Latest & greatest articles for myocardial infarction

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Top results for myocardial infarction

1. Effect of Low-Dose Intracoronary Alteplase During Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention on Microvascular Obstruction in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

Effect of Low-Dose Intracoronary Alteplase During Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention on Microvascular Obstruction in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Importance: Microvascular obstruction commonly affects patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and is associated with adverse outcomes. Objective: To determine whether a therapeutic strategy involving low-dose intracoronary fibrinolytic therapy with alteplase infused (...) early after coronary reperfusion will reduce microvascular obstruction. Design, Setting, and Participants: Between March 17, 2016, and December 21, 2017, 440 patients presenting at 11 hospitals in the United Kingdom within 6 hours of STEMI due to a proximal-mid-vessel occlusion of a major coronary artery were randomized in a 1:1:1 dose-ranging trial design. Patient follow-up to 3 months was completed on April 12, 2018. Interventions: Participants were randomly assigned to treatment with placebo (n

JAMA2019

2. Effect of Medication Co-payment Vouchers on P2Y12 Inhibitor Use and Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events Among Patients With Myocardial Infarction: The ARTEMIS Randomized Clinical Trial.

Effect of Medication Co-payment Vouchers on P2Y12 Inhibitor Use and Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events Among Patients With Myocardial Infarction: The ARTEMIS Randomized Clinical Trial. Importance: Despite guideline recommendations, many patients discontinue P2Y12 inhibitor therapy earlier than the recommended 1 year after myocardial infarction (MI), and higher-potency P2Y12 inhibitors are underutilized. Cost is frequently cited as an explanation for both of these observations. Objective (...) : To determine whether removing co-payment barriers increases P2Y12 inhibitor persistence and lowers risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Design, Setting, and Participants: Cluster randomized clinical trial among 301 hospitals enrolling adult patients with acute MI (June 5, 2015, through September 30, 2016); patients were followed up for 1 year after discharge (final date of follow-up was October 23, 2017), with blinded adjudication of MACE; choice of P2Y12 inhibitor was per clinician

JAMA2019

3. Association of the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program With Mortality Among Medicare Beneficiaries Hospitalized for Heart Failure, Acute Myocardial Infarction, and Pneumonia.

Association of the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program With Mortality Among Medicare Beneficiaries Hospitalized for Heart Failure, Acute Myocardial Infarction, and Pneumonia. Importance: The Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP) has been associated with a reduction in readmission rates for heart failure (HF), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and pneumonia. It is unclear whether the HRRP has been associated with change in patient mortality. Objective: To determine whether the HRRP (...) was associated with a change in patient mortality. Design, Setting, and Participants: Retrospective cohort study of hospitalizations for HF, AMI, and pneumonia among Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries aged at least 65 years across 4 periods from April 1, 2005, to March 31, 2015. Period 1 and period 2 occurred before the HRRP to establish baseline trends (April 2005-September 2007 and October 2007-March 2010). Period 3 and period 4 were after HRRP announcement (April 2010 to September 2012) and HRRP

JAMA2018

4. Christmas, national holidays, sport events, and time factors as triggers of acute myocardial infarction: SWEDEHEART observational study 1998-2013.

Christmas, national holidays, sport events, and time factors as triggers of acute myocardial infarction: SWEDEHEART observational study 1998-2013. OBJECTIVES: To study circadian rhythm aspects, national holidays, and major sports events as triggers of myocardial infarction. DESIGN: Retrospective observational study using the nationwide coronary care unit registry, SWEDEHEART. SETTING: Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: 283 014 cases of myocardial infarction reported to SWEDEHEART between 1998 and 2013 (...) . Symptom onset date was documented for all cases, and time to the nearest minute for 88%. INTERVENTIONS: Myocardial infarctions with symptom onset on Christmas/New Year, Easter, and Midsummer holiday were identified. Similarly, myocardial infarctions that occurred during a FIFA World Cup, UEFA European Championship, and winter and summer Olympic Games were identified. The two weeks before and after a holiday were set as a control period, and for sports events the control period was set to the same time

BMJ2018

5. Non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction

Non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction Non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction Last reviewed: November 2018 Last updated: December 2018 Summary Part of the acute coronary syndrome spectrum. Usually caused by a partial or near-complete occlusion of a coronary artery resulting in compromised blood flow to myocardium with subsequent (...) myocardial injury or infarction as demonstrated by elevation in troponin. There are differences in typical presentation between the sexes. Male patients typically present with chest pressure/discomfort lasting at least several minutes, at times accompanied by sweating, dyspnoea, nausea, and/or anxiety. Women present more commonly with middle/upper back pain or dyspnoea and similar associated symptoms. Symptoms are indistinguishable from those of unstable angina. However, non-ST-elevation

