiting are common, distressing symptoms for patients receiving palliative care. There are several agents which can be used to treat these symptoms. Levomepromazine is an antipsychotic drug which is commonly used to alleviate nausea and vomiting in palliative care settings. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of and adverse events (both minor and serious) associated with the use of levomepromazine (...) for the treatment of nausea and vomiting in palliative care patients. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the electronic databases including CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE using relevant search terms and synonyms in March 2013. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials of levomepromazine for the treatment of nausea or vomiting, or both, for adults receiving palliative care. Studies where symptoms were thought to be due to pregnancy or surgery were excluded. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The potential relevance

Cochrane2013

99. Generalist plus Specialist Palliative Care - Creating a More Sustainable Model.

Generalist plus Specialist Palliative Care - Creating a More Sustainable Model. Generalist plus specialist palliative care--creating a more sustainable model. - PubMed - NCBI Warning: The NCBI web site requires JavaScript to function. Search database Search term Search Result Filters Format Summary Summary (text) Abstract Abstract (text) MEDLINE XML PMID List Apply Choose Destination File Clipboard Collections E-mail Order My Bibliography Citation manager Format Create File 1 selected item (...) : 23465068 Format MeSH and Other Data E-mail Subject Additional text E-mail Add to Clipboard Add to Collections Order articles Add to My Bibliography Generate a file for use with external citation management software. Create File 2013 Mar 28;368(13):1173-5. doi: 10.1056/NEJMp1215620. Epub 2013 Mar 6. Generalist plus specialist palliative care--creating a more sustainable model. 1 , . 1 Department of Medicine, Palliative Care Division, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA. Comment

NEJM2013

100. Methylnaltrexone for treating opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in people with advanced illness receiving palliative care (terminated appraisal) (TA277)

Methylnaltrexone for treating opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in people with advanced illness receiving palliative care (terminated appraisal) (TA277) Methylnaltrexone for treating opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in people with advanced illness receiving palliative care (terminated appraisal) | Guidance and guidelines | NICE Methylnaltrexone for treating opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in people with advanced illness receiving palliative care (terminated appraisal) Technology appraisal (...) guidance [TA277] Published date: 27 March 2013 Share Guidance Explore Guidance app Copyright © 2017 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.

National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Technology Appraisals2013