Latest & greatest articles for palliative care

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Top results for palliative care

181. In-home palliative care increased patient satisfaction and reduced use and costs of medical services

In-home palliative care increased patient satisfaction and reduced use and costs of medical services In-home palliative care increased patient satisfaction and reduced use and costs of medical servicesCommentary | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password (...) For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here In-home palliative care increased patient satisfaction and reduced use and costs of medical servicesCommentary Article Text Treatment In-home palliative care increased patient

2009 Evidence-Based Nursing

182. Palliative Care for the Older Person

Palliative Care for the Older Person Australian and New Zealand Society for Geriatric Medicine Position Statement 16 Palliative Care for the Older Person 2009 1) Australia has an increasing ageing population with more people dying at an older age. Older people are more likely to die of illnesses other than cancer, often with multiple medical co- morbidities requiring management. The dying trajectory is usually longer in an older person. 2) Palliative care is an approach that aims to optimise (...) the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problems associated with life- threatening illness. It can be offered at any time after diagnosis of a life-threatening illness and integrated into an overall care plan. The Palliative approach can be practised by all clinicians, with assistance from specialised palliative care services when required. 3) Death is a topic that can be difficult to discuss, so patients and their families may not be well prepared. In particular non-malignant

2009 Australian and New Zealand Society for Geriatric Medicine

183. Medically assisted nutrition for palliative care in adult patients. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Medically assisted nutrition for palliative care in adult patients. Many palliative care patients have a reduced oral intake during their illness. The management of this can include the provision of medically assisted nutrition with the aim of prolonging the length of life of a patient, improving their quality of life, or both.To determine the effect of medically assisted nutrition on the quality and length of life of palliative care patients.Studies were identified from searching The Cochrane (...) -controlled trials (including one qualitative study) that studied medically assisted nutrition in palliative care participants, and one Cochrane systematic review (on Motor Neurone disease), but no RCTs or prospective controlled studies.There are insufficient good quality trials to make any recommendations for practice with regards to the use of medically assisted nutrition in palliative care patients.

2008 Cochrane

184. A critical literature review exploring the challenges of delivering effective palliative care to older people with dementia Full Text available with Trip Pro

A critical literature review exploring the challenges of delivering effective palliative care to older people with dementia This paper considers the challenges of delivering effective palliative care to older people with dementia and the possible strategies to overcome barriers to end-of-life care in these patients.In UK alone, approximately 100,000 people with dementia die each year and as the number of older people increases, dementia is set to become even more prevalent. Dementia (...) is a progressive terminal illness for which there is currently no cure. Patients dying with dementia have significant health-care needs and in recent years it has been recognised that palliative care should be made available to everyone regardless of diagnosis, as this improves comfort and quality of life. Despite this, patients dying with dementia are often still not given access to palliative care services.A review of English language literature published after 1996 to the present day relating to older

2008 EvidenceUpdates

185. Medically assisted hydration for palliative care patients. (Abstract)

Medically assisted hydration for palliative care patients. Many palliative care patients have reduced oral intake during their illness. The management of this can include the provision of medically assisted hydration with the aim of prolonging the length of life of a patient, improving their quality of life, or both.To determine the effect of medically assisted hydration in palliative care patients on their quality and length of life.Studies were identified from searching CENTRAL, MEDLINE (1966 (...) to 2008), EMBASE (1980 to 2008), CINAHL, CANCERLIT, Caresearch, Dissertation abstracts, SCIENCE CITATION INDEX and the reference lists of all eligible studies, key textbooks, and previous systematic reviews. The date of the latest search was February 2008.All relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or prospective controlled studies of medically assisted hydration in palliative care patients.Five relevant studies were identified. These included two RCTs (93 participants), and three prospective

2008 Cochrane

186. Palliative care for patients with head and neck cancer: "I would like a quick return to a normal lifestyle". Full Text available with Trip Pro

Palliative care for patients with head and neck cancer: "I would like a quick return to a normal lifestyle". Head and neck cancers constitute a diverse group of diseases including malignancies of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, sinuses, and skull base. Treatment of these cancers includes a combination of surgical resection, chemotherapy, and radiation. Due to both the patterns of disease recurrence and the adverse effects of treatments, patients with head and neck cancer often have (...) a complex and prolonged course of illness that is marked by periods of freedom from disease and symptoms interspersed with bouts of serious illness, debility, and numerous physical and psychological symptoms including pain, dysphagia, weight loss, disfigurement, depression, and xerostomia. Thus, management of this disease is best provided by an interdisciplinary team that includes individuals from the disciplines of otolaryngology, palliative care, radiation oncology, oncology, nutrition, speech

2008 JAMA

187. Evidence-based interventions to improve the palliative care of pain, dyspnea, and depression at the end of life: a clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians. (Abstract)

