Latest & greatest articles for palliative care

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on palliative care and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Top results for palliative care

61. Integration of Palliative Care Into Standard Oncology Care

Integration of Palliative Care Into Standard Oncology Care ');//--> ');//--> Search in: Menu COOKIES REQUIRED In order to access this website, please configure your browser to support cookies. 2318 Mill Road, Suite 800, Alexandria, VA 22314 © 2018 American Society of Clinical Oncology | |

American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines2016

62. Quantitative study?other: Costs incurred by family caregivers of patients with palliative care needs

Quantitative study?other: Costs incurred by family caregivers of patients with palliative care needs Costs incurred by family caregivers of patients with palliative care needs | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword (...) Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Costs incurred by family caregivers of patients with palliative care needs Article Text Nursing issues Quantitative study—other Costs incurred by family caregivers of patients with palliative care needs Ronda G Hughes Statistics from Altmetric.com No Altmetric data available for this article. Commentary on : Gott M , Allen R

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2016

63. Routine Bowel Care for Patients in Long-Term or Palliative Care: Guidelines

Routine Bowel Care for Patients in Long-Term or Palliative Care: Guidelines Routine Bowel Care for Patients in Long-Term or Palliative Care: Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Routine Bowel Care for Patients in Long-Term or Palliative Care: Guidelines Routine Bowel Care for Patients in Long-Term or Palliative Care: Guidelines Published on: December 7, 2015 Project Number: RB0940-000 Product Line: Research Type: Devices and Systems Report Type: Summary of Abstracts Result type (...) : Report Question What are the guidelines for routine bowel care of long-term care seniors and palliative care residents? Key Message Two evidence-based guidelines were identified regarding routine bowel care of long-term care seniors and palliative care residents. Tags constipation, defecation, diarrhea, duodenal obstruction, fecal impaction, fecal incontinence, geriatrics, long-term care, nursing homes, palliative care, palliative Files Rapid Response Summary of Abstracts Published : December 7, 2015

Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review2015

65. Palliative Care.

Palliative Care. Palliative Care. - PubMed - NCBI Warning: The NCBI web site requires JavaScript to function. Search database Search term Search Result Filters Format Summary Summary (text) Abstract Abstract (text) MEDLINE XML PMID List Apply Choose Destination File Clipboard Collections E-mail Order My Bibliography Citation manager Format Create File 1 selected item: 26605939 Format MeSH and Other Data E-mail Subject Additional text E-mail Add to Clipboard Add to Collections Order articles Add (...) to My Bibliography Generate a file for use with external citation management software. Create File 2015 Nov 26;373(22):2188. doi: 10.1056/NEJMc1511946#SA1. Palliative Care. , , . Comment on [N Engl J Med. 2015] PMID: 26605939 DOI: [Indexed for MEDLINE] Publication types MeSH terms Full Text Sources Medical PubMed Commons 0 comments How to cite this comment: Supplemental Content Full text links You are here: > > PubMed Simple NCBI Directory Getting Started Resources Popular Featured NCBI Information

NEJM2015 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

66. Palliative Care.

Palliative Care. Palliative Care. - PubMed - NCBI Warning: The NCBI web site requires JavaScript to function. Search database Search term Search Result Filters Format Summary Summary (text) Abstract Abstract (text) MEDLINE XML PMID List Apply Choose Destination File Clipboard Collections E-mail Order My Bibliography Citation manager Format Create File 1 selected item: 26605940 Format MeSH and Other Data E-mail Subject Additional text E-mail Add to Clipboard Add to Collections Order articles Add (...) to My Bibliography Generate a file for use with external citation management software. Create File 2015 Nov 26;373(22):2188-9. doi: 10.1056/NEJMc1511946#SA2. Palliative Care. , , . Comment on [N Engl J Med. 2015] PMID: 26605940 DOI: [Indexed for MEDLINE] Publication types MeSH terms Full Text Sources Medical PubMed Commons 0 comments How to cite this comment: Supplemental Content Full text links You are here: > > PubMed Simple NCBI Directory Getting Started Resources Popular Featured NCBI