BMJ Best Practice2018

6. Meta-analysis Comparing Culprit Vessel Only Versus Multivessel Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction and Cardiogenic Shock

Meta-analysis Comparing Culprit Vessel Only Versus Multivessel Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction and Cardiogenic Shock 30420183 2018 11 13 1879-1913 2018 Oct 26 The American journal of cardiology Am. J. Cardiol. Meta-analysis Comparing Culprit Vessel Only Versus Multivessel Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction and Cardiogenic Shock. S0002-9149(18)31966-0 10.1016/j.amjcard.2018.09.039 Cardiogenic shock (CS (...) ) after a myocardial infarction continues to be associated with high mortality. Whether percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of noninfarct coronary arteries (multivessel intervention [MVI]) improves outcomes in CS after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains controversial. MEDLINE, Cochrane CENTRAL, and Scopus databases were searched for original studies comparing MVI with culprit-vessel intervention (CVI) in AMI patients with multivessel disease and CS. Risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence

EvidenceUpdates2018

7. Relation of CHA2DS2VASC Score With Hemorrhagic Stroke and Mortality in Patients Undergoing Fibrinolytic Therapy for ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction

Relation of CHA2DS2VASC Score With Hemorrhagic Stroke and Mortality in Patients Undergoing Fibrinolytic Therapy for ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction 30415795 2018 11 12 1879-1913 2018 Oct 18 The American journal of cardiology Am. J. Cardiol. Relation of CHA 2 DS 2 VASC Score With Hemorrhagic Stroke and Mortality in Patients Undergoing Fibrinolytic Therapy for ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction. S0002-9149(18)31955-6 10.1016/j.amjcard.2018.10.003 Hemorrhagic stroke (HS) is a feared (...) complication of Fibrinolytic therapy (FT). Risk assessment scores may help in risk stratification to reduce this complication. Patients (admissions) ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who received systemic thrombolysis were extracted from Nationwide Inpatient Sample database and stratified and compared based on CHA 2 DS 2 VASC score 0 to 3, 4 to 6, and 7 to 9 as low, intermediate and high risk, respectively. The primary outcomes of interest were HS

EvidenceUpdates2018

8. Sex differences in risk factors for myocardial infarction: cohort study of UK Biobank participants.

Sex differences in risk factors for myocardial infarction: cohort study of UK Biobank participants. OBJECTIVES: To investigate sex differences in risk factors for incident myocardial infarction (MI) and whether they vary with age. DESIGN: Prospective population based study. SETTING: UK Biobank. PARTICIPANTS: 471 998 participants (56% women; mean age 56.2) with no history of cardiovascular disease. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Incident (fatal and non-fatal) MI. RESULTS: 5081 participants (1463 (28.8 (...) %) of whom were women) had MI over seven years' mean follow-up, resulting in an incidence per 10 000 person years of 7.76 (95% confidence interval 7.37 to 8.16) for women and 24.35 (23.57 to 25.16) for men. Higher blood pressure indices, smoking intensity, body mass index, and the presence of diabetes were associated with an increased risk of MI in men and women, but associations were attenuated with age. In women, systolic blood pressure and hypertension, smoking status and intensity, and diabetes were

BMJ2018

9. Can a Negative High-Sensitivity Troponin Result Rapidly Rule Out Acute Myocardial Infarction?

Can a Negative High-Sensitivity Troponin Result Rapidly Rule Out Acute Myocardial Infarction? Annals of Emergency Medicine Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Share this page Copyright © 2018 Inc. All rights reserved. | | | | | | The content on this site is intended for health professionals. We use cookies to help provide and enhance our service and tailor content and ads. By continuing you agree to the . Advertisements on this site do not constitute

Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots2018

10. In Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction and No Hypoxemia, Does Oxygen Therapy Improve Outcomes Compared With No Supplemental Oxygen?

In Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction and No Hypoxemia, Does Oxygen Therapy Improve Outcomes Compared With No Supplemental Oxygen? Annals of Emergency Medicine Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Share this page Copyright © 2018 Inc. All rights reserved. | | | | | | The content on this site is intended for health professionals. We use cookies to help provide and enhance our service and tailor content and ads. By continuing you agree

Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots2018

11. In Patients With ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction, Which Fibrinolytic Agent Is the Safest and Most Effective?

