Latest & greatest articles for myocardial infarction

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Top results for myocardial infarction

81. [Standards regarding reperfusion treatments for ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI) in Quebec (Review)]

[Standards regarding reperfusion treatments for ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI) in Quebec (Review)] Normes relatives aux traitements de reperfusion de l'infarctus aigu du myocarde avec élévation du segment ST (IAMEST) au Québec [Standards regarding reperfusion treatments for ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI) in Quebec (Review)] Normes relatives aux traitements de reperfusion de l'infarctus aigu du myocarde avec élévation du segment ST (IAMEST) au (...) Québec [Standards regarding reperfusion treatments for ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI) in Quebec (Review)] Azzi L, Boothroyd L, Bogaty P, Lambert L Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Azzi L, Boothroyd L, Bogaty P, Lambert L. Normes relatives aux traitements de reperfusion de l'infarctus aigu du myocarde

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2017

82. Assessing and Refining Myocardial Infarction Risk Estimation among Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Centers for AIDS Research Network of Integrated Clinical Systems (CNICS)

Assessing and Refining Myocardial Infarction Risk Estimation among Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Centers for AIDS Research Network of Integrated Clinical Systems (CNICS) 28002550 2018 11 13 2380-6591 2 2 2017 Feb 01 JAMA cardiology JAMA Cardiol Assessing and Refining Myocardial Infarction Risk Estimation Among Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus: A Study by the Centers for AIDS Research Network of Integrated Clinical Systems. 155-162 10.1001/jamacardio.2016.4494 Persons (...) with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that is treated with antiretroviral therapy have improved longevity but face an elevated risk of myocardial infarction (MI) due to common MI risk factors and HIV-specific factors. Despite these elevated MI rates, optimal methods to predict MI risks for HIV-infected persons remain unclear. To determine the extent to which existing and de novo estimation tools predict MI in a multicenter HIV cohort with rigorous MI adjudication. We evaluated the performance of standard of care and 2 new

JAMA cardiology2017 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

84. Effect of potentially modifiable risk factors associated with myocardial infarction in 52 countries (the INTERHEART study): case-control study.

Effect of potentially modifiable risk factors associated with myocardial infarction in 52 countries (the INTERHEART study): case-control study. BACKGROUND: Although more than 80% of the global burden of cardiovascular disease occurs in low-income and middle-income countries, knowledge of the importance of risk factors is largely derived from developed countries. Therefore, the effect of such factors on risk of coronary heart disease in most regions of the world is unknown. METHODS: We (...) established a standardised case-control study of acute myocardial infarction in 52 countries, representing every inhabited continent. 15152 cases and 14820 controls were enrolled. The relation of smoking, history of hypertension or diabetes, waist/hip ratio, dietary patterns, physical activity, consumption of alcohol, blood apolipoproteins (Apo), and psychosocial factors to myocardial infarction are reported here. Odds ratios and their 99% CIs for the association of risk factors to myocardial infarction

Lancet2017

85. Association of psychosocial risk factors with risk of acute myocardial infarction in 11119 cases and 13648 controls from 52 countries (the INTERHEART study): case-control study.

Association of psychosocial risk factors with risk of acute myocardial infarction in 11119 cases and 13648 controls from 52 countries (the INTERHEART study): case-control study. BACKGROUND: Psychosocial factors have been reported to be independently associated with coronary heart disease. However, previous studies have been in mainly North American or European populations. The aim of the present analysis was to investigate the relation of psychosocial factors to risk of myocardial infarction (...) in 24767 people from 52 countries. METHODS: We used a case-control design with 11119 patients with a first myocardial infarction and 13648 age-matched (up to 5 years older or younger) and sex-matched controls from 262 centres in Asia, Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Australia, and North and South America. Data for demographic factors, education, income, and cardiovascular risk factors were obtained by standardised approaches. Psychosocial stress was assessed by four simple questions about stress

Lancet2017

86. Risk of acute myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death in patients treated with cyclo-oxygenase 2 selective and non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: nested case-control study.

Risk of acute myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death in patients treated with cyclo-oxygenase 2 selective and non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: nested case-control study. BACKGROUND: Controversy has surrounded the question about whether high-dose rofecoxib increases or naproxen decreases the risk of serious coronary heart disease. We sought to establish if risk was enhanced with rofecoxib at either high or standard doses compared with remote non-steroidal anti (...) -inflammatory drug (NSAID) use or celecoxib use, because celecoxib was the most common alternative to rofecoxib. METHODS: We used data from Kaiser Permanente in California to assemble a cohort of all patients age 18-84 years treated with a NSAID between Jan 1, 1999, and Dec 31, 2001, within which we did a nested case-control study. Cases of serious coronary heart disease (acute myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death) were risk-set matched with four controls for age, sex, and health plan region

