Latest & greatest articles for nsaids

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Top results for nsaids

41. Topical NSAIDs versus Opioids for Acute Musculoskeletal Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness

Topical NSAIDs versus Opioids for Acute Musculoskeletal Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness Topical NSAIDs versus Opioids for Acute Musculoskeletal Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Topical NSAIDs versus Opioids for Acute Musculoskeletal Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness Topical NSAIDs versus Opioids for Acute Musculoskeletal Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness Published on: January 30, 2017 Project Number: RC0844 (...) -000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary with Critical Appraisal Result type: Report Question What is the comparative clinical effectiveness of topical NSAIDs versus opioids for the treatment of acute musculoskeletal pain? Key Message Compared with placebo, topical NSAIDs were effective in reducing pain from acute musculoskeletal conditions, such as sprains, strains or sport injuries. Adverse events were rare and were usually related to skin reactions. No evidence regarding

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

42. Safety of topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) for osteoarthritis: a systematic review with meta-analysis

Safety of topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) for osteoarthritis: a systematic review with meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence

2017 PROSPERO

43. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) for trigger finger [Cochrane protocol]

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) for trigger finger [Cochrane protocol] Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing

2017 PROSPERO

44. The use of aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and ovarian cancer survival

The use of aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and ovarian cancer survival Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web

2017 PROSPERO

47. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) toxicity - emergency management

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) toxicity - emergency management

2017 DynaMed Plus

49. Aspirin and Other NSAID use in relation to its potential mechanisms for pancreas cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Aspirin and Other NSAID use in relation to its potential mechanisms for pancreas cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne

2017 PROSPERO

50. Potential problems associated with the use of over-the-counter NSAIDS in geriatrics

Potential problems associated with the use of over-the-counter NSAIDS in geriatrics Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing

2017 PROSPERO

51. Side effects of topical Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) in osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised, placebo-controlled Trials

Side effects of topical Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) in osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised, placebo-controlled Trials Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation

2017 PROSPERO

52. Impact of Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) on Crohn's disease progression after diagnosis: systematic review and meta-analysis

Impact of Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) on Crohn's disease progression after diagnosis: systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne

2017 PROSPERO

53. NSAID usage in sickle cell disease vaso-occlusive crisis

NSAID usage in sickle cell disease vaso-occlusive crisis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing and effect measures Timing

2017 PROSPERO

54. Musculoskeletal Strains and Sprains - Guidelines for Prescribing NSAIDs

Musculoskeletal Strains and Sprains - Guidelines for Prescribing NSAIDs Musculoskeletal Strains and Sprains - Guidelines for Prescribing NSAIDs - medSask Home - College of Pharmacy and Nutrition - University of Saskatchewan Toggle Menu Search the U of S Search Musculoskeletal Strains and Sprains - Guidelines for Prescribing NSAIDs Musculoskeletal pain arises from the muscles, bones, joints, and connective tissue. The musculoskeletal system includes the muscles, tendons, ligaments, cartilage (...) with the differential assessment. Diabetes - expect longer healing times Stroke - could cause one-sided weakness Cancer - pain with no apparent cause could be a sign of worsening cancer control in a patient with a history of cancer Bleeding disorders - avoid NSAIDs in these patients History of DVT - significant leg or calf pain may be a sign of a DVT, especially in a patient who has had a prior DVT GI disorders - may choose to avoid NSAIDs in these patients Cardiovascular disorders - may choose to avoid NSAIDs

2017 medSask

55. Safety considerations for NSAIDs

Safety considerations for NSAIDs Vol 24. DTB: Vol 24, No 2 - navarra.es Castellano | Euskara | Français | English Use the search tool! Search engine : : : : : : DTB: Vol 24, No 2 DTB: Vol 24, No 2 Content tools Share it Safety considerations for NSAIDs The gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and renal adverse effects of NSAIDs are related to the total daily dose and may appear less than 15 days from the start of treatment. The safest NSAIDs are ibuprofen and naproxen, whether used alone (...) . Although gastrointestinal risk can be countered using gastric protectors, there is no concomitant drug therapy for cardiovascular risk. The results of this review reveal an overuse of celecoxib and etoricoxib in Navarre. NSAIDs in combination with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) should be used with caution, since PPIs are not indicated for all patients requiring NSAIDs. Furthermore, the combination of these drugs may result in incorrect dosages. Authors: Isabel Aranguren. Pharmacist. Navarre Health

