Latest & greatest articles for palliative care

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on palliative care or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on palliative care and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for palliative care

201. Improving supportive and palliative care for adults with cancer

Improving supportive and palliative care for adults with cancer Guidance on Cancer Services Improving Supportive and Palliative Care for Adults with Cancer The Manual National Institute for Clinical Excellence NHSImproving Supportive and Palliative Care for Adults with Cancer Cancer service guidance supports the implementation of The NHS Cancer Plan for England, 1 and the NHS Plan for Wales Improving Health in Wales. 2 The service guidance programme was initiated in 1995 to follow on from (...) and consultation with stakeholders. The recommendations are based on the research evidence that addresses clinical effectiveness and service delivery. While cost impact has been calculated for the main recommendations, formal cost-effectiveness studies have not been performed.Guidance on Cancer Services Improving Supportive and Palliative Care for Adults with Cancer The Manual Contents Executive summary 3 Introduction A. Aim of this Guidance 15 B. Rationale for developing the Guidance 15 - Burden of cancer 15

National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines2004

202. Overcoming the false dichotomy of curative vs palliative care for late-stage HIV/AIDS: "let me live the way I want to live, until I can't".

Overcoming the false dichotomy of curative vs palliative care for late-stage HIV/AIDS: "let me live the way I want to live, until I can't". Recent advances in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapy have significantly reduced HIV-related mortality in the developed world, but mortality rates have plateaued, and AIDS remains a leading cause of serious illness and death for young adults. The chronic nature of the HIV disease course and the increasing burden of cumulative HIV-related morbidity (...) and treatment-related toxic effects pose new challenges to the care of patients over time. Uncertainties about prognosis and the promise and limitations of rapidly evolving therapies have made decision making about advance care planning and end-of-life issues more complex and elusive than when the disease course was more uniform, rapid, and predictable. The emerging biomedical paradigm of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) as the cornerstone of treatment has helped to transform HIV into a

JAMA2003

203. A good death in Uganda: survey of needs for palliative care for terminally ill people in urban areas.

A good death in Uganda: survey of needs for palliative care for terminally ill people in urban areas. OBJECTIVE: To identify the palliative care needs of terminally ill people in Uganda. DESIGN: Descriptive cross sectional study. SETTING: Home care programmes in and around Kampala that look after terminally ill people in their homes. PARTICIPANTS: 173 terminally ill patients registered with the home care programmes. RESULTS: Most of the participants had either HIV/AIDS or cancer or both; 145 (...) were aged under 50 years, and 107 were women. Three main needs were identified: the control or relief of pain and other symptoms; counselling; and financial assistance for basic needs such as food, shelter, and school fees for their children. The preferred site of care was the home, though all these people lived in urban areas with access to healthcare services within 5 km of their homes. CONCLUSION: A "good death" in a developing country occurs when the dying person is being cared for at home

BMJ2003 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

204. Is there evidence that palliative care teams alter end-of-life experiences of patients and their caregivers?

Is there evidence that palliative care teams alter end-of-life experiences of patients and their caregivers? Is there evidence that palliative care teams alter end-of-life experiences of patients and their caregivers? Is there evidence that palliative care teams alter end-of-life experiences of patients and their caregivers? Higginson I J, Finlay I G, Goodwin D M, Hood K, Edwards A G, Cook A, Douglas H R, Normand C E CRD summary This review evaluated the effectiveness of palliative care and (...) hospice care teams compared with conventional care. The authors found only a small positive effect on patient outcomes. The authors used a quantitative synthesis despite the presence of clinical and statistical heterogeneity, so the results should be interpreted with caution. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of palliative care and hospice care teams (PCHCT). Searching MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cancerlit, PsycINFO, EMBASE, PallCare Index, the Cochrane EPOC Register of trials, SIGLE, ASSIA

