Latest & greatest articles for obesity

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on obesity or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on obesity and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for obesity

41. Differences in Obesity Prevalence by Demographics and Urbanization in US Children and Adolescents, 2013-2016.

Differences in Obesity Prevalence by Demographics and Urbanization in US Children and Adolescents, 2013-2016. Importance: Differences in childhood obesity by demographics and urbanization have been reported. Objective: To present data on obesity and severe obesity among US youth by demographics and urbanization and to investigate trends by urbanization. Design, Setting, and Participants: Measured weight and height among youth aged 2 to 19 years in the 2001-2016 National Health and Nutrition (...) Examination Surveys, which are serial, cross-sectional, nationally representative surveys of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population. Exposures: Sex, age, race and Hispanic origin, education of household head, and urbanization, as assessed by metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs; large: ≥ 1 million population). Main Outcomes and Measures: Prevalence of obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥95th percentile of US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] growth charts) and severe obesity (BMI ≥120

JAMA2018

42. Differences in Obesity Prevalence by Demographic Characteristics and Urbanization Level Among Adults in the United States, 2013-2016.

Differences in Obesity Prevalence by Demographic Characteristics and Urbanization Level Among Adults in the United States, 2013-2016. Importance: Differences in obesity by sex, age group, race and Hispanic origin among US adults have been reported, but differences by urbanization level have been less studied. Objectives: To provide estimates of obesity by demographic characteristics and urbanization level and to examine trends in obesity prevalence by urbanization level. Design, Setting (...) , and Participants: Serial cross-sectional analysis of measured height and weight among adults aged 20 years or older in the 2001-2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a nationally representative survey of the civilian, noninstitutionalized US population. Exposures: Sex, age group, race and Hispanic origin, education level, smoking status, and urbanization level as assessed by metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs; large: ≥1 million population). Main Outcomes and Measures: Prevalence of obesity

JAMA2018

43. The effect of 12-week garlic supplementation on symptom relief in overweight or obese women with knee osteoarthritis

The effect of 12-week garlic supplementation on symptom relief in overweight or obese women with knee osteoarthritis 29790635 2018 05 23 1742-1241 2018 May 23 International journal of clinical practice Int. J. Clin. Pract. The effect of 12-week garlic supplementation on symptom relief in overweight or obese women with knee osteoarthritis. e13208 10.1111/ijcp.13208 Chronic joint pain and stiffness, and functional disability, are the major debilitating features of osteoarthritis (OA). The aim (...) of this study was to assess the effect of 12-week supplementation with a garlic supplement on knee osteoarthritis outcomes in overweight or obese women. Seventy-six postmenopausal overweight or obese women (25≤BMI≤40 kg/m 2 ) with medically diagnosed knee OA participated in this randomised double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-design trial. After randomisation into 2 groups, patients received a daily dose of either 1000 mg odourless garlic tablet, or placebo, for 12 weeks. The total Western Ontario

EvidenceUpdates2018

44. Antibiotics: repeated treatments before the age of two could be a factor in obesity

Antibiotics: repeated treatments before the age of two could be a factor in obesity Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Antibiotics: repeated treatments before the age of two could be a factor in obesity'', 1 June 2018 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Antibiotics: repeated treatments before the age of two could be a factor in obesity Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  (...)  |  Spotlight Antibiotics: repeated treatments before the age of two could be a factor in obesity Antibiotics disrupt the intestinal flora (intestinal microbiota) and could be a factor in weight gain. Prescription of antibiotics for children should not be automatic but should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Overweight and obesity are the result of an imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure and can be associated with various known genetic, hormone, environmental

Prescrire2018

45. Habit-based interventions for weight loss maintenance in adults with overweight and obesity: a randomized controlled trial

Habit-based interventions for weight loss maintenance in adults with overweight and obesity: a randomized controlled trial 29686382 2018 04 24 1476-5497 2018 Apr 23 International journal of obesity (2005) Int J Obes (Lond) Habit-based interventions for weight loss maintenance in adults with overweight and obesity: a randomized controlled trial. 10.1038/s41366-018-0067-4 The objective of this study was to determine whether habit-based interventions are clinically beneficial in achieving long (...) -term (12-month) weight loss maintenance and explore whether making new habits or breaking old habits is more effective. Volunteer community members aged 18-75 years who had overweight or obesity (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m 2 ) were randomized in a single-blind, three-arm, randomized controlled trial. Ten Top Tips (TTT), Do Something Different (DSD), and the attention-only waitlist (WL) control groups were conducted for 12 weeks from July to October 2015. Participants were followed up post-intervention (all

