Latest & greatest articles for nsaids

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Top results for nsaids

1. Topical NSAIDs: good relief for acute musculoskeletal pain

Topical NSAIDs: good relief for acute musculoskeletal pain Topical NSAIDs: good relief for acute musculoskeletal pain - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By June 25, 2015 // Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are routinely prescribed for mild to moderate pain and are the most commonly prescribed painkilling drugs worldwide. Taken by mouth or injected into a vein, the high concentrations of the drug throughout the body, necessary in order to work at the site of pain (...) and inflammation, can cause unpleasant or even serious side effects. Applied to the skin, so in a topical preparation such as a gel, cream or plaster, they can act where needed to relieve pain without affecting the rest of the body. For superficial painful conditions like sprains, strains and muscle soreness (and where the skin is unbroken) topical NSAIDs offer this clear advantage over taking tablets, as long as they work. How good are topical NSAIDs? A has been updated with new research confirming

2015 Evidently Cochrane

2. NSAIDs - prescribing issues

NSAIDs - prescribing issues NSAIDs - prescribing issues - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share NSAIDs - prescribing issues: Summary Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have analgesic, antipyretic and, at higher doses, anti-inflammatory actions. NSAIDs inhibit prostaglandin synthesis by reversibly inhibiting cyclo-oxygenase (COX) enzymes — the two main types of COX enzyme are COX-1 and COX-2, which have different physiological functions. COX-1 produces prostaglandins that help (...) to maintain gastric mucosal integrity and platelet-initiated blood clotting. Inhibition is thought to be responsible for gastrointestinal toxicity. COX-2 produces prostaglandins that mediate pain and inflammation. Inhibition is thought to be responsible for the anti-inflammatory action of NSAIDs. NSAIDs vary in how selective they are for COX-1 and COX-2 pathways and the degree of selectivity for COX-1 relative to COX-2 can be used to classify NSAIDs: Standard NSAIDs — these are nonselective NSAIDs

2013 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

3. Systematic review: Topical NSAIDs significantly reduces pain in adults with acute musculoskeletal injuries

Systematic review: Topical NSAIDs significantly reduces pain in adults with acute musculoskeletal injuries Topical NSAIDs significantly reduces pain in adults with acute musculoskeletal injuries | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts (...) OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Topical NSAIDs significantly reduces pain in adults with acute musculoskeletal injuries Article Text Therapeutics/Prevention Systematic review Topical NSAIDs significantly reduces pain in adults

2016 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

4. NSAIDs: Are They All the Same?

NSAIDs: Are They All the Same? NSAIDs: Are They All the Same? – Clinical Correlations Search NSAIDs: Are They All the Same? February 1, 2018 5 min read By Vishal Shah, MD Peer Reviewed Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a heterogenous group of non-opioid analgesics and anti-inflammatory agents. Their use is ubiquitous, from treating a simple tension headache to a sprained ankle. NSAIDs are available over the counter and in prescription form. NSAID use in the United States (...) of opioids and addictive nature of these agents, . 3 NSAIDs inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX), an enzyme involved in the production of prostaglandins. Although COX-1 is present in most tissues, it plays a crucial role in gastric cytoprotection and platelet aggregation. COX-2 is primarily involved in the inflammatory response, with additional role in vasoprotection and regulation of renal blood flow. Based on their COX-2 selectivity, NSAIDs can be grouped into 3 categories: Non-selective (ibuprofen, naproxen

2018 Clinical Correlations

5. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for chronic non-cancer pain in children and adolescents. (Full text)

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for chronic non-cancer pain in children and adolescents. Pain is a common feature of childhood and adolescence around the world, and for many young people, that pain is chronic. The World Health Organization guidelines for pharmacological treatments for children's persisting pain acknowledge that pain in children is a major public health concern of high significance in most parts of the world. While in the past pain was largely dismissed (...) ) is a major health concern. Chronic pain (that is pain lasting three months or longer) can arise in the paediatric population in a variety of pathophysiological classifications (nociceptive, neuropathic, or idiopathic) from genetic conditions, nerve damage pain, chronic musculoskeletal pain, and chronic abdominal pain, as well as for other unknown reasons.Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to treat pain, reduce fever, and for their anti-inflammation properties. They are commonly used

2017 Cochrane PubMed

6. Systematic review with meta-analysis: Topical NSAIDS provide effective pain relief for patients with hand or knee osteoarthritis with similar efficacy, and fewer side effects, than oral NSAIDS

Systematic review with meta-analysis: Topical NSAIDS provide effective pain relief for patients with hand or knee osteoarthritis with similar efficacy, and fewer side effects, than oral NSAIDS Topical NSAIDS provide effective pain relief for patients with hand or knee osteoarthritis with similar efficacy, and fewer side effects, than oral NSAIDS | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie (...) settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Topical NSAIDS provide effective pain

2013 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

7. Topical NSAIDs versus Opioids for Acute Musculoskeletal Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness

Topical NSAIDs versus Opioids for Acute Musculoskeletal Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness Topical NSAIDs versus Opioids for Acute Musculoskeletal Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Topical NSAIDs versus Opioids for Acute Musculoskeletal Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness Topical NSAIDs versus Opioids for Acute Musculoskeletal Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness Published on: January 30, 2017 Project Number: RC0844 (...) -000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary with Critical Appraisal Result type: Report Question What is the comparative clinical effectiveness of topical NSAIDs versus opioids for the treatment of acute musculoskeletal pain? Key Message Compared with placebo, topical NSAIDs were effective in reducing pain from acute musculoskeletal conditions, such as sprains, strains or sport injuries. Adverse events were rare and were usually related to skin reactions. No evidence regarding

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

8. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): cardiovascular risks

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): cardiovascular risks Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): cardiovascular risks - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. or Search Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): cardiovascular risks Further evidence that the cardiovascular risk with diclofenac is higher than other non-selective NSAIDs and similar to the selective COX-2 inhibitors. Published 11 December 2014 From: Therapeutic area: , Article date: October (...) 2012 A new review on the cardiovascular safety of NSAIDs has highlighted further evidence that diclofenac is associated with cardiovascular risks that are higher than the other non-selective NSAIDs, and similar to the selective COX-2 inhibitors. Naproxen and low-dose ibuprofen are still considered to have the most favourable cardiovascular safety profiles of all non-selective NSAIDs. This review, by the European Medicines Agency’s (CHMP), evaluated all available data on this issue since the last

2012 MHRA Drug Safety Update

9. Acute gout: Oral steroids work as well as NSAIDs

Acute gout: Oral steroids work as well as NSAIDs Acute gout: Oral steroids work as well as NSAIDs Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics Acute gout: Oral steroids work as well as NSAIDs View/ Open Date 2008-10 Format Metadata Abstract Use a short course of oral steroids (prednisone 30-40mg/d for 5 days (...) ) for treatment of acute gout when nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are contraindicated. Steroids are also a reasonable choice as first-line treatment. Stength of recommendation: B: 2 good-quality, randomized controlled trials (RCTs). URI Part of Citation Journal of Family Practice, 57(10) 2008: 655-657. Rights OpenAccess. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License. Collections hosted by hosted by

2019 PURLS

10. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): avoid cox-2 inhibitors, diclofenac and high-dose ibuprofen

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): avoid cox-2 inhibitors, diclofenac and high-dose ibuprofen Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): avoid cox-2 inhibitors, diclofenac and high-dose ibuprofen'', 1 January 2016 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): avoid cox-2 inhibitors, diclofenac and high-dose ibuprofen Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |  (...)  |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): avoid cox-2 inhibitors, diclofenac and high-dose ibuprofen When pain medication is required, paracetamol (alias acetaminophen) is the reference drug. Among the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), naproxen or ibuprofen (not exceeding 1200 mg a day) are the drugs that carry the least exposure to cardiac disorders. When pain medication is needed

2016 Prescrire

12. Effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on bone fracture healing

Effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on bone fracture healing Effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on bone fracture healing Effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on bone fracture healing Tsertsvadze A, Leas B, Umscheid CA Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Tsertsvadze A, Leas B, Umscheid (...) CA. Effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on bone fracture healing. Philadelphia: Center for Evidence-based Practice (CEP). 2013 Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; Fracture Healing; Fractures, Bones Language Published English Country of organisation United States English summary An English language summary is available. Address for correspondence Center for Evidence-based Practice, University

2013 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

13. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and risk for bleeding after gastrointestinal surgery

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and risk for bleeding after gastrointestinal surgery Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and risk for bleeding after gastrointestinal surgery We use cookies on this website. By using this site, you agree that we may store and access cookies on your device. Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and risk for bleeding after gastrointestinal surgery Share (...) : Reading time approx. 4 minutes This document was published more than 2 years ago. The nature of the evidence may have changed. NSAIDs are a class of drugs that are anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic but which also leads to an increased risk of bleeding. SBU Enquiry Service consists of systematic literature searches to highlight studies that can address questions received by the SBU Enquiry Service from Swedish healthcare or social service providers. Relevant references are compiled by an SBU

2015 Swedish Council on Technology Assessement

14. A clinical study on glucosamine sulfate versus combination of glucosamine sulfate and NSAIDs in mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis. (Full text)

A clinical study on glucosamine sulfate versus combination of glucosamine sulfate and NSAIDs in mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis. Glucosamine may be effective in treating and possibly slowing the progression of Osteoarthritis (OA). It is believed Glucosamine supplements may help to stop cartilage breakdown, build cartilage and decrease swelling.The objective of this study was glucosamine sulfate versus combination of glucosamine sulfate and Non-Steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID (...) ), with a combination of GS and NSAIDs reducing VAS pain scores. Thus, it is found that Group B treatments over 4 and 12 weeks produced improved WOMAC and VAS grades.Study results may suggest that the Glucosamine Sulfate has a carryover effect like Disease modifying agents. Long-term treatment of Glucosamine Sulfate may reduce the dependence of NSAIDs usage and delay the disease progression. Thereby we can reduce the NSAIDs side effects and improve the patient's quality of life.

2012 TheScientificWorldJournal PubMed

15. Topical NSAIDs for chronic musculoskeletal pain in adults. (Full text)

Topical NSAIDs for chronic musculoskeletal pain in adults. Use of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to treat chronic musculoskeletal conditions has become widely accepted because they can provide pain relief without associated systemic adverse events. This review is an update of 'Topical NSAIDs for chronic musculoskeletal pain in adults', originally published in Issue 9, 2012.To review the evidence from randomised, double-blind, controlled trials on the efficacy and safety (...) of topically applied NSAIDs for chronic musculoskeletal pain in adults.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and our own in-house database; the date of the last search was February 2016. We also searched the references lists of included studies and reviews, and sought unpublished studies by asking personal contacts and searching online clinical trial registers and manufacturers' web sites.We included randomised, double-blind, active or inert carrier

2016 Cochrane PubMed

16. Systematic review with meta-analysis: NSAID use associated with increased cardiovascular risk and death, but naproxen appears to be the least harmful

Systematic review with meta-analysis: NSAID use associated with increased cardiovascular risk and death, but naproxen appears to be the least harmful NSAID use associated with increased cardiovascular risk and death, but naproxen appears to be the least harmful | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see (...) our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here NSAID use associated with increased cardiovascular risk and death, but naproxen appears to be the least harmful Article Text

2011 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

17. NSAIDs as treatment for uncomplicated urinary tract infections (Full text)

NSAIDs as treatment for uncomplicated urinary tract infections NSAIDs as treatment for uncomplicated urinary tract infections – Morsels of Evidence \t\t\t\r\n\t\t\t \t\t\t\r\n\t\t\t Like this: Like Loading... ","author":{"@type":"Person","name":"Michael Tam"},"image":["https:\/\/evidencebasedmedicine.com.au\/wp-content\/uploads\/2017\/06\/mo2017-5.png"]} Toggle search form Toggle navigation Evidence-based medicine for general practitioners Jun 09 2017 NSAIDs as treatment for uncomplicated (...) urinary tract infections By in , , Journal reference: Gagyor I, Bleidorn J, Kochen MM, Schmiemann G, Wegscheider K, Hummers-Pradier E. Ibuprofen versus fosfomycin for uncomplicated urinary tract infection in women: randomised controlled trial. Bmj 2015 Dec 23;351:h6544. Link: Published: December 2015 Evidence cookie says… NSAIDs should not be recommended as a first line treatment for uncomplicated UTIs in women compared with women who received empirical antibiotics, those who received regular

2017 Morsels of Evidence PubMed

18. Randomised controlled trial: NSAIDs or paracetamol for short-term treatment of mild to moderate knee pain in early osteoarthritis: are they equivalent?

Randomised controlled trial: NSAIDs or paracetamol for short-term treatment of mild to moderate knee pain in early osteoarthritis: are they equivalent? NSAIDs or paracetamol for short-term treatment of mild to moderate knee pain in early osteoarthritis: are they equivalent? | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies (...) , please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here NSAIDs or paracetamol for short-term treatment of mild to moderate knee pain in early osteoarthritis

2016 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

19. Paracetamol, NSAIDS and opioid analgesics for chronic low back pain: a network meta-analysis [Cochrane protocol]

Paracetamol, NSAIDS and opioid analgesics for chronic low back pain: a network meta-analysis [Cochrane protocol] Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence

2018 PROSPERO