DARE.2003

205. Doctors' perceptions of palliative care for heart failure: focus group study.

Doctors' perceptions of palliative care for heart failure: focus group study. OBJECTIVES: To identify doctors' perceptions of the need for palliative care for heart failure and barriers to change. DESIGN: Qualitative study with focus groups. SETTING: North west England. PARTICIPANTS: General practitioners and consultants in cardiology, geriatrics, palliative care, and general medicine. RESULTS: Doctors supported the development of palliative care for patients with heart failure with the general (...) practitioner as a central figure. They were reluctant to endorse expansion of specialist palliative care services. Barriers to developing approaches to palliative care in heart failure related to three main areas: the organisation of health care, the unpredictable course of heart failure, and the doctors' understanding of roles. The health system was thought to work against provision of holistic care, exacerbated by issues of professional rivalry and control. The priorities identified for the future were

BMJ2002 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

206. Dignity-conserving care--a new model for palliative care: helping the patient feel valued.

Dignity-conserving care--a new model for palliative care: helping the patient feel valued. The basic tenets of palliative care may be summarized as the goal of helping patients to die with dignity. The term "dignity" provides an overarching framework that may guide the physician, patient, and family in defining the objectives and therapeutic considerations fundamental to end-of-life care. Dignity-conserving care is care that may conserve or bolster the dignity of dying patients. Using segments (...) of interviews with a patient with advanced lung cancer, his wife, and his palliative care physician, this article illustrates and explores various aspects of dignity-conserving care and the model on which it is based. Dignity-conserving care offers an approach that clinicians can use to explicitly target the maintenance of dignity as a therapeutic objective and as a principle of bedside care for patients nearing death.

JAMA2002

207. Secondary and tertiary palliative care in US hospitals.

Secondary and tertiary palliative care in US hospitals. Palliative care services provide secondary and tertiary levels of palliative care, the interdisciplinary care of patients in which the goal is comfort and quality of life. Primary palliative care refers to the basic skills and competencies required of all physicians and other health care professionals. Secondary palliative care refers to the specialist clinicians and organizations that provide consultation and specialty care. Tertiary (...) palliative care refers to the academic medical centers where specialist knowledge for the most complex cases is practiced, researched, and taught. The case of Reverend J, a man with advanced cancer admitted to an acute palliative care unit in a teaching hospital, illustrates the use of secondary and tertiary clinical palliative care services in hospitals and health care systems.

JAMA2002

208. Do hospital-based palliative teams improve care for patients or families at the end of life?

Do hospital-based palliative teams improve care for patients or families at the end of life? Do hospital-based palliative teams improve care for patients or families at the end of life? Do hospital-based palliative teams improve care for patients or families at the end of life? Higginson I J, Finlay I, Goodwin D M, Cook A M, Hood K, Edwards A G, Douglas H R, Norman C E Authors' objectives To assess the effectiveness of hospital-based palliative care on the process and outcomes of care (...) for patients and families at the end of life. Searching The databases searched were: MEDLINE from 1977 to 1999; CINAHL from 1982 to 1998; Cancerlit from 1983 to 1999; PsycINFO from 1979 to 1999; EMBASE from 1979 to 1999; PallCare Index (1998); and the Cochrane EPOC Register of trials. The keywords were 'palliative', 'hospice', 'terminal care', 'terminally ill', 'dying', 'end-of-life' and associated terms. These were combined with 'effective', 'evaluate', 'random', 'methods', 'economics', 'statistics

DARE.2002

209. Benzodiazepines and related drugs for insomnia in palliative care.

Benzodiazepines and related drugs for insomnia in palliative care. BACKGROUND: Insomnia, a subjective complaint of poor sleep and associated impairment in daytime function, is a common problem. Currently, benzodiazepines are the most used pharmacological treatment for this complaint. They are considered helpful for occasional short-term use up to four weeks but longer term use is not advised due to potential problems regarding tolerance, dosing escalation, psychological addiction and physical (...) dependence. There is no consensus on their utility in patients with progressive incurable conditions who may require assistance with sleep for many weeks as their condition deteriorates. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of benzodiazepines or benzodiazepine receptor agonists such as Zolpidem, Zopiclone and Zaleplon for insomnia in palliative care. SEARCH STRATEGY: Several electronic databases were searched including Cochrane PaPaS Group specialized register, Cochrane Library Issue 4