EvidenceUpdates2018

46. Role of obesity in smoking behaviour: Mendelian randomisation study in UK Biobank.

Role of obesity in smoking behaviour: Mendelian randomisation study in UK Biobank. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether body mass index, body fat percentage, and waist circumference influence smoking status and intensity. DESIGN: Mendelian randomisation study. SETTING: UK Biobank, with replication of results from the Tobacco and Genetics (TAG) consortium. PARTICIPANTS: European descent participants from the UK Biobank cohort (n=372 791) and the TAG consortium (n=74 035). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Risk

BMJ2018

47. The association of obesity with disease activity, functional ability and quality of life in early rheumatoid arthritis: data from the Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Study/Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Network UK prospective cohorts

The association of obesity with disease activity, functional ability and quality of life in early rheumatoid arthritis: data from the Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Study/Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Network UK prospective cohorts 29590474 2018 03 28 1462-0332 2018 Mar 26 Rheumatology (Oxford, England) Rheumatology (Oxford) The association of obesity with disease activity, functional ability and quality of life in early rheumatoid arthritis: data from the Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Study/Early (...) (11 348 measures) showed an increase in BMI of 0.27 U annually (95% CI 0.21, 0.33). Baseline obesity was associated with a significant reduction in the odds of achieving a low year 2 DAS28 [OR 0.52 (95% CI 0.41, 0.650)]. At year 2, HAQ and SF-36 PCS scores were significantly worse but not at year 5 in patients obese at baseline. Obesity at year 2 was associated with higher DAS28 scores at year 2, but not at year 5, and also associated with significantly higher HAQ and SF-36 PCS scores at years 2

EvidenceUpdates2018

48. Comparison of staples vs subcuticular suture in class III obese women undergoing cesarean: a randomized controlled trial

Comparison of staples vs subcuticular suture in class III obese women undergoing cesarean: a randomized controlled trial 29474843 2018 03 30 1097-6868 218 4 2018 Apr American journal of obstetrics and gynecology Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. Comparison of staples vs subcuticular suture in class III obese women undergoing cesarean: a randomized controlled trial. 451.e1-451.e8 S0002-9378(18)30155-8 10.1016/j.ajog.2018.02.011 Obesity is a risk factor for infectious morbidity and wound complications (...) after cesarean delivery. There are currently insufficient data to determine optimal skin closure technique for cesarean delivery, specifically for those women with class III obesity, defined as a body mass index ≥40 kg/m 2 . We sought to compare stainless steel staples vs subcuticular suture for skin closure for cesarean delivery in class III obese women with body mass index ≥40 kg/m 2 . We conducted a randomized controlled trial at 2 teaching hospitals from 2015 through 2016 in which women

EvidenceUpdates2018

49. Metabolically Healthy Obesity, Transition to Metabolic Syndrome, and Cardiovascular Risk

Metabolically Healthy Obesity, Transition to Metabolic Syndrome, and Cardiovascular Risk 29699611 2018 04 27 1558-3597 71 17 2018 May 01 Journal of the American College of Cardiology J. Am. Coll. Cardiol. Metabolically Healthy Obesity, Transition to Metabolic Syndrome, and Cardiovascular Risk. 1857-1865 S0735-1097(18)33496-X 10.1016/j.jacc.2018.02.055 Debate over the cardiometabolic risk associated with metabolically healthy obesity (MHO) continues. Many studies have investigated (...) of obesity (≥30 kg/m 2 ) and MetS (International Diabetes Federation consensus definition) with CVD and mortality across a median of 12.2 years. We tested for interaction and conducted sensitivity analyses for a number of conditions. Compared with metabolically healthy normal weight, baseline MHO was not significantly associated with incident CVD; however, almost one-half of those participants developed MetS during follow-up (unstable MHO). Those who had unstable MHO had increased odds of CVD (odds ratio

EvidenceUpdates2018

50. Weight Control Program and Gestational Weight Gain in Disadvantaged Women with Overweight or Obesity: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Weight Control Program and Gestational Weight Gain in Disadvantaged Women with Overweight or Obesity: A Randomized Clinical Trial 29464907 2018 03 11 1930-739X 26 3 2018 Mar Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) Obesity (Silver Spring) Weight Control Program and Gestational Weight Gain in Disadvantaged Women with Overweight or Obesity: A Randomized Clinical Trial. 485-491 10.1002/oby.22070 This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a home-based lifestyle intervention delivered through Parents (...) as Teachers (PAT) to reduce excessive gestational weight gain (GWG). This was a single-blinded randomized controlled trial conducted as part of the LIFE-Moms consortium at a single university-based tertiary care institution from October 2012 to March 2016. There were 267 socioeconomically disadvantaged (SED) African American women with overweight or obesity (BMI 25.0-45.0 kg/m 2 before pregnancy. Participants were randomized to therapy with standard PAT alone (n = 134) or PAT plus a lifestyle intervention

