Latest & greatest articles for nsaids

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Top results for nsaids

1. Acetaminophen vs. NSAIDs during COVID-19 pandemic

Acetaminophen vs. NSAIDs during COVID-19 pandemic Acetaminophen vs. NSAIDs during COVID-19 pandemic Independent Healthcare Evidence > > Acetaminophen vs. NSAIDs during COVID-19 pandemic , TREATING FEVER AND PAIN in the time of COVID-19 Many people are asking doctors for information about whether it is safe to use NSAID drugs now. Examples of this drug class include ibuprofen (generic, Advil, Motrin), naproxen (generic, Aleve), diclofenac (generic, Voltaren, Arthrotec), celecoxib (Celebrex (...) ), meloxicam (Mobicox) and many others. Feeling an increase in your body temperature can tell you if you are sick. And, fever is an important vital sign which can alert doctors and nurses about your clinical condition. However, it is not usually medically necessary to suppress fever. The science is unsettled about the relationship between COVID-19 and NSAIDs and there are contradictory viewpoints because we lack high quality evidence on which to base recommendations. Please check our for emerging evidence

2020 Therapeutics Letter

2. COVID-19 rapid evidence summary: Long-term use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for people with or at risk of COVID-19

COVID-19 rapid evidence summary: Long-term use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for people with or at risk of COVID-19 COVID-19 rapid evidence summary: Long-term use of non- steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for people with or at risk of COVID-19 Evidence summary Published: 21 May 2020 www.nice.org.uk/guidance/es25 pathways Key messages Key messages The content of this evidence review was up-to-date on 20 April 2020. See summaries of product characteristics (SPCs (...) ), British national formulary (BNF) or the MHRA or NICE websites for up-to-date information. In March 2020, the French Health Ministry issued advice to avoid using non-steroidal anti- inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to treat symptoms of COVID-19 because these medicines might aggravate the infection. In response to these concerns, NHS England issued a Central Alerting System (CAS) alert, in which the Medical Director, Professor Stephen Powis, gave interim advice that people who are currently on NSAIDs

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Advice

3. COVID-19 rapid evidence summary: acute use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for people with or at risk of COVID-19

COVID-19 rapid evidence summary: acute use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for people with or at risk of COVID-19 COVID-19 rapid evidence summary: acute use of non- steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for people with or at risk of COVID-19 Evidence summary Published: 14 April 2020 www.nice.org.uk/guidance/es23 pathways Key messages Key messages The content of this evidence review was up-to-date on 24 March 2020. See summaries of product characteristics (SPCs), British (...) national formulary (BNF) or the MHRA or NICE websites for up-to-date information. In March 2020, the French Health Ministry issued advice to avoid using non-steroidal anti- inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to treat symptoms of COVID-19 because these medicines might aggravate the infection. In response to these concerns, the MHRA issued a Central alerting system (CAS) alert in which the NHS England Medical Director, Professor Stephen Powis, advised using paracetamol in preference to ibuprofen in people

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Advice

4. Can NSAIDs be used in children when COVID-19 is suspected?

Can NSAIDs be used in children when COVID-19 is suspected? Can NSAIDs be used in children when COVID-19 is suspected?Can NSAIDs be used in children when COVID-19 is suspected? | Canadian Paediatric Society A home for paediatricians. A voice for children and youth. Current: Can NSAIDs be used in… Practice Point Can NSAIDs be used in children when COVID-19 is suspected? Posted: Mar 24 2020 The Canadian Paediatric Society gives permission to print single copies of this document from our website (...) ). Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is an aniline antipyretic which has antipyretic but not anti-inflammatory properties. Ibuprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that possesses both antipyretic and anti-inflammatory properties. Both Health Canada and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommend against the use of ibuprofen in children less than 6 months of age [ ] . A concern has been raised regarding the use of NSAIDs in suspected cases of COVID-19. This issue is based on the theoretical

2020 Canadian Paediatric Society

5. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy in patients with hypertension, cardiovascular, renal or gastrointestinal comorbidities: joint APAGE/APLAR/APSDE/APSH/APSN/PoA recommendations