Cochrane2002

210. Does truth telling improve psychological distress of palliative care patients: a systematic review

Does truth telling improve psychological distress of palliative care patients: a systematic review Does truth telling improve psychological distress of palliative care patients: a systematic review Does truth telling improve psychological distress of palliative care patients: a systematic review Leliopoulo C, Wilkinson S M, Fellowes D Authors' objectives To identify and review studies that measured whether telling the truth has a positive or negative effect on the patients' psychological (...) distress, and to draw conclusions as to whether truth disclosure is beneficial or not in reducing psychological distress in palliative care patients. Searching The following databases were searched: MEDLINE from 1966 to December 2001; EMBASE from 1980 to March 2001; PsycINFO from 1966 to April 2001; CINAHL from 1982 to March 2001; Best Evidence from 1991 to January/February 2001; SIGLE from 1980 to January 2001; and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (Issue 1, 2001). The search terms used

DARE.2001

211. A palliative-care intervention and death at home: a cluster randomised trial.

A palliative-care intervention and death at home: a cluster randomised trial. 11036893 2000 10 18 2000 11 01 2015 11 19 0140-6736 356 9233 2000 Sep 09 Lancet (London, England) Lancet A palliative-care intervention and death at home: a cluster randomised trial. 888-93 The Palliative Medicine Unit at University Hospital of Trondheim, Norway, started an intervention programme that aims to enable patients to spend more time at home and die there if they prefer. Close cooperation was needed (...) . The palliative-care intervention enabled more patients to die at home. More resources for care in the home (palliative care training and staff) and an increased focus on use of nursing homes would be necessary, however, to increase time at home and reduce hospital admissions. Jordhøy M S MS Unit of Applied Clinical Research, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Kreftbygget, University Hospital of Trondheim. mjordhoy@online.no Fayers P P Saltnes T T Ahlner-Elmqvist M M Jannert M M Kaasa S S eng Clinical

Lancet2000

212. Are some palliative care delivery systems more effective and efficient than others: a systematic review of comparative studies

Are some palliative care delivery systems more effective and efficient than others: a systematic review of comparative studies Are some palliative care delivery systems more effective and efficient than others: a systematic review of comparative studies Are some palliative care delivery systems more effective and efficient than others: a systematic review of comparative studies Critchley P, Jadad A R, Taniguchi A, Woods A, Stevens R, Reyno L, Whelan T J Authors' objectives To assess (...) the effectiveness of different models of palliative care delivery systems. Searching The following sources were searched to March 1997: MEDLINE (from 1966), HealthSTAR (from 1975), CINAHL (from 1982), Cancerlit (from 1982), and the Cochrane Library (Issue 2, 1997). Search strategies, which were adapted for all databases, included the terms 'palliat', 'hospice', 'terminally ill', 'end stage disease' and 'delivery of health care'. In addition, the reference lists of available texts and retrieved articles were

DARE.1999

213. The impact of different models of specialist palliative care on patients' quality of life: a systematic literature review

The impact of different models of specialist palliative care on patients' quality of life: a systematic literature review The impact of different models of specialist palliative care on patients' quality of life: a systematic literature review The impact of different models of specialist palliative care on patients' quality of life: a systematic literature review Salisbury C, Bosanquet N, Wilkinson E K, Franks P J, Kite S, Lorentzon M, Naysmith A Authors' objectives To assess the impact (...) of different models of specialist palliative care on the quality of life of patients. Searching Electronic searches were conducted of the following databases in 1997 for articles published since 1978: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Index of Scientific and Technical Proceedings, the Cochrane Library, SIGLE, NHS Project Research System, Health Planning and Administration, Cancerlit and DHSS data. EMBASE, MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library searches were updated to June 1998. Details of the search strategy were given

DARE.1999

214. Patient and carer preference for, and satisfaction with, specialist models of palliative care: a systematic literature review

Patient and carer preference for, and satisfaction with, specialist models of palliative care: a systematic literature review Patient and carer preference for, and satisfaction with, specialist models of palliative care: a systematic literature review Patient and carer preference for, and satisfaction with, specialist models of palliative care: a systematic literature review Wilkinson E K, Salisbury C, Bosanquet N, Franks P J, Kite S, Lorentzon M, Naysmith A Authors' objectives To examine (...) the impact of specialist models of palliative care on consumer satisfaction, opinion and preference. Searching Electronic searches of the following databases were carried out (1978-June 1998): MEDLINE; EMBASE; Index of scientific and technical proceedings; the Cochrane Library; SIGLE (Index of grey literature); NHS Project Research System. Details of the search strategies were provided. The following journals were handsearched (June 1992-June 1996): the Hospice Journal; Palliative Medicine; Journal of