NEJM2015 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

67. Haloperidol for the treatment of nausea and vomiting in palliative care patients.

Haloperidol for the treatment of nausea and vomiting in palliative care patients. BACKGROUND: Nausea and vomiting are common symptoms in patients with terminal, incurable illnesses. Both nausea and vomiting can be distressing. Haloperidol is commonly prescribed to relieve these symptoms. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 2, 2009, of Haloperidol for the treatment of nausea and vomiting in palliative care patients. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy (...) and adverse events associated with the use of haloperidol for the treatment of nausea and vomiting in palliative care patients. SEARCH METHODS: For this updated review, we performed updated searches of CENTRAL, EMBASE and MEDLINE in November 2013 and in November 2014. We searched controlled trials registers in March 2015 to identify any ongoing or unpublished trials. We imposed no language restrictions. For the original review, we performed database searching in August 2007, including CENTRAL, MEDLINE

Cochrane2015

68. Levomepromazine for nausea and vomiting in palliative care.

Levomepromazine for nausea and vomiting in palliative care. BACKGROUND: This is an updated version of the original Cochrane Review published in Issue 4, 2013, on Levomepromazine for nausea and vomiting in palliative care.Nausea and vomiting are common, distressing symptoms for patients receiving palliative care. There are several drugs which can be used to treat these symptoms, known as antiemetics. Levomepromazine is an antipsychotic drug is commonly used as an antiemetic to alleviate nausea (...) and vomiting in palliative care settings. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of, and adverse events associated with, levomepromazine for the treatment of nausea and vomiting in palliative care patients. SEARCH METHODS: For this update we searched electronic databases, including those of Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE, up to February 2015. We searched clinical trial registers on 7 October 2015 for ongoing trials. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled

Cochrane2015

69. Palliative Care for the Seriously Ill.

Palliative Care for the Seriously Ill. Palliative Care for the Seriously Ill. - PubMed - NCBI Warning: The NCBI web site requires JavaScript to function. Search database Search term Search Result Filters Format Summary Summary (text) Abstract Abstract (text) MEDLINE XML PMID List Apply Choose Destination File Clipboard Collections E-mail Order My Bibliography Citation manager Format Create File 1 selected item: 26287850 Format MeSH and Other Data E-mail Subject Additional text E-mail Add (...) to Clipboard Add to Collections Order articles Add to My Bibliography Generate a file for use with external citation management software. Create File 2015 Aug 20;373(8):747-55. doi: 10.1056/NEJMra1404684. Palliative Care for the Seriously Ill. , . Comment in [N Engl J Med. 2015] [N Engl J Med. 2015] PMID: 26287850 PMCID: DOI: [Indexed for MEDLINE] Images from this publication. Figure 1 Symptom Prevalence in Advanced Illness Data are from representative studies of symptom prevalence among patients

NEJM2015

70. Training and supportive programs for palliative care volunteers in community settings.

Training and supportive programs for palliative care volunteers in community settings. BACKGROUND: Palliative care is specialised health care to support people living with a terminal illness and their families. The involvement of volunteers can extend the range of activities offered by palliative care services, particularly for those living in the community. Activities undertaken by palliative care volunteers vary considerably but can be practical, social or emotional in nature. The types (...) of training and support provided to these volunteers are likely to affect the volunteers' effectiveness in their role and influence the quality of care provided to palliative care clients and their families. Training and support can also have considerable resource implications for palliative care organisations, which makes it important to know how to provide this training and support as effectively as possible. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of training and support strategies for palliative care

Cochrane2015

71. [Information brief concerning palliative care day centres]

[Information brief concerning palliative care day centres] Avis sur les centres de jour en soins palliatifs [Information brief concerning palliative care day centres] Avis sur les centres de jour en soins palliatifs [Information brief concerning palliative care day centres] Auclair Y, Hernandez Hurtado E, Fournier M Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made (...) for the HTA database. Citation Auclair Y, Hernandez Hurtado E, Fournier M. Avis sur les centres de jour en soins palliatifs. [Information brief concerning palliative care day centres] Quebec: Institut national d'excellence en sante et en services sociaux (INESSS). ETMIS 2015; 11(2). 2015 Authors' conclusions Although some evidence suggests that attending a PCDC may be beneficial for patients, the data do not enable determination of: (1) the contribution of PCDCs to management of symptoms or to improvement

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2015

72. Palliative care for patients with advanced fibrotic lung disease: a randomised controlled phase II and feasibility trial of a community case conference intervention

Palliative care for patients with advanced fibrotic lung disease: a randomised controlled phase II and feasibility trial of a community case conference intervention 26103995 2015 08 14 2015 11 05 2015 08 14 1468-3296 70 9 2015 Sep Thorax Thorax Palliative care for patients with advanced fibrotic lung disease: a randomised controlled phase II and feasibility trial of a community case conference intervention. 830-9 10.1136/thoraxjnl-2014-206583 Those affected by advanced fibrotic interstitial (...) lung diseases (ILDs) have considerable unmet symptom and psychological needs. Case conferencing has been proposed to address these issues, but requires evaluation. To obtain preliminary information on the impact of a case conference intervention delivered in the home (Hospital2Home) on palliative care concerns of patients and their carers, and to evaluate feasibility and acceptability. Hospital2Home was trialled at a specialist centre using a Phase II fast-track randomised controlled trial

EvidenceUpdates2015

73. Laxatives for the management of constipation in people receiving palliative care.

Laxatives for the management of constipation in people receiving palliative care. BACKGROUND: This article describes the second update of a Cochrane review on the effectiveness of laxatives for the management of constipation in people receiving palliative care. Previous versions were published in 2006 and 2010 where we also evaluated trials of methylnaltrexone; these trials have been removed as they are included in another review in press. In these earlier versions, we drew no conclusions (...) on individual effectiveness of different laxatives because of the limited number of evaluations. This is despite constipation being common in palliative care, generating considerable suffering due to the unpleasant physical symptoms and the availability of a wide range of laxatives with known differences in effect in other populations. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness and differential efficacy of laxatives used to manage constipation in people receiving palliative care. SEARCH METHODS: We searched

Cochrane2015

74. Dignity-conserving care in palliative care settings: An integrative review

Dignity-conserving care in palliative care settings: An integrative review 25706903 2015 06 24 2016 02 01 2015 06 24 1365-2702 24 13-14 2015 Jul Journal of clinical nursing J Clin Nurs Dignity-conserving care in palliative care settings: An integrative review. 1743-72 10.1111/jocn.12791 To report an integrative review of evidence relating to dignity-conserving care in palliative care settings. It will also suggest avenues for future research. Research suggests that dignity is welcomed by those (...) receiving palliative and end of life care. However, as dignity is a subjective term, it is not always explicit how this may be employed by nurses. Given that the preferred place of care for patients with palliative care needs is the home, the issue of dignity may be particularly important for community nurses. Therefore, synthesising evidence of dignity-conserving care for community nurses caring for people with palliative care needs provides clarity in a complex area of palliative care research

EvidenceUpdates2015

75. Quantitative study?other: An online learning module improves specialist palliative care nurses? pain assessments and patient-reported pain

Quantitative study?other: An online learning module improves specialist palliative care nurses? pain assessments and patient-reported pain An online learning module improves specialist palliative care nurses’ pain assessments and patient-reported pain | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password (...) * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here An online learning module improves specialist palliative care nurses’ pain assessments and patient-reported pain Article Text Nursing issues Quantitative study—other An online learning module improves specialist palliative care nurses’ pain assessments

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2015

76. Systematic review: Non-cancer palliative care in the community needs greater interprofessional collaboration to maintain coordinated care and manage uncertainty

