Latest & greatest articles for palliative care

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Top results for palliative care

41. Effects of Early Integrated Palliative Care in Patients With Lung and GI Cancer: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Effects of Early Integrated Palliative Care in Patients With Lung and GI Cancer: A Randomized Clinical Trial 28029308 2016 12 28 2017 04 03 1527-7755 35 8 2017 Mar 10 Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology J. Clin. Oncol. Effects of Early Integrated Palliative Care in Patients With Lung and GI Cancer: A Randomized Clinical Trial. 834-841 10.1200/JCO.2016.70.5046 Purpose We evaluated the impact of early integrated palliative care (PC) in (...) in quality of life (QOL) from baseline to week 12, per scoring by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General scale. Secondary end points included change in QOL from baseline to week 24, change in depression per the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and differences in end-of-life communication. Results Intervention patients ( v usual care) reported greater improvement in QOL from baseline to week 24 (1.59 v -3.40; P = .010) but not week 12 (0.39 v -1.13; P = .339). Intervention patients also

EvidenceUpdates2017

42. Palliative care in sub-Saharan Africa.

Palliative care in sub-Saharan Africa. Control of pain and symptoms and terminal care are necessary for quality HIV and cancer care in sub-Saharan Africa. However, what constitutes feasible, accessible, and effective palliative care, and how to develop such services, remains to be resolved. Africa-specific palliative care includes components that carry resource implications. Home and community-based care has been largely successful, but community capacity and the resources and clinical (...) supervision necessary to sustain quality care are lacking. Coverage and referrals must be primary concerns. Simple lay and professional protocols have been developed, but opioid availability remains a major constraint. Areas of good practice, and areas where further success may be achieved include: attention to community needs and capacity; explicit frameworks for service development and palliative-care integration throughout the disease course (including antiretroviral provision); further education

Lancet2017

43. Systematic review with meta-analysis: Palliative care improves quality of life and reduces symptom burden in adults with life-limiting illness

Systematic review with meta-analysis: Palliative care improves quality of life and reduces symptom burden in adults with life-limiting illness Palliative care improves quality of life and reduces symptom burden in adults with life-limiting illness | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your (...) user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Palliative care improves quality of life and reduces symptom burden in adults with life-limiting illness Article Text Adult nursing Systematic review with meta-analysis Palliative care improves quality of life and reduces symptom burden in adults with life

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2017

44. Randomised controlled trial: Placebo might be superior to antipsychotics in management of delirium in the palliative care setting

Randomised controlled trial: Placebo might be superior to antipsychotics in management of delirium in the palliative care setting Placebo might be superior to antipsychotics in management of delirium in the palliative care setting | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username (...) and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Placebo might be superior to antipsychotics in management of delirium in the palliative care setting Article Text Therapeutics/Prevention Randomised controlled trial

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2017

45. Palliative Care

Palliative Care ACS TQIP PALLIATIVE CARE BEST PRACTICES GUIDELINES Table of Contents Introduction 3 Interdisciplinary Palliative Care Team 5 Essential Components of Palliative Care 6 Breaking Bad News 9 Palliative Care Assessment 12 Goals of Care Conversation 19 End-of-Life Care 21 Special Considerations for Geriatric Patients 23 Special Considerations for Pediatric Patients 25 Special Considerations for Spinal Cord Injury 26 Special Considerations for Traumatic Brain Injury 27 Supporting (...) the Health Care Team 28 Clinical Documentation 30 Performance Improvement Initiatives 32 Implementation Guidelines 34 Glossary of Terms Relevant to Palliative Care 36 Acronyms 37 Appendices 38 2INTRODUCTION Key Messages z Best practice palliative care is delivered in parallel with life-sustaining trauma care, throughout the continuum from injury through recovery. z The unit of care is the patient and family. z Core trauma palliative care can and should be provided by trauma center teams even

American College of Surgeons2017

49. Advance care planning and palliative care

Advance care planning and palliative care Advance care planning and palliative care | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers (...) of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Advance care planning and palliative care Article Text This article has a correction. Please see: EBN perspective Advance care planning and palliative care Roberta Heale 1 , Helen Noble 2 Statistics from Altmetric.com EBN Perspectives brings together key issues from the commentaries in one of our nursing topic themes . This article is part of Evidence Based Nursing (EBN) Perspectives . In this series, commentaries from