2016 Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin of Navarre (Spain)

56. Can topical NSAIDs help relieve the pain of arthritis?

Can topical NSAIDs help relieve the pain of arthritis? Can topical NSAIDs help relieve the pain of arthritis? - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By May 6, 2016 // A blog for non-medical readers by Lynda Ware, Senior Fellow in General Practice with Cochrane UK. “Just put some cream on it….” According to my three daughters, this was my stock response to any request they made for motherly intervention when pain struck. Whilst refuting this slur utterly (and the one about not even looking), I (...) might now point them in the direction of this updated review, which assesses the efficacy and safety of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), albeit in the context of chronic musculoskeletal pain rather than a bruised shin or finger. What’s more, I will point out that it’s likely that the carrier, to which the active drug is added, is pretty effective in its own right. Why is this important? Topical NSAIDs can act precisely where needed and without having to be absorbed via

2016 Evidently Cochrane

57. Can topical NSAIDs help relieve the pain of arthritis?

Can topical NSAIDs help relieve the pain of arthritis? Can topical NSAIDs help relieve the pain of arthritis? - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By May 6, 2016 // A blog for non-medical readers by Lynda Ware, Senior Fellow in General Practice with Cochrane UK. “Just put some cream on it….” According to my three daughters, this was my stock response to any request they made for motherly intervention when pain struck. Whilst refuting this slur utterly (and the one about not even looking), I (...) might now point them in the direction of this updated review, which assesses the efficacy and safety of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), albeit in the context of chronic musculoskeletal pain rather than a bruised shin or finger. What’s more, I will point out that it’s likely that the carrier, to which the active drug is added, is pretty effective in its own right. Why is this important? Topical NSAIDs can act precisely where needed and without having to be absorbed via

2016 Evidently Cochrane

58. Topical NSAIDs for chronic musculoskeletal pain in adults. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Topical NSAIDs for chronic musculoskeletal pain in adults. Use of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to treat chronic musculoskeletal conditions has become widely accepted because they can provide pain relief without associated systemic adverse events. This review is an update of 'Topical NSAIDs for chronic musculoskeletal pain in adults', originally published in Issue 9, 2012.To review the evidence from randomised, double-blind, controlled trials on the efficacy and safety (...) of topically applied NSAIDs for chronic musculoskeletal pain in adults.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and our own in-house database; the date of the last search was February 2016. We also searched the references lists of included studies and reviews, and sought unpublished studies by asking personal contacts and searching online clinical trial registers and manufacturers' web sites.We included randomised, double-blind, active or inert carrier

2016 Cochrane

59. Pregabalin in Patients With Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Using an NSAID for Other Pain Conditions: A Double-Blind Crossover Study (Abstract)

Pregabalin in Patients With Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Using an NSAID for Other Pain Conditions: A Double-Blind Crossover Study To evaluate pregabalin's efficacy and safety versus placebo to reduce pain in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) using a concomitant nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug.In a randomized, double-masked, 14-week, 2-period, crossover study, patients with painful DPN using a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug for non-DPN-related pain received

2016 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

60. Randomised controlled trial: NSAIDs or paracetamol for short-term treatment of mild to moderate knee pain in early osteoarthritis: are they equivalent?

Randomised controlled trial: NSAIDs or paracetamol for short-term treatment of mild to moderate knee pain in early osteoarthritis: are they equivalent? NSAIDs or paracetamol for short-term treatment of mild to moderate knee pain in early osteoarthritis: are they equivalent? | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies (...) , please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here NSAIDs or paracetamol for short-term treatment of mild to moderate knee pain in early osteoarthritis

2016 Evidence-Based Medicine