Systematic review: Non-cancer palliative care in the community needs greater interprofessional collaboration to maintain coordinated care and manage uncertainty Non-cancer palliative care in the community needs greater interprofessional collaboration to maintain coordinated care and manage uncertainty | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers (...) of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Non-cancer palliative care in the community needs greater interprofessional collaboration to maintain coordinated care and manage uncertainty Article Text Adult nursing Systematic review Non-cancer palliative care in

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2015

77. Silent night: retrospective database study assessing possibility of "weekend effect" in palliative care.

Silent night: retrospective database study assessing possibility of "weekend effect" in palliative care. OBJECTIVE: To compare the mortality of patients in a palliative care unit on working days with that on weekends and public holidays. DESIGN: Retrospective database study. SETTING: Palliative care unit in Germany. POPULATION: All admissions to palliative care unit between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2008. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The impact of day type (working days or weekends and public (...) holidays) on mortality was analysed using Poisson regression models. RESULTS: A total of 2565 admitted patients and 1325 deaths were recorded. Of the deaths, 448 (33.8%) occurred on weekends and public holidays. The mortality rate on weekends and public holidays was 18% higher than that on working days (mortality rate ratio 1.18, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.32; P=0.005). CONCLUSION: Patients in the palliative care unit were at higher risk of dying on weekends and public holidays. In the absence

BMJ2014 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

78. Droperidol for treatment of nausea and vomiting in palliative care patients.

Droperidol for treatment of nausea and vomiting in palliative care patients. BACKGROUND: This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 10, 2010, on droperidol for the treatment of nausea and vomiting in palliative care patients. Nausea and vomiting are common symptoms in patients with terminal illness and can be very unpleasant and distressing. There are several different types of antiemetic treatments that can be used to control these symptoms. Droperidol (...) is an antipsychotic drug and has been used and studied as an antiemetic in the management of postoperative and chemotherapy nausea and vomiting. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy and adverse events (both minor and serious) associated with the use of droperidol for the treatment of nausea and vomiting in palliative care patients. SEARCH METHODS: We searched electronic databases including CENTRAL, MEDLINE (1950-), EMBASE (1980-), CINAHL (1981-) and AMED (1985-), using relevant search terms and synonyms

Cochrane2014

79. Putting the Heart into Palliative Care

Putting the Heart into Palliative Care Putting the Heart into Palliative Care - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By October 10, 2014 // In the last of our special series of guest blogs for Hospice Care Week, GP Richard Lehman considers palliative care for people with heart failure and the need for good care based on the patient’s goals at the end of life, whatever their mode of dying. Stewart S, MacIntyre K, Hole DJ, Capewell S, McMurray JJ More “malignant” than cancer? Five-year survival (...) following a first admission with heart failure. Eur J Heart Fail 2001;3:315-22 Looking through the Palliative Care section of the , you will find a great wealth of reviews, from the very general to the very specific. Almost all of them relate to dying from cancer. Most people, however, die from conditions other than cancer; and conversely most people with cancer do not die from it. The average age of patients in acute medical hospital wards is now 80 or over, and the commonest cause for admission

Evidently Cochrane2014

80. Implementing patient-reported outcome measures in palliative care clinical practice: a systematic review of facilitators and barriers

Implementing patient-reported outcome measures in palliative care clinical practice: a systematic review of facilitators and barriers Implementing patient-reported outcome measures in palliative care clinical practice: a systematic review of facilitators and barriers Implementing patient-reported outcome measures in palliative care clinical practice: a systematic review of facilitators and barriers Antunes B, Harding R, Higginson IJ, EUROIMPACT CRD summary This review identified (...) the facilitators and barriers to the implementation of patient-reported outcome measures in different palliative care settings. The authors made recommendations for managers, health professionals, and patients for three stages of implementation. Their conclusions reflect the evidence presented, but potential limitations from publication bias and study quality should be borne in mind. Authors' objectives To identify the facilitators and barriers to the implementation of patient-reported outcome measures

DARE.2014