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2017

50. Cohort study: Pain-related palliative care challenges in people with advanced dementia call for education and practice development in all care settings

Cohort study: Pain-related palliative care challenges in people with advanced dementia call for education and practice development in all care settings Pain-related palliative care challenges in people with advanced dementia call for education and practice development in all care settings | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use (...) cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Pain-related palliative care challenges in people with advanced dementia call for education and practice

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2017

51. Palliative Care in the Outpatient Setting

Palliative Care in the Outpatient Setting ©Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, 2016 Palliative Care in the Outpatient Setting A Comparative Effectiveness Report Final Report April 27, 2016 Completed by: Institute for Clinical and Economic Review ©Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, 2016 Page i AUTHORS: Courtney Cunningham, MPH Program Director Karin Travers, DSc Research Director Rick Chapman, PhD, MS Director of Health Economics Anne Loos, MA Research Associate Erin Lawler, MA (...) Program and Communications Associate Shanshan Liu, MS, MPH Research Associate Steven D. Pearson, MD, MSc President Daniel A. Ollendorf, PhD Chief Scientific Officer DATE OF PUBLICATION: April 27, 2016 ICER would like to thank Rebecca Kirch, JD, Consultant to the Center to Advance Palliative Care for her peer review of the draft report. ©Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, 2016 Page ii About ICER The Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER) is an independent non-profit research

California Technology Assessment Forum2017

53. Palliative care - secretions

Palliative care - secretions Palliative care - secretions - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Palliative care - secretions: Summary During the terminal phase of a person's illness, airway secretions may accumulate and result in gurgling and rattling noises during inspiration and expiration. It may be difficult to tell whether noisy secretions in the last few hours of life are causing distress to the person, but such noises may be distressing to some families or carers. Listen (...) to the concerns and fears of relatives and friends. Ease their distress by explaining that the semiconscious/unconscious person will generally not be distressed by the rattle. Secretions at the end of life may be due to: Salivary and bronchial secretions Chest infection Aspiration Gastric reflux Pulmonary oedema Bronchorrhoea (the production of 100 mL or more per day of watery mucus) When managing a person with noisy respiratory secretions at the end of life: It is essential to recognize the signs of dying

NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries2017

54. Palliative care - oral

Palliative care - oral Palliative care - oral - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Palliative care - oral: Summary Common oral problems in palliative care include dry mouth, painful mouth, halitosis, alteration of taste, and excessive salivation. They may result from poor oral intake, drug treatments, local irradiation, oral tumours, or chemotherapy. Oral symptoms may significantly affect the person's quality of life, causing eating, drinking, and communication problems, and oral (...) discomfort and pain. When assessing a person with oral symptoms in palliative care: Ask about dry mouth, oral pain, halitosis, alteration in taste, excessive salivation, bad breath, difficulty chewing, difficulty speaking, dysphagia, and bleeding. Examine the oral cavity for signs of dehydration, level of oral hygiene, ulceration and vesicles, erythema or white patches, local tumour, bleeding, and infection. The cause of most oral problems can be diagnosed on the basis of clinical features alone

NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries2017

55. Palliative care - nausea and vomiting

Palliative care - nausea and vomiting Palliative care - nausea and vomiting - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Summary Nausea is an unpleasant sensation of the need to vomit, which is often accompanied by autonomic symptoms (for example pallor, cold sweat, salivation, and tachycardia). Vomiting (emesis) is the forceful ejection of stomach contents through the mouth. There are many causes of nausea and vomiting in the palliative care setting (...) the stage of the person’s illness, their prognosis, the severity of their symptoms, and the wishes of the person and their family. Simple measures may help relieve nausea and vomiting in palliative care. They include: Ensuring access to a large bowl, tissues, and water. Eating snacks consisting of a few mouthfuls rather than large meals. Drinking cool fizzy drinks rather than still or hot drinks. Relaxation techniques. Parenteral hydration, if appropriate. Cognitive behavioural therapy (for anticipatory

NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries2017

56. Palliative care - malignant skin ulcer

Palliative care - malignant skin ulcer Palliative care - malignant skin ulcer - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Palliative care - malignant skin ulcer: Summary A malignant ulcer is a proliferative or cavitating primary or secondary cancer in the skin. It may appear as a crater-like wound, a nodular 'fungus', or a 'cauliflower' lesion. Most malignant ulcers develop from a breast, head and neck, or skin cancer. Malignant ulcers are most likely to develop in people older than 70 years (...) of life as much as possible. Ensuring a professional with expertise in wound management is involved in the person's care (such as a district nurse, palliative care or tissue viability nurse). This professional can advise on the need for cleansing, debridement, and the correct selection and use of dressings. Referral where appropriate to an oncologist or palliative care specialist for advice if further cancer treatment is possible (such as radiotherapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, or surgical intervention

NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries2017

57. Palliative care - general issues

Palliative care - general issues Palliative care - general issues - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Palliative care - general issues: Summary Palliative care is defined as the active holistic care of people with advanced, progressive illness. Professionals providing general palliative care services should: Be involved as early as possible after diagnosis. Aim to meet the needs of the patient and their family within the limits of their knowledge and competence. Seek specialist advice (...) : Should be based on locally agreed protocols and guidelines, delivered within the context of a managed system or pathway. Requires a multidisciplinary team because of the potential multidimensional nature of problems in palliative care. Have I got the right topic? Age from 16 years onwards This CKS topic covers the general management issues related to palliative care and incorporates guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence on Improving supportive and palliative care for

NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries2017

58. Palliative care - dyspnoea

Palliative care - dyspnoea Palliative care - dyspnoea - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Palliative care - dyspnoea: Summary Breathlessness is an objective observable sign, whereas dyspnoea is a subjective described symptoms of difficulty in breathing. Anxiety is often a major component of dyspnoea. Dyspnoea can result from impaired ventilation or increased ventilatory demand, or both factors. There are multiple possible causes of dyspnoea in people with cancer, including: Direct (...) causes — such as primary lung cancer or lung metastases. Indirect effects of cancer — such as pleural effusion, superior vena cava syndrome, anaemia, pulmonary embolism, and surgery. Non-malignant causes — such as pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, and anxiety. Assessment of someone with dyspnoea in a palliative care setting involves asking about: Features of the dyspnoea (for example severity, timing, onset, and precipitating and exacerbating factors). Associated

NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries2017

59. Palliative care - cough

Palliative care - cough Palliative care - cough - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Palliative care - cough: Summary Cough is a defensive reflex that occurs in response to stimulation of irritant receptors which are found in the airways. It has two functions — to prevent foreign material entering the lower respiratory tract, and to clear secretions from the lungs and airways. Cough in people with cancer is most commonly associated with cancer of the airways, lungs, pleura (...) , and mediastinum, but tumours metastasizing to the thorax can also cause cough. In people with cancer, the most common cause of acute cough is respiratory tract infection. Other possible non-malignant causes include post-nasal drip, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. When assessing someone with cough in palliative care, the following should be elicited: The impact on the person's quality of life. The severity, time of onset, and duration of the cough

NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries2017

60. Palliative care - constipation

Palliative care - constipation Palliative care - constipation - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Palliative care - constipation: Summary Constipation is defecation that is unsatisfactory because of infrequent stools, difficult stool passage, or seemingly incomplete defecation. Stools are often dry and hard, and may be abnormally large or abnormally small. About 80% of people with cancer will require treatment with laxatives at some time. People receiving palliative care have multiple (...) causes of constipation, such as: Drugs, for example, opioid analgesics, antimuscarinic drugs, antacids. Secondary effects of disease, for example, dehydration, inadequate dietary fibre, inactivity, delirium, spinal cord compression, lack of privacy. Direct effects of malignant tumours, causing bowel obstruction, hypercalcaemia, nerve damage. When assessing a person with constipation in palliative care: The history should include information about the frequency and character of stools, discomfort

NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries2017