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy in patients with hypertension, cardiovascular, renal or gastrointestinal comorbidities: joint APAGE/APLAR/APSDE/APSH/APSN/PoA recommendations Non-steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug (NSAID) Therapy in Patients With Hypertension, Cardiovascular, Renal or Gastrointestinal Comorbidities: Joint APAGE/APLAR/APSDE/APSH/APSN/PoA Recommendations - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set (...) to Collections Create a new collection Add to an existing collection Name your collection: Name must be less than 100 characters Choose a collection: Unable to load your collection due to an error Add Cancel Add to My Bibliography My Bibliography Unable to load your delegates due to an error Add Cancel Actions Cite Share Permalink Copy Page navigation Gut Actions 2020 Jan 14 [Online ahead of print] Non-steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug (NSAID) Therapy in Patients With Hypertension, Cardiovascular, Renal

2020 EvidenceUpdates

6. Does NSAID use increase the risk for progression of CKD?

Does NSAID use increase the risk for progression of CKD? Chiefs’ Inquiry Corner – 12/23/19 – Clinical Correlations Search Chiefs’ Inquiry Corner – 12/23/19 December 23, 2019 2 min read Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAIDs) drugs have a low, but real risk of acute kidney injury, exacerbating hypertension and contributing to electrolyte disturbances. However, the impact of NSAID use on progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) had previously been unclear. A systematic review and meta-analysis (...) of patients with moderate to severe CKD did not find an association between NSAID use and progression of CKD. However, a subgroup analysis of patients with “high dose NSAID use” (defined as the top quintile or decile of patients included in the respective study) did have a significant association with progression of CKD. As such, NSAIDs are now thought to have a cumulative dose effect on the risk of CKD progression, and an argument can be made for the cautious use of NSAIDs in patients with CKD

2020 Clinical Correlations

7. COVID-19: NSAIDs in Acute Respiratory Infection

COVID-19: NSAIDs in Acute Respiratory Infection NSAIDs in Acute Respiratory Infection - CEBM CEBM The Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine develops, promotes and disseminates better evidence for healthcare. Navigate this website NSAIDs in Acute Respiratory Infection Access Evidence Inventory Carl Heneghan, Jon Brassey Verdict: there is a need for caution when using NSAIDs in the context of acute respiratory infections (ARI). Pre-existing medications and conditions need to be taken account of when (...) deciding to prescribe NSAIDs for symptomatic ARI. The lowest effective dose should be prescribed for the shortest period of time.Parenteral use of NSAIDs during an ARI should be avoided. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used by patients with ARI or common cold for pain and fever relief. Their use needs to be balanced with the risks and benefits. Current research evidence in coronavirus is lacking and therefore evidence from acute respiratory infections have been used to inform

2020 Oxford COVID-19 Evidence Service

8. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with COVID-19

The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with COVID-19 The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with COVID-19 WHO Regional websites / / / / The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with COVID-19 The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with COVID-19 Scientific Brief 19 April 2020 Related © 2020

2020 WHO Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) Pandemic

9. Are Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) safe in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic?

Are Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) safe in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic? COVID-19 Scientific Advisory Group Rapid Response Report April 22, 2020 © 2020, Alberta Health Services, COVID-19 Scientific Advisory Group Key Research Topic: Use of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) in COVID-19 Patients 1. Should patients who are on prescribed NSAIDS as chronic therapy stop taking these drugs if they develop COVID-19? 2. Should NSAIDs be used for anti-pyretic therapy (...) or other indications in patients with COVID-19? Key Messages from the Evidence Summary • The evidence for this topic is gathered entirely from existing guidance and literature reviews. No primary studies were identified that support or refute the safety of NSAIDs in COVID-19 treatment. • Guidance from Canadian sources and the European Medicines Agency state that patients who take prescribed NSAIDs prior to developing COVID-19 should continue to take their medication. • Canadian, British, and American

2020 Covid-19 Ad hoc papers

10. Gliptins: joint pain and exposure to NSAIDs

Gliptins: joint pain and exposure to NSAIDs Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Gliptins: joint pain and exposure to NSAIDs'', 1 November 2019 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Gliptins: joint pain and exposure to NSAIDs Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight In the November issue of Prescrire International - Gliptins: joint pain and exposure (...) to NSAIDs FREE DOWNLOAD In the Adverse Effects section of the November issue, the results of a study by the independent French medical journal Prescrire, based on data from France's national health insurance system. Full text available for free download. Summary Joint and muscle pain are part of the adverse effect profile of gliptins. In France, Prescrire carried out a study, using data from the mandatory national health insurance system, showing that patients taking gliptins are more frequently exposed

2019 Prescrire

11. Acute gout: Oral steroids work as well as NSAIDs

Acute gout: Oral steroids work as well as NSAIDs Acute gout: Oral steroids work as well as NSAIDs Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics Acute gout: Oral steroids work as well as NSAIDs View/ Open Date 2008-10 Format Metadata Abstract Use a short course of oral steroids (prednisone 30-40mg/d for 5 days (...) ) for treatment of acute gout when nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are contraindicated. Steroids are also a reasonable choice as first-line treatment. Stength of recommendation: B: 2 good-quality, randomized controlled trials (RCTs). URI Part of Citation Journal of Family Practice, 57(10) 2008: 655-657. Rights OpenAccess. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License. Collections hosted by hosted by

2019 PURLS

12. Comparison of intravenous NSAIDs and trigger point injection for low back pain in ED: A prospective randomized study (Abstract)

Comparison of intravenous NSAIDs and trigger point injection for low back pain in ED: A prospective randomized study Low back pain (LBP) is a common complaint originating from muscles Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is mainly associated with trigger points (TrP) in the muscle tissue. We compared the intravenously administered non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and trigger point injection (TPI) in the treatment of LBP patients admitted to the emergency department due to pain caused (...) by TrPs.After randomization, NSAID was administered intravenously in group 1 and TPIs were performed as specified by Travell and Simons in group 2. The TrPs were identified with the anamnesis and physical examination Demographic characteristics and vital signs of the patients were recorded. Pain scores were measured with the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) at admission; and in minutes 5, 10, 15, 30, and 60.There were 32 patients in group 1 and 22 patients in group 2. The demographics, vital signs, and pain

2019 EvidenceUpdates

13. Acute gout: Oral steroids work as well as NSAIDs

Acute gout: Oral steroids work as well as NSAIDs Acute gout: Oral steroids work as well as NSAIDs Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics Acute gout: Oral steroids work as well as NSAIDs View/ Open Date 2008-10 Format Metadata Abstract Use a short course of oral steroids (prednisone 30-40mg/d for 5 days (...) ) for treatment of acute gout when nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are contraindicated. Steroids are also a reasonable choice as first-line treatment. Stength of recommendation: B: 2 good-quality, randomized controlled trials (RCTs). URI Part of Citation Journal of Family Practice, 57(10) 2008: 655-657. Rights OpenAccess. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License. Collections hosted by hosted by

2019 PURLS

14. Omega-3 PUFA vs. NSAIDs for Preventing Cardiac Inflammation Full Text available with Trip Pro

Omega-3 PUFA vs. NSAIDs for Preventing Cardiac Inflammation 30406113 2018 11 14 2297-055X 5 2018 Frontiers in cardiovascular medicine Front Cardiovasc Med Omega-3 PUFA vs. NSAIDs for Preventing Cardiac Inflammation. 146 10.3389/fcvm.2018.00146 Ye Jiayu J Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences (IKBSAS), Department of Biology, University of University of British Columbia, Kelowna, BC, Canada. Ghosh Sanjoy S Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences (IKBSAS), Department of Biology (...) , University of University of British Columbia, Kelowna, BC, Canada. eng Journal Article 2018 10 23 Switzerland Front Cardiovasc Med 101653388 2297-055X EPA NSAIDs aspirin docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) inflammation 2018 04 26 2018 10 01 2018 11 9 6 0 2018 11 9 6 0 2018 11 9 6 1 epublish 30406113 10.3389/fcvm.2018.00146 PMC6205954 J Am Coll Nutr. 2002 Dec;21(6):495-505 12480795 J Nutr. 2002 Dec;132(12):3566-76 12468590 N Engl J Med. 1991 Jul 11;325(2):87-91 2052056 J Assoc Physicians India. 2002 Aug;50:1028-33

2018 Frontiers in cardiovascular medicine

15. NSAIDs

NSAIDs Top results for nsaids - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Find evidence fast ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4) Loading (...) history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for nsaids The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