DARE.1999

215. Treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma in Sweden: a health economic comparison of palliative treatment with best supportive care versus palliative treatment with gemcitabine in combination with best supportive care

Treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma in Sweden: a health economic comparison of palliative treatment with best supportive care versus palliative treatment with gemcitabine in combination with best supportive care Treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma in Sweden: a health economic comparison of palliative treatment with best supportive care versus palliative treatment with gemcitabine in combination with best supportive care Treatment of locally advanced pancreatic (...) carcinoma in Sweden: a health economic comparison of palliative treatment with best supportive care versus palliative treatment with gemcitabine in combination with best supportive care Ragnarson-Tennvall G, Wilking N Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.1999

216. Does hospital at home for palliative care facilitate death at home? Randomised controlled trial.

Does hospital at home for palliative care facilitate death at home? Randomised controlled trial. 10582932 2000 01 14 2000 01 14 2014 07 28 0959-8138 319 7223 1999 Dec 04 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Does hospital at home for palliative care facilitate death at home? Randomised controlled trial. 1472-5 To evaluate the impact on place of death of a hospital at home service for palliative care. Pragmatic randomised controlled trial. Former Cambridge health district. 229 patients referred (...) refute this. Problems relating to recruitment, attrition, and the vulnerability of the patient group make randomised controlled trials in palliative care difficult. While these difficulties have to be recognised they are not insurmountable with the appropriate resourcing and setting. Grande G E GE Health Services Research Group, General Practice and Primary Care Research Unit, Department of Community Medicine, University of Cambridge, Institute of Public Health, Cambridge CB2 2SR. gag1001

BMJ1999 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

217. Do specialist palliative care teams improve outcomes for cancer patients: a systematic literature review

Do specialist palliative care teams improve outcomes for cancer patients: a systematic literature review Do specialist palliative care teams improve outcomes for cancer patients: a systematic literature review Do specialist palliative care teams improve outcomes for cancer patients: a systematic literature review Hearn J, Higginson I J Authors' objectives To determine whether there is any evidence that the management of patents with advanced cancer by coordinated or multiprofessional teams (...) , which provide specialist palliative care, improves the quality of care of these patients and their families. Searching The following databases were searched: MEDLINE from 1980 to 1996; PsycINFO from 1984 to 1996; CINAHL from 1982 to 1996; and BIDS, EMBASE, Social SciSearch and IBSS, from 1992 to 1996. The search terms were provided in the paper. Palliative Medicine, Journal of Palliative Care and Progress in Palliative Care were handsearched from their first issues to the end of 1996. Two Internet

DARE.1998

218. Bus rounds for palliative care education in the community

Bus rounds for palliative care education in the community Bus rounds for palliative care education in the community Bus rounds for palliative care education in the community Bruera E, Selmser P, Pereira J, Brenneis C Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study (...) and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Bus rounds for palliative care education. Type of intervention Education of palliative care specialists, family doctors and medical students. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population Physicians and nurse palliative care consultants, family doctors, medical students. Setting Community. The economic study was carried out in Alberta, Canada. Dates to which data relate Effectiveness and resource use data related to the period February 1996

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.1997

219. Evaluation of a palliative care service: problems and pitfalls.

Evaluation of a palliative care service: problems and pitfalls. 7532501 1995 03 30 1995 03 30 2013 09 22 0959-8138 309 6965 1994 Nov 19 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Evaluation of a palliative care service: problems and pitfalls. 1340-2 To evaluate a palliative care home support team based on an inpatient unit. Randomised controlled trial with waiting list. Patients in the study group received the service immediately, those in the control group received it after one month. Main comparison (...) point was at one month. A city of 300,000 people with a publicly funded home care service and about 200 general practitioners, most of whom provide home care. Pain and nausea levels were measured at entry to trial and at one month, as were quality of life for patients and care givers' health. Because of early deaths, problems with recruitment, and a low compliance rate for completion of questionnaires, the required sample size was not attained. In designing evaluations of palliative care services

BMJ1994 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro