Latest & greatest articles for nsaids

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Top results for nsaids

61. Systematic review: No difference in pain, swelling or function with NSAIDs compared with paracetamol for soft tissue injury

Systematic review: No difference in pain, swelling or function with NSAIDs compared with paracetamol for soft tissue injury No difference in pain, swelling or function with NSAIDs compared with paracetamol for soft tissue injury | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username (...) and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here No difference in pain, swelling or function with NSAIDs compared with paracetamol for soft tissue injury Article Text Pain management Systematic review No difference

2016 Evidence-Based Nursing

62. Systematic review: Topical NSAIDs significantly reduces pain in adults with acute musculoskeletal injuries

Systematic review: Topical NSAIDs significantly reduces pain in adults with acute musculoskeletal injuries Topical NSAIDs significantly reduces pain in adults with acute musculoskeletal injuries | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts (...) OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Topical NSAIDs significantly reduces pain in adults with acute musculoskeletal injuries Article Text Therapeutics/Prevention Systematic review Topical NSAIDs significantly reduces pain in adults

2016 Evidence-Based Medicine

63. Efficacy of NSAIDs therapy in patients with retinopathy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Efficacy of NSAIDs therapy in patients with retinopathy: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address

2016 PROSPERO

64. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): avoid cox-2 inhibitors, diclofenac and high-dose ibuprofen

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): avoid cox-2 inhibitors, diclofenac and high-dose ibuprofen Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): avoid cox-2 inhibitors, diclofenac and high-dose ibuprofen'', 1 January 2016 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): avoid cox-2 inhibitors, diclofenac and high-dose ibuprofen Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |  (...)  |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): avoid cox-2 inhibitors, diclofenac and high-dose ibuprofen When pain medication is required, paracetamol (alias acetaminophen) is the reference drug. Among the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), naproxen or ibuprofen (not exceeding 1200 mg a day) are the drugs that carry the least exposure to cardiac disorders. When pain medication is needed

2016 Prescrire

65. Does the use of NSAIDs amongst patients with long-bone fractures increase the risk of non-union: a systematic review

Does the use of NSAIDs amongst patients with long-bone fractures increase the risk of non-union: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence

2016 PROSPERO

66. The effect of NSAIDs on the osteogenic activity in osseointegration

The effect of NSAIDs on the osteogenic activity in osseointegration Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing and effect measures

2016 PROSPERO

67. Combination of topical NSAIDs and anti-VEGF for age-related macular degeneration treatment

Combination of topical NSAIDs and anti-VEGF for age-related macular degeneration treatment Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address

2016 PROSPERO

68. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) versus opioids (update) and NSAIDS versus paracetamol in the management of acute renal colic: protocol for a systematic review

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) versus opioids (update) and NSAIDS versus paracetamol in the management of acute renal colic: protocol for a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email

2016 PROSPERO

69. Rectal NSAIDs for the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Rectal NSAIDs for the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation

2016 PROSPERO

70. NSAIDs: Inflamed effects on inflammation?

NSAIDs: Inflamed effects on inflammation? Tools for Practice is proudly sponsored by the Alberta College of Family Physicians (ACFP). ACFP is a provincial, professional voluntary organization, representing more than 4,000 family physicians, family medicine residents and medical students in Alberta. Established over fifty years ago, the ACFP strives for excellence in family practice through advocacy, continuing medical education and primary care research. www.acfp.ca March 29, 2016 NSAIDs (...) : Inflamed effects on inflammation? Clinical Question: Do non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduce swelling and inflammation in acute injury? Bottom Line: Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) of NSAIDs effect on musculoskeletal injury swelling show highly inconsistent results: Some slight improvements (2-11%), some slight worsening (8%) and most no effect. It is unlikely NSAIDs have any reliable effect on acute injury swelling but they do improve pain for ~1 in 4 over one week. Evidence

2016 Tools for Practice

71. Effect of Opioids vs NSAIDs and Larger vs Smaller Chest Tube Size on Pain Control and Pleurodesis Efficacy Among Patients With Malignant Pleural Effusion: The TIME1 Randomized Clinical Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of Opioids vs NSAIDs and Larger vs Smaller Chest Tube Size on Pain Control and Pleurodesis Efficacy Among Patients With Malignant Pleural Effusion: The TIME1 Randomized Clinical Trial. For treatment of malignant pleural effusion, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are avoided because they may reduce pleurodesis efficacy. Smaller chest tubes may be less painful than larger tubes, but efficacy in pleurodesis has not been proven.To assess the effect of chest tube size (...) and analgesia (NSAIDs vs opiates) on pain and clinical efficacy related to pleurodesis in patients with malignant pleural effusion.A 2×2 factorial phase 3 randomized clinical trial among 320 patients requiring pleurodesis in 16 UK hospitals from 2007 to 2013.Patients undergoing thoracoscopy (n = 206; clinical decision if biopsy was required) received a 24F chest tube and were randomized to receive opiates (n = 103) vs NSAIDs (n = 103), and those not undergoing thoracoscopy (n = 114) were randomized to 1

2015 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

72. For Patients Undergoing Open-Flap Debridement Surgery, There is No Significant Difference Between Dexamethasone and NSAIDs For Reducing Patient Perceived Pain