In Patients With ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction, Which Fibrinolytic Agent Is the Safest and Most Effective? Annals of Emergency Medicine Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Share this page Copyright © 2018 Inc. All rights reserved. | | | | | | The content on this site is intended for health professionals. We use cookies to help provide and enhance our service and tailor content and ads. By continuing you agree to the . Advertisements on this site

Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots2018

12. Evolocumab (Repatha) - In adults with established atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (myocardial infarction, stroke or peripheral arterial disease)

Evolocumab (Repatha) - In adults with established atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (myocardial infarction, stroke or peripheral arterial disease) Published 12 November 2018 Statement of advice SMC2133 evolocumab 140mg solution for injection in pre-filled syringe / 140mg solution for injection in pre-filled pen / 420mg solution of injection in cartridge (Repatha®) Amgen Ltd 5 October 2018 ADVICE: in the absence of a submission from the holder of the marketing authorisation evolocumab (...) (Repatha®) is not recommended for use within NHSScotland. Indication under review: In adults with established atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (myocardial infarction, stroke or peripheral arterial disease) to reduce cardiovascular risk by lowering LDL-C levels, as an adjunct to correction of other risk factors: ? in combination with the maximum tolerated dose of a statin with or without other lipid- lowering therapies or, ? alone or in combination with other lipid-lowering therapies in patients

Scottish Medicines Consortium2018

13. Timing of revascularization in patients with transient ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: a randomized clinical trial

Timing of revascularization in patients with transient ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: a randomized clinical trial 30371767 2018 10 29 1522-9645 2018 Oct 26 European heart journal Eur. Heart J. Timing of revascularization in patients with transient ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: a randomized clinical trial. 10.1093/eurheartj/ehy651 Patients with acute coronary syndrome who present initially with ST-elevation on the electrocardiogram but, subsequently, show complete (...) normalization of the ST-segment and relief of symptoms before reperfusion therapy are referred to as transient ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and pose a therapeutic challenge. It is unclear what the optimal timing of revascularization is for these patients and whether they should be treated with a STEMI-like or a non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI)-like invasive approach. The aim of the study is to determine the effect of an immediate vs. a delayed invasive strategy

EvidenceUpdates2018

14. Six months versus 12 months dual antiplatelet therapy after drug-eluting stent implantation in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (DAPT-STEMI): randomised, multicentre, non-inferiority trial.

Six months versus 12 months dual antiplatelet therapy after drug-eluting stent implantation in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (DAPT-STEMI): randomised, multicentre, non-inferiority trial. OBJECTIVE: To show that limiting dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) to six months in patients with event-free ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) results in a non-inferior clinical outcome versus DAPT for 12 months. DESIGN: Prospective, randomised, multicentre, non-inferiority trial. SETTING: Patients (...) with STEMI treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and second generation zotarolimus-eluting stent. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with STEMI aged 18 to 85 that underwent a primary PCI with the implantation of second generation drug-eluting stents were enrolled in the trial. Patients that were event-free at six months after primary PCI were randomised at this time point. INTERVENTIONS: Patients that were taking DAPT and were event-free at six months were randomised 1:1 to single

BMJ2018 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

15. Meta-Analysis Comparing Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Versus Pharmacoinvasive Therapy in Transfer Patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

Meta-Analysis Comparing Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Versus Pharmacoinvasive Therapy in Transfer Patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction 30205885 2018 09 12 1879-1913 122 4 2018 Aug 15 The American journal of cardiology Am. J. Cardiol. Meta-Analysis Comparing Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Versus Pharmacoinvasive Therapy in Transfer Patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction. 542-547 S0002-9149(18)31058-0 10.1016/j.amjcard.2018.04.057 ST-elevation (...) myocardial infarction patients presenting at non-percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)-capable hospitals often need to be transferred for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). This increases time to revascularization, leading to increased risk of in-hospital mortality. With recent focus on total ischemic time rather than door-to-balloon time as the principal determinant of outcomes in ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients, pharmacoinvasive therapy (PIT) has gained attention as a possible

EvidenceUpdates2018

16. Combining High Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin I and Cardiac Troponin T in the Early Diagnosis of Acute Myocardial Infarction