Lancet2017

87. Prognostic value of a normal or nonspecific initial electrocardiogram in acute myocardial infarction.

Prognostic value of a normal or nonspecific initial electrocardiogram in acute myocardial infarction. CONTEXT: Although previous studies have suggested that normal and nonspecific initial electrocardiograms (ECGs) are associated with a favorable prognosis for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), their independent predictive value for mortality has not been examined. OBJECTIVE: To compare in-hospital mortality among patients with AMI who have normal or nonspecific initial ECGs (...) with that of patients who have diagnostic ECGs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS: Multihospital observational study in which 391 208 patients with AMI met the study criteria between June 1994 and June 2000 and had ECGs that were normal (n = 30 759), nonspecific (n = 137 574), or diagnostic (n = 222 875; defined as ST-segment elevation or depression and/or left bundle-branch block). A logistic regression model was constructed using a propensity score for ECG findings and data on demographics, medical history

JAMA2017

88. Clinical policy: emergency department management of patients needing reperfusion therapy for acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

Clinical policy: emergency department management of patients needing reperfusion therapy for acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Clinical policy: emergency department management of patients needing reperfusion therapy for acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. | National Guideline Clearinghouse success fail May JUN 09 2017 2018 2019 19 May 2018 - 12 Jul 2018 COLLECTED BY Organization: Formed in 2009, the Archive Team (not to be confused with the archive.org Archive (...) NGC:011295 2017 Nov NEATS Assessment Clinical policy: emergency department management of patients needing reperfusion therapy for acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Promes SB, Glauser JM, Smith MD, Torbati SS, Brown MD, American College of Emergency Physicians. Clinical policy: emergency department management of patients needing reperfusion therapy for acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Ann Emerg Med. 2017 Nov;70(5):724-39. [28 references] This is the current release

National Guideline Clearinghouse (partial archive)2017

89. Routine invasive strategies compared with conservative strategies do not lower the all-cause mortality in patients with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction and unstable angina

Routine invasive strategies compared with conservative strategies do not lower the all-cause mortality in patients with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction and unstable angina Routine invasive strategies compared with conservative strategies do not lower the all-cause mortality in patients with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction and unstable angina | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your (...) compared with conservative strategies do not lower the all-cause mortality in patients with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction and unstable angina Article Text Commentary Emergency care Routine invasive strategies compared with conservative strategies do not lower the all-cause mortality in patients with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction and unstable angina Udho Thadani Statistics from Altmetric.com Commentary on: Fanning JP, Nyong J, Scott IA, et al . Routine invasive strategies versus

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2017

90. 2017 AHA/ACC Clinical Performance and Quality Measures for Adults With ST-Elevation and Non?ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Performance Measures

2017 AHA/ACC Clinical Performance and Quality Measures for Adults With ST-Elevation and Non?ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Performance Measures 2017 AHA/ACC Clinical Performance and Quality Measures for Adults With ST-Elevation and Non–ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Performance Measures | Circulation (...) : Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes Search for this keyword Search Search for this keyword Search Header Publisher Menu AHA/ACC Performance Measures 2017 AHA/ACC Clinical Performance and Quality Measures for Adults With ST-Elevation and Non–ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Performance Measures Hani Jneid , Daniel Addison , Deepak L. Bhatt , Gregg C. Fonarow , Sana Gokak , Kathleen L. Grady , Lee A. Green , Paul

American Heart Association2017

91. Emergency Department Management of Patients Needing Reperfusion Therapy for Acute ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

Emergency Department Management of Patients Needing Reperfusion Therapy for Acute ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

American College of Emergency Physicians2017

92. Brilique (ticagrelor) - myocardial infarction

Brilique (ticagrelor) - myocardial infarction Brilique® (ticagrelor) × Insert searchphrase to search the website Insert searchphrase to search the website > > > Brilique® (ticagrelor) Conclusion The indication for Brilique (ticagrelor), reviewed by IRF in 2011 (1), has been extended to cover also after-treatment of myocardial infarction (MI) beyond 1 year with a lower dose of 60 mg twice daily co-administered with low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) for up to three years. The approval is based (...) on the PEGASUS-TIMI 54 study, which included high-risk patients with a history of MI (plus at least one of the following risk factors: age ≥ 65 years, diabetes mellitus requiring medication, more than one prior MI, multivessel coronary artery disease or renal impairment (eGFR < 60 mL/min)) (2). Treatment with ticagrelor with ASA, as compared with placebo with ASA, was more effective at preventing the composite efficacy endpoint of MI, stroke or cardiovascular death. However, there was a higher rate

Danish Pharmacotherapy Reviews2017

93. Cross-sectional study: Increased physical activity in women following myocardial infarction improves health-related quality of life

Cross-sectional study: Increased physical activity in women following myocardial infarction improves health-related quality of life Increased physical activity in women following myocardial infarction improves health-related quality of life | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name (...) or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Increased physical activity in women following myocardial infarction improves health-related quality of life Article Text Adult nursing Cross-sectional study Increased physical activity in women following myocardial infarction improves health-related quality of life Donna

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2017

96. Beta blockers during acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)

Beta blockers during acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)

DynaMed Plus2017

98. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)

Antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)

DynaMed Plus2017

100. ACE inhibitors during acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)

ACE inhibitors during acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)

DynaMed Plus2017