16. NSAIDs: Are They All the Same?

NSAIDs: Are They All the Same? NSAIDs: Are They All the Same? – Clinical Correlations Search NSAIDs: Are They All the Same? February 1, 2018 5 min read By Vishal Shah, MD Peer Reviewed Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a heterogenous group of non-opioid analgesics and anti-inflammatory agents. Their use is ubiquitous, from treating a simple tension headache to a sprained ankle. NSAIDs are available over the counter and in prescription form. NSAID use in the United States (...) of opioids and addictive nature of these agents, . 3 NSAIDs inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX), an enzyme involved in the production of prostaglandins. Although COX-1 is present in most tissues, it plays a crucial role in gastric cytoprotection and platelet aggregation. COX-2 is primarily involved in the inflammatory response, with additional role in vasoprotection and regulation of renal blood flow. Based on their COX-2 selectivity, NSAIDs can be grouped into 3 categories: Non-selective (ibuprofen, naproxen

2018 Clinical Correlations

17. Perioperative Use of NSAIDs: Safety and Guidelines

Perioperative Use of NSAIDs: Safety and Guidelines Perioperative Use of NSAIDs: Safety and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Perioperative Use of NSAIDs: Safety and Guidelines Perioperative Use of NSAIDs: Safety and Guidelines Last updated: April 5, 2018 Project Number: RB1205-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary of Abstracts Result type: Report Question What is the clinical evidence regarding the safety and harms of the perioperative use of nonsteroidal (...) anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)? What are the evidence-based guidelines regarding the perioperative use of NSAIDs? Key Message Eight systematic reviews (six with meta-analyses), six randomized controlled trials, 21 non-randomized studies, and three evidence-based guidelines were identified regarding the perioperative use of NSAIDs. Files Rapid Response Summary of Abstracts Published : April 5, 2018 Related Content Follow us: © 2019 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health Get our

2018 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

18. Vonoprazan prevents ulcer recurrence during long-term NSAID therapy: randomised, lansoprazole-controlled non-inferiority and single-blind extension study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Vonoprazan prevents ulcer recurrence during long-term NSAID therapy: randomised, lansoprazole-controlled non-inferiority and single-blind extension study To assess the non-inferiority of vonoprazan to lansoprazole for secondary prevention of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced peptic ulcer (PU) and the safety of vonoprazan during extended use.A phase 3, 24-week, multicenter, randomised, double-blind (DB), active-controlled study, followed by a phase 3, ≥28 week, multicenter (...) , single-blind, parallel-group extension study (EXT) in outpatients (n=642) receiving long-term NSAID therapy who are at risk of PU recurrence. The patients received vonoprazan (10 mg or 20 mg) or lansoprazole 15 mg once daily. For DB, non-inferiority of the proportion of patients with recurrent PU within 24 weeks was analysed by Farrington and Manning test (significance level 2.5%, non-inferiority margin 8.3%; primary endpoint), recurrent PU within 12 weeks, bleeding and time-to-event of PU (secondary

2017 EvidenceUpdates

19. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for chronic non-cancer pain in children and adolescents. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for chronic non-cancer pain in children and adolescents. Pain is a common feature of childhood and adolescence around the world, and for many young people, that pain is chronic. The World Health Organization guidelines for pharmacological treatments for children's persisting pain acknowledge that pain in children is a major public health concern of high significance in most parts of the world. While in the past pain was largely dismissed (...) ) is a major health concern. Chronic pain (that is pain lasting three months or longer) can arise in the paediatric population in a variety of pathophysiological classifications (nociceptive, neuropathic, or idiopathic) from genetic conditions, nerve damage pain, chronic musculoskeletal pain, and chronic abdominal pain, as well as for other unknown reasons.Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to treat pain, reduce fever, and for their anti-inflammation properties. They are commonly used

2017 Cochrane

20. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for cancer-related pain in children and adolescents. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for cancer-related pain in children and adolescents. Pain is a common feature of childhood and adolescence around the world, and for many young people, that pain is chronic. The World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for pharmacological treatments for persisting pain in children acknowledge that pain in children is a major public health concern of high significance in most parts of the world. Views on children's pain have changed over time (...) treatments, or mucositis. However, this review focused on pain caused directly by the tumour itself such as nerve infiltration, external nerve compression, and other inflammatory events.Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to treat pain, reduce fever, and for their anti-inflammatory properties. They are commonly used within paediatric pain management. NSAIDs are currently licensed for use in western countries, however not approved for infants aged under three months. Primary adverse

2017 Cochrane