Evidence-based interventions to improve the palliative care of pain, dyspnea, and depression at the end of life: a clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians. RECOMMENDATION 1: In patients with serious illness at the end of life, clinicians should regularly assess patients for pain, dyspnea, and depression. (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate quality of evidence.) RECOMMENDATION 2: In patients with serious illness at the end of life, clinicians should use therapies (...) of evidence.) RECOMMENDATION 4: In patients with serious illness at the end of life, clinicians should use therapies of proven effectiveness to manage depression. For patients with cancer, this includes tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or psychosocial intervention. (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate quality of evidence.) RECOMMENDATION 5: Clinicians should ensure that advance care planning, including completion of advance directives, occurs for all patients

2008 Annals of Internal Medicine

188. Family meetings in palliative care: multidisciplinary clinical practice

Family meetings in palliative care: multidisciplinary clinical practice BioMed Central Page 1 of 12 (page number not for citation purposes) BMC Palliative Care Open Access Research article Family meetings in palliative care: Multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines Peter Hudson* 1 , Karen Quinn 1 , Brendan O'Hanlon 2 and Sanchia Aranda 3 Address: 1 Centre for Palliative Care Education & Research, St Vincent's and The University of Melbourne, PO Box 2900, Fitzroy, Victoria 3065, Australia (...) function of palliative care. Family meetings are commonly recommended as a useful way for health care professionals to convey information, discuss goals of care and plan care strategies with patients and family carers. Yet it seems there is insufficient research to demonstrate the utlility of family meetings or the best way to conduct them. This study sought to develop multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines for conducting family meetings in the specialist palliative care setting based

2008 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

189. In-home palliative care increased patient satisfaction and reduced use and costs of medical services

In-home palliative care increased patient satisfaction and reduced use and costs of medical services In-home palliative care increased patient satisfaction and reduced use and costs of medical services | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal (...) accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here In-home palliative care increased patient satisfaction and reduced use and costs of medical services Article Text Therapeutics In-home palliative care increased patient satisfaction

2008 Evidence-Based Medicine

190. Screening for psychological distress in palliative care: a systematic review

Screening for psychological distress in palliative care: a systematic review Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2008 DARE.

191. Palliative care for prison inmates: "don't let me die in prison". Full Text available with Trip Pro

Palliative care for prison inmates: "don't let me die in prison". The number of older inmates in US correctional facilities is increasing and with it the need for quality palliative health care services. Morbidity and mortality are high in this population. Palliative care in the correctional setting includes most of the challenges faced in the free-living community and several unique barriers to inmate care. Successful models of hospice care in prisons have been established and should (...) be disseminated and evaluated. This article highlights why the changing demographics of prison populations necessitates hospice in this setting and highlights many of the barriers that correctional and consulting physicians face while providing palliative care. Issues specific to palliative care and hospice in prison include palliative care standards, inmate-physician and inmate-family relationships, confidentiality, interdisciplinary care, do-not-resuscitate orders and advance medical directives, medical

2007 JAMA

192. Paediatric palliative care: challenges and emerging ideas. (Abstract)

Paediatric palliative care: challenges and emerging ideas. Paediatric palliative care is an emerging subspecialty that focuses on achieving the best possible quality of life for children with life-threatening conditions and their families. To achieve this goal, the individuals working in this field need to: clearly define the population served; better understand the needs of children with life-threatening conditions and their families; develop an approach that will be appropriate across (...) different communities; provide care that responds adequately to suffering; advance strategies that support caregivers and health-care providers; and promote needed change by cultivating educational programmes. Despite these challenges, advances in paediatric palliative care have been achieved in a short period of time; we expect far greater progress as the field becomes more formalised and research networks are established.

2007 Lancet

193. Palliative care for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: "prepare for the worst and hope for the best". Full Text available with Trip Pro

Palliative care for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: "prepare for the worst and hope for the best". Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating terminal neurodegenerative disease with a highly predictable clinical course such that palliative care should begin at or soon after diagnosis. The outcome is certain in most cases. The only medication approved for treatment in the United States, riluzole, extends life by about 2 months. Virtually all skeletal muscles eventually (...) support might be considered. Goals of care should be assessed on an ongoing basis. Presenting the unusual case of a patient with ALS who is also a prominent neurologist specializing in ALS, we enumerate issues in management and palliative care applicable to ALS but also to other fatal, progressive neurologic diseases such as Huntington's chorea and late-stage Parkinson disease.

2007 JAMA

194. Methylnatrexone for opioid induced constipation in advanced illness and palliative care: horizon scanning technology briefing

Methylnatrexone for opioid induced constipation in advanced illness and palliative care: horizon scanning technology briefing Methylnatrexone for opioid induced constipation in advanced illness and palliative care: horizon scanning technology briefing Methylnatrexone for opioid induced constipation in advanced illness and palliative care: horizon scanning technology briefing National Horizon Scanning Centre Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment (...) from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation National Horizon Scanning Centre. Methylnatrexone for opioid induced constipation in advanced illness and palliative care: horizon scanning technology briefing. Birmingham: National Horizon Scanning Centre (NHSC). 2007 Authors' objectives This study examines the use of Methylnatrexone for opioid induced constipation in advanced illness and palliative care. Project page URL Indexing