EvidenceUpdates2018

51. Methods for Evaluating Natural Experiments in Obesity: A Systematic Review.

Methods for Evaluating Natural Experiments in Obesity: A Systematic Review. Background: Given the obesity pandemic, rigorous methodological approaches, including natural experiments, are needed. Purpose: To identify studies that report effects of programs, policies, or built environment changes on obesity prevention and control and to describe their methods. Data Sources: PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and EconLit (January 2000 to August 2017). Study Selection: Natural experiments and experimental (...) studies evaluating a program, policy, or built environment change in U.S. or non-U.S. populations by using measures of obesity or obesity-related health behaviors. Data Extraction: 2 reviewers serially extracted data on study design, population characteristics, data sources and linkages, measures, and analytic methods and independently evaluated risk of bias. Data Synthesis: 294 studies (188 U.S., 106 non-U.S.) were identified, including 156 natural experiments (53%), 118 experimental studies (40

Annals of Internal Medicine2018

52. National Institutes of Health Pathways to Prevention Workshop: Methods for Evaluating Natural Experiments in Obesity.

National Institutes of Health Pathways to Prevention Workshop: Methods for Evaluating Natural Experiments in Obesity. On 5 and 6 December 2017, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened the Pathways to Prevention Workshop: Methods for Evaluating Natural Experiments in Obesity to identify the status of methods for assessing natural experiments to reduce obesity, areas in which these methods could be improved, and research needs for advancing the field. This article considers findings from (...) a systematic evidence review on methods for evaluating natural experiments in obesity, workshop presentations by experts and stakeholders, and public comment. Research gaps are identified, and recommendations related to 4 key issues are provided. Recommendations on population-based data sources and data integration include maximizing use and sharing of existing surveillance and research databases and ensuring significant effort to integrate and link databases. Recommendations on measurement include use

Annals of Internal Medicine2018

53. Weight loss surgery is value for money in selected people with severe obesity

Weight loss surgery is value for money in selected people with severe obesity NIHR DC | Signal - Weight loss surgery is value for money in selected people with severe obesity Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Weight loss surgery is value for money in selected people with severe obesity Published on 23 August 2016 Surgery is a cost-effective method of weight loss for severely and morbidly obese people. This study of general practice data compared health costs (...) and outcomes for people with severe or morbid obesity who underwent surgery and those who did not. Surgery was associated with a reduced chance of developing diabetes and an increased chance of remission in people with diabetes. It was more cost-effective – using NHS thresholds – for morbidly obese people who had diabetes, than for those without diabetes. Weight loss surgery either reduces the amount of food people can consume or the amount of energy they can absorb from food. A quarter of UK adults

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

54. A behavioural intervention for obese pregnant women did not reduce risk of diabetes

A behavioural intervention for obese pregnant women did not reduce risk of diabetes NIHR DC | Signal - A behavioural intervention for obese pregnant women did not reduce risk of diabetes Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal A behavioural intervention for obese pregnant women did not reduce risk of diabetes Published on 4 November 2015 This large NIHR-funded UK trial found that a behavioural intervention for obese pregnant women did not reduce their risk (...) the apparent effectiveness of the intervention. The trial result does emphasise the need to follow NICE recommendations to test for diabetes in all pregnant women with obesity. Why was this study needed? Obesity rates in UK women have risen between 1993 and 2011 from 16% to 26%. Rates of gestational diabetes are also increasing. Women who are obese when they become pregnant have a higher risk of developing diabetes, high blood pressure, or having babies that are on average larger than the duration

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

55. Weight loss surgery for obesity can lead to substantial weight loss and improved health outcomes

Weight loss surgery for obesity can lead to substantial weight loss and improved health outcomes NIHR DC | Signal - Weight loss surgery for obesity can lead to substantial weight loss and improved health outcomes Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Weight loss surgery for obesity can lead to substantial weight loss and improved health outcomes Published on 9 February 2016 On average people lost 5 kg more in each of the first four months after weight loss surgery (...) than those of a similar weight who did not undergo surgery. The risks of developing type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure were reduced. Surgery was linked to reduced risk of heart disease and sleep-related breathing problems. Those entering the trial had an average BMI of 44.7 kg/m2. Rates of obesity are high in the UK, around a quarter of the adult population is obese, and rising every year. Obesity is linked with health conditions such as type 2 diabetes, which is expensive to manage and has