For Patients Undergoing Open-Flap Debridement Surgery, There is No Significant Difference Between Dexamethasone and NSAIDs For Reducing Patient Perceived Pain UTCAT2956, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title For Patients Undergoing Open-Flap Debridement Surgery, There is No Significant Difference Between Dexamethasone and NSAIDs For Reducing Patient Perceived Pain Clinical Question In adults undergoing (...) periodontal surgery, what is the effect of dexamethasone on patient perceived pain as compared to traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatories? Clinical Bottom Line Dexamethasone and NSAIDs are equally effective in reducing patient perceived pain following periodontal open flap debridement surgeries. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Steffens/2010 15 adult patients receiving periodontal surgery

2015 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

73. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for axial spondyloarthritis (ankylosing spondylitis and non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis). (Abstract)

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for axial spondyloarthritis (ankylosing spondylitis and non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis). Axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) comprises ankylosing spondylitis (radiographic axSpA) and non-radiographic (nr-)axSpA and is associated with psoriasis, uveitis and inflammatory bowel disease. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are recommended as first-line drug treatment.To determine the benefits and harms of NSAIDs in axSpA.We searched (...) CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE to 18 June 2014.Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs of NSAIDs versus placebo or any comparator in adults with axSpA and observational cohort studies studying the long term effect (≥ six months) of NSAIDs on radiographic progression or adverse events (AEs). The main comparions were traditional or COX-2 NSAIDs versus placebo. The major outcomes were pain, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index

2015 Cochrane

74. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and non-opioids for acute renal colic. (Abstract)

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and non-opioids for acute renal colic. Renal colic is acute pain caused by urinary stones. The prevalence of urinary stones is between 10% and 15% in the United States, making renal colic one of the common reasons for urgent urological care. The pain is usually severe and the first step in the management is adequate analgesia. Many different classes of medications have been used in this regard including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (...) and narcotics.The aim of this review was to assess benefits and harms of different NSAIDs and non-opioids in the treatment of adult patients with acute renal colic and if possible to determine which medication (or class of medications) are more appropriate for this purpose. Clinically relevant outcomes such as efficacy of pain relief, time to pain relief, recurrence of pain, need for rescue medication and side effects were explored.We searched the Cochrane Renal Group's Specialised Register (to 27 November 2014

2015 Cochrane

75. Topical NSAIDs: good relief for acute musculoskeletal pain

Topical NSAIDs: good relief for acute musculoskeletal pain Topical NSAIDs: good relief for acute musculoskeletal pain - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By June 25, 2015 // Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are routinely prescribed for mild to moderate pain and are the most commonly prescribed painkilling drugs worldwide. Taken by mouth or injected into a vein, the high concentrations of the drug throughout the body, necessary in order to work at the site of pain (...) and inflammation, can cause unpleasant or even serious side effects. Applied to the skin, so in a topical preparation such as a gel, cream or plaster, they can act where needed to relieve pain without affecting the rest of the body. For superficial painful conditions like sprains, strains and muscle soreness (and where the skin is unbroken) topical NSAIDs offer this clear advantage over taking tablets, as long as they work. How good are topical NSAIDs? A has been updated with new research confirming

2015 Evidently Cochrane

76. Topical NSAIDs for acute musculoskeletal pain in adults. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Topical NSAIDs for acute musculoskeletal pain in adults. Use of topical NSAIDs to treat acute musculoskeletal conditions has become widely accepted because they can provide pain relief without associated systemic adverse events. This review is an update of 'Topical NSAIDs for acute pain in adults' originally published in Issue 6, 2010.To determine the efficacy and safety of topically applied NSAIDs in acute musculoskeletal pain in adults.We searched the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (...) particularly interested to compare different formulations (gel, cream, plaster) of individual NSAIDs.For this update we added 14 new included studies (3489 participants), and excluded four studies. We also identified 20 additional reports of completed or ongoing studies that have not been published in full. The earlier review included 47 studies.This update included 61 studies. Most compared topical NSAIDs in the form of a gel, spray, or cream with a similar topical placebo; 5311 participants were treated

2015 Cochrane

77. Association of aspirin and NSAID use with risk of colorectal cancer according to genetic variants. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Association of aspirin and NSAID use with risk of colorectal cancer according to genetic variants. Use of aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer.To identify common genetic markers that may confer differential benefit from aspirin or NSAID chemoprevention, we tested gene × environment interactions between regular use of aspirin and/or NSAIDs and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in relation to risk of colorectal (...) cancer.Case-control study using data from 5 case-control and 5 cohort studies initiated between 1976 and 2003 across the United States, Canada, Australia, and Germany and including colorectal cancer cases (n=8634) and matched controls (n=8553) ascertained between 1976 and 2011. Participants were all of European descent.Genome-wide SNP data and information on regular use of aspirin and/or NSAIDs and other risk factors.Colorectal cancer.Regular use of aspirin and/or NSAIDs was associated with lower risk

2015 JAMA

78. Evaluating the true risk of post-operative NSAIDS use and anastomotic leak: a meta-analysis of observational studies and controlled trials

Evaluating the true risk of post-operative NSAIDS use and anastomotic leak: a meta-analysis of observational studies and controlled trials Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne

2015 PROSPERO

79. Safety and efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for spinal pain and osteoarthritis: systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised placebo-controlled trials

Safety and efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for spinal pain and osteoarthritis: systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised placebo-controlled trials Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email

2015 PROSPERO

80. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for axial spondyloarthritis (ankylosing spondylitis and non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis) [Cochrane Protocol]

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for axial spondyloarthritis (ankylosing spondylitis and non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis) [Cochrane Protocol] Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g

2015 PROSPERO