2007 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

195. The efficacy of acupuncture in the management of chronic pain and in palliative care.

The efficacy of acupuncture in the management of chronic pain and in palliative care. The efficacy of acupuncture in the management of chronic pain and in palliative care. The efficacy of acupuncture in the management of chronic pain and in palliative care. Martinez Pecino F, Sola Arnau I, Betina Nishishinya Aquino M Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made (...) for the HTA database. Citation Martinez Pecino F, Sola Arnau I, Betina Nishishinya Aquino M. The efficacy of acupuncture in the management of chronic pain and in palliative care. Seville: Andalusian Agency for Health Technology Assessment (AETSA). 2007 Authors' objectives The main aim of this review was to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture in the management of chronic pain and in palliative care. Project page URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Acupuncture Therapy; Chronic Disease

2007 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

196. Increased satisfaction with care and lower costs: results of a randomized trial of in-home palliative care

of related interest Brumley RD, Enguidanos S, Cherin D. Effectiveness of a home-based palliative care program for end-of-life. J Palliat Med 2003;6:715–24. Rose JH, O’Toole EE, Dawson NV, et al. Perspectives, preferences, care practices, and outcomes among older and middle-aged patients with late-stage cancer. J Clin Oncol 2004;22:4907–17. Cherin DA, Huba GJ, Steinberg J, et al. Satisfaction with services in innovative managed care programs for groups of traditionally underserved individuals with HIV (...) Increased satisfaction with care and lower costs: results of a randomized trial of in-home palliative care Increased satisfaction with care and lower costs: results of a randomized trial of in-home palliative care Increased satisfaction with care and lower costs: results of a randomized trial of in-home palliative care Brumley R, Enguidanos S, Jamison P, Seitz R, Morgenstern N, Saito S, McIlwane J, Hillary K, Gonzalez J Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation

2007 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

197. UK palliative care professionals identified service infrastructure, patient and carer attitudes and characteristics, and practice culture as influencing place of death of patients with cancer

UK palliative care professionals identified service infrastructure, patient and carer attitudes and characteristics, and practice culture as influencing place of death of patients with cancer UK palliative care professionals identified service infrastructure, patient and carer attitudes and characteristics, and practice culture as influencing place of death of patients with cancer | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you (...) palliative care professionals identified service infrastructure, patient and carer attitudes and characteristics, and practice culture as influencing place of death of patients with cancer Article Text Qualitative UK palliative care professionals identified service infrastructure, patient and carer attitudes and characteristics, and practice culture as influencing place of death of patients with cancer Statistics from Altmetric.com Request Permissions If you wish to reuse any or all of this article

2007 Evidence-Based Nursing

198. Palliative care for frail older adults: "there are things I can't do anymore that I wish I could . . . ". (Abstract)

Palliative care for frail older adults: "there are things I can't do anymore that I wish I could . . . ". Frailty in older adults is increasingly a recognized syndrome of decline, sometimes subtle, in function and health that may be amenable to available approaches to care. Frailty manifests the following core clinical features: loss of strength, weight loss, low levels of activity, poor endurance or fatigue, and slowed performance. The presence of 3 or more of these features is associated (...) with adverse outcomes including falls, new or worsened function impairment, hospitalization, and death. In this article, we use the case of Mrs K to describe the challenges of recognizing frailty in clinical practice, common problems and symptoms that frail older adults experience, and approaches to these issues that clinicians may incorporate into their practices. We discuss the importance of advance care planning, provider-patient communication, and appropriate palliative care and hospice referral

2006 JAMA

199. Laxatives for the management of constipation in palliative care patients. (Abstract)

Laxatives for the management of constipation in palliative care patients. Constipation is a common problem for palliative care patients which can generate considerable suffering for patients due to both the unpleasant physical symptoms and psychological preoccupations that can arise. There is uncertainty about the 'best' management of constipation in palliative care patients and variation in practice between palliative care settings.To determine the effectiveness of laxative administration (...) for the management of constipation in palliative care patients, and the differential efficacy of the laxatives used to manage constipation.We searched The Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue four, 2005), MEDLINE (1966 to January 2005), EMBASE (1980 to January 2005), CANCERLIT, PUBMED, Science Citation Index, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, SIGLE, NTIS, DHSS-DATA, Dissertation Abstracts, Index to Scientific and Technical Proceedings and NHS-NRR and reference lists

2006 Cochrane

200. Reform of drug control policy for palliative care in Romania. (Abstract)

Reform of drug control policy for palliative care in Romania. Unrelieved pain from cancer and HIV/AIDS is a substantial worldwide public-health problem. Inadequate pain relief is partly due to excessively strict national drug-control policies that constrain medical use of essential medicines such as morphine. Romania's drug-control policies are more than 35 years old and impose an antiquated regulatory system that is based on inpatient post-surgical management of acute pain that restricts (...) prescription authority and makes access to opioid treatment difficult for outpatients with severe chronic pain due to cancer or HIV/AIDS. A Ministry of Health palliative-care commission used WHO guidelines to assess and recommend changes to Romania's national drug control law and regulations. The Romanian parliament has adopted a new law that will simplify prescribing requirements and allow modern pain management. Achievement of adequate pain relief is a vital part of worldwide health and will be dependent

2006 Lancet