Combining High Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin I and Cardiac Troponin T in the Early Diagnosis of Acute Myocardial Infarction 29691270 2018 04 25 1524-4539 2018 Apr 24 Circulation Circulation Combining High Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin I and Cardiac Troponin T in the Early Diagnosis of Acute Myocardial Infarction. CIRCULATIONAHA.117.032003 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.117.032003 Background -Combining two signals of cardiomyocyte injury, cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and T (cTnT), might overcome some (...) individual pathophysiological and analytical limitations and thereby increase diagnostic accuracy for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with a single blood draw. We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of combinations of high sensitivity (hs) cTnI and hs-cTnT for the early diagnosis of AMI. Methods -The diagnostic performance of combining hs-cTnI (Architect, Abbott) and hs-cTnT (Elecsys, Roche) concentrations (sum, product, ratio and a combination algorithm) obtained at the time of presentation

EvidenceUpdates2018

17. Impact of age on the performance of the ESC 0/1h-algorithms for early diagnosis of myocardial infarction

Impact of age on the performance of the ESC 0/1h-algorithms for early diagnosis of myocardial infarction 30169752 2018 08 31 1522-9645 2018 Aug 29 European heart journal Eur. Heart J. Impact of age on the performance of the ESC 0/1h-algorithms for early diagnosis of myocardial infarction. 10.1093/eurheartj/ehy514 We aimed to evaluate the impact of age on the performance of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) 0/1h-algorithms and to derive and externally validate alternative cut-offs (...) specific to older patients. We prospectively enrolled patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with symptoms suggestive of acute myocardial infarction in three large diagnostic studies. Final diagnoses were adjudicated by two independent cardiologists. High-sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn) T and I concentrations were measured at presentation and after 1 h. Patients were stratified according to age [<55 years (young), ≥55 to <70 years (middle-age), ≥70 years (old)]. Rule-out safety

EvidenceUpdates2018

18. Wearable Cardioverter-Defibrillator after Myocardial Infarction.

Wearable Cardioverter-Defibrillator after Myocardial Infarction. BACKGROUND: Despite the high rate of sudden death after myocardial infarction among patients with a low ejection fraction, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators are contraindicated until 40 to 90 days after myocardial infarction. Whether a wearable cardioverter-defibrillator would reduce the incidence of sudden death during this high-risk period is unclear. METHODS: We randomly assigned (in a 2:1 ratio) patients with acute (...) myocardial infarction and an ejection fraction of 35% or less to receive a wearable cardioverter-defibrillator plus guideline-directed therapy (the device group) or to receive only guideline-directed therapy (the control group). The primary outcome was the composite of sudden death or death from ventricular tachyarrhythmia at 90 days (arrhythmic death). Secondary outcomes included death from any cause and nonarrhythmic death. RESULTS: Of 2302 participants, 1524 were randomly assigned to the device group and 778

NEJM2018

19. ST-elevation myocardial infarction

ST-elevation myocardial infarction ST-elevation myocardial infarction - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  ST-elevation myocardial infarction Last reviewed: August 2018 Last updated: September 2018 Summary Presents with central chest pain that is classically heavy in nature, like a sensation of pressure or squeezing. Examination is variable, and findings range from normal to a critically unwell patient (...) in cardiogenic shock. ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is suspected when a patient presents with persistent ST-segment elevation in 2 or more anatomically contiguous ECG leads in the context of a consistent clinical history. Creatine kinase-MB and cardiac-specific troponins confirm diagnosis. Treatment should, however, be started immediately in patients with a typical history and ECG changes, without waiting for laboratory results. Immediate and prompt revascularisation can prevent or decrease

BMJ Best Practice2018

20. Fourth Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction

Fourth Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Fourth universal definition of myocardial infarction (2018) | European Heart Journal | Oxford Academic Search Account Menu Menu Navbar Search Filter Mobile Microsite Search Term Close search filter search input Article Navigation Close mobile search navigation (...) Article navigation Article Contents Article Navigation Fourth universal definition of myocardial infarction (2018) Kristian Thygesen Corresponding authors. Kristian Thygesen, Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Palle Juul-Jensens Boulevard, DK-8200 Aarhus N, Denmark. Tel: +45 78452262, Fax: +45 78452260, Email: ; . Search for other works by this author on: Joseph S Alpert Joseph S. Alpert, Department of Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine, 1501 N. Campbell Ave., P.O

European Society of Cardiology2018