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

56. Giving obese pregnant women metformin had no effect on baby’s weight at birth

Giving obese pregnant women metformin had no effect on baby’s weight at birth NIHR DC | Signal - Giving obese pregnant women metformin had no effect on baby’s weight at birth Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Giving obese pregnant women metformin had no effect on baby’s weight at birth Published on 15 September 2015 A large trial found that giving obese pregnant women the diabetes drug, metformin, to prevent heavier babies, had no effect compared with an inactive (...) 12 weeks of a mother’s pregnancy to a baby’s birth. The researchers now aim to track the children’s weight and health beyond birth to see if there are any other long-term benefits or side-effects. For now, the results show metformin does not work for this purpose. Why was this study needed? Almost a quarter of women (24%) were obese in 2013 in England. This is up from 16% 20 years earlier. Obese pregnant women are more likely than other women to give birth to heavier babies, and some evidence

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

57. Takeaways linked to increased cardiovascular risk factors and obesity in children

Takeaways linked to increased cardiovascular risk factors and obesity in children NIHR DC | Signal - Takeaways linked to increased cardiovascular risk factors and obesity in children Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Takeaways linked to increased cardiovascular risk factors and obesity in children Published on 13 February 2018 Children who eat takeaways once or more each week have more body fat and higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL) “bad” cholesterol levels than those who (...) never or hardly ever eat them. Their diets were also higher in fat and lower in protein and calcium. This cross-sectional study looked in depth at eating habits and risk markers for coronary heart disease, obesity and diabetes in 2,529 children in England. Though this type of study can only show an association between takeaways and risk markers, it is one of the first of its type, and the results do give cause for concern. Increasing numbers of people are eating takeaways in the UK. Local

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

58. Being overweight or obese is linked with heart disease even without other metabolic risk factors

Being overweight or obese is linked with heart disease even without other metabolic risk factors NIHR DC | Signal - Being overweight or obese is linked with heart disease even without other metabolic risk factors Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Being overweight or obese is linked with heart disease even without other metabolic risk factors Published on 7 November 2017 People with certain metabolic risk factors who are obese are two and a half times as likely (...) to develop heart disease as healthy people of normal weight. But those who are obese without these other risk factors still have a 28% increased risk of heart disease compared with healthy people of normal weight. This suggests excess weight should be seen as an independent risk factor, challenging the idea that people can be “fat but fit”. Metabolic risk factors for heart disease cluster together and in this large study the researchers defined “metabolically healthy” as not having; high blood pressure

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

59. Resistance training may prevent obese older people becoming frail when losing weight

Resistance training may prevent obese older people becoming frail when losing weight NIHR DC | Signal - Resistance training may prevent obese older people becoming frail when losing weight Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Resistance training may prevent obese older people becoming frail when losing weight Published on 29 August 2017 Combining resistance training with aerobic exercise increased physical function in older, obese adults who were following a weight (...) loss programme. Functional improvements, such as the speed to stand from a chair or to climb stairs, were greater with combination training (21%) than with either type of exercise performed alone (14%). This randomised controlled trial assigned 160 obese adults in the USA (aged over 65, mostly educated white females) to the different types of exercise for six months. Those exercising lost about 9% body weight on their diets. Resistance training was most effective for preventing loss of muscle

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

60. Intensive lifestyle interventions can help obese young people lose weight

Intensive lifestyle interventions can help obese young people lose weight NIHR DC | Signal - Intensive lifestyle interventions can help obese young people lose weight Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Intensive lifestyle interventions can help obese young people lose weight Published on 19 September 2017 Obese children and adolescents can lose up to seven pounds over six to 12 months when they engage in at least 52 hours of behaviour-based lifestyle interventions (...) . Minimal benefit was seen with shorter contact time, with less than 25 hours ineffective. The control group gained weight. Rising obesity in the young is a global concern, which may lead to high rates of obesity-related diseases in adulthood. This review identified trials covering various weight management strategies. Lifestyle-based-interventions with sufficient contact time – as recommended by UK guidelines – showed clear benefits with no evidence of harms. Investing in effective strategies to manage

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018