Latest & greatest articles for morphine

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Top results for morphine

101. Risks and side-effects of intrathecal morphine combined with spinal anaesthesia: a meta-analysis

Risks and side-effects of intrathecal morphine combined with spinal anaesthesia: a meta-analysis Risks and side-effects of intrathecal morphine combined with spinal anaesthesia: a meta-analysis Risks and side-effects of intrathecal morphine combined with spinal anaesthesia: a meta-analysis Gehling M, Tryba M CRD summary This review found the use of intrathecal morphine in combination with spinal anaesthesia for post-operative analgesia was associated with an increase in nausea, vomiting (...) and pruritus. The authors' conclusions reflected the evidence presented but some methodological weaknesses mean that the reliability of these conclusions is unclear. Authors' objectives To assess the frequency of side-effects in patients receiving intrathecal morphine in combination with spinal anaesthesia. Searching MEDLINE was searched from inception to 2007; search terms were reported. Reference lists of retrieved articles were also searched for additional studies. It was unclear if any language

2009 DARE.

102. Serotonin receptor antagonists for the prevention and treatment of pruritus, nausea, and vomiting in women undergoing cesarean delivery with intrathecal morphine: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Serotonin receptor antagonists for the prevention and treatment of pruritus, nausea, and vomiting in women undergoing cesarean delivery with intrathecal morphine: a systematic review and meta-analysis Serotonin receptor antagonists for the prevention and treatment of pruritus, nausea, and vomiting in women undergoing cesarean delivery with intrathecal morphine: a systematic review and meta-analysis Serotonin receptor antagonists for the prevention and treatment of pruritus, nausea, and vomiting (...) in women undergoing cesarean delivery with intrathecal morphine: a systematic review and meta-analysis George RB, Allen TK, Habib AS CRD summary This review found that prophylactic serotonin (5-HT 3 ) receptor antagonists did not reduce pruritus incidence, but significantly reduced severity and need for pruritus treatment, postoperative nausea and vomiting and need for antiemetic therapy, and effectively treated established pruritus, in women who received intrathecal morphine for caesarean delivery

2009 DARE.

103. Benefit and risk of intrathecal morphine without local anaesthetic in patients undergoing major surgery: meta-analysis of randomized trials

Benefit and risk of intrathecal morphine without local anaesthetic in patients undergoing major surgery: meta-analysis of randomized trials Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2009 DARE.

104. The side effects of morphine and hydromorphone patient-controlled analgesia (PubMed)

The side effects of morphine and hydromorphone patient-controlled analgesia Despite "clinical lore" among health care providers that treatment with hydromorphone results in improved pain control and fewer adverse side effects, morphine continues to be the first-line medication for postoperative patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). In this study, we compared the efficacy and side-effect profiles of morphine and hydromorphone at concentrations producing equivalent drug effect measured by pain (...) score and miosis.We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind trial of 50 general and gynecological surgery patients. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive either morphine (1 mg/mL) or hydromorphone (0.2 mg/mL) via PCA after surgery and were followed for a period of 8 h. The primary outcome was nausea. Secondary outcome variables were pruritus, vomiting, sedation, pain report, pupillary miosis, and patient satisfaction.The side effect profile was not different between drugs

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2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

105. Therapeutic effect of intrathecal morphine after posterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery: a prospective, double-blind, randomized study (PubMed)

Therapeutic effect of intrathecal morphine after posterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery: a prospective, double-blind, randomized study Prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study.To assess the efficacy and safety of 0.4 mg intrathecal morphine for postoperative pain control after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) surgery.Multiple studies have established the technique of intrathecal morphine analgesia in a wide variety of clinical settings. Several trials were (...) conducted in patients undergoing spine surgery, generally supporting the efficacy for this type of surgery. Many exhibit methodologic problems with dosing regimes or study design.After the institutional review board-approval and written informed consent, 52 patients scheduled for PLIF-surgery were enrolled, of whom 46 could be analyzed. Patients were randomized to receive 0.4 mg morphine (M-group) or normal saline (P-group) intrathecally under direct vision before the end of surgery. Additionally, all

2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

106. Postoperative ketamine administration decreases morphine consumption in major abdominal surgery: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled study (PubMed)

Postoperative ketamine administration decreases morphine consumption in major abdominal surgery: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled study Ketamine decreases postoperative morphine consumption, but its optimal dosing and duration of administration remain unclear. In this study, we compared the effects of ketamine administration on morphine consumption limited to the intraoperative period, or continued for 48 h postoperatively.Eighty-one patients scheduled for abdominal surgery (...) were prospectively randomized under double-blind conditions to three groups: (1) PERI group receiving intraoperative and postoperative ketamine for the first 48 h after surgery (2 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1) after a 0.5 mg/kg bolus); (2) INTRA group receiving intraoperative ketamine administration only (2 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1) after a 0.5 mg/kg bolus); and (3) CTRL group receiving placebo. Morphine consumption, visual analog scale scores and side effects (sedation score, nausea-vomiting score

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2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

107. Intranasal fentanyl and intravenous morphine did not differ for pain relief in children with closed long-bone fractures

Intranasal fentanyl and intravenous morphine did not differ for pain relief in children with closed long-bone fractures Intranasal fentanyl and intravenous morphine did not differ for pain relief in children with closed long-bone fracturesCommentary | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using (...) your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Intranasal fentanyl and intravenous morphine did not differ for pain relief in children with closed long-bone fracturesCommentary Article Text

2008 Evidence-Based Nursing

108. Adverse effects of transdermal opiates treating moderate-severe cancer pain in comparison to long-acting morphine: a meta-analysis and systematic review of the literature

Adverse effects of transdermal opiates treating moderate-severe cancer pain in comparison to long-acting morphine: a meta-analysis and systematic review of the literature Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2008 DARE.

109. Oral morphine for cancer pain. (PubMed)

Oral morphine for cancer pain. This is an updated version of a previous Cochrane review first published in Issue 4, 2003 of The Cochrane Library. Morphine has been used for many years to relieve pain. Oral morphine in either immediate release or modified release form remains the analgesic of choice for moderate or severe cancer pain.To determine the efficacy of oral morphine in relieving cancer pain and to assess the incidence and severity of adverse effects.The following databases were (...) searched: Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care Group Trials Register (December 2006); Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2006, Issue 4); MEDLINE (1966 to December 2006); and EMBASE (1974 to December 2006).Published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) reporting on the analgesic effect of oral morphine in adults and children with cancer pain. Any comparator trials were considered. Trials with fewer than ten participants were excluded.One review author

2007 Cochrane

110. Drugs - Morphine Sulphate Oral Solution

Drugs - Morphine Sulphate Oral Solution Morphine Sulphate Oral Solution MOR Drugs October 2006 Page 1 of 3 Drugs PRESENTATION 5ml unit dose vials containing morphine sulphate 10 milligrams in 5ml (2 milligrams in 1ml). ACTIONS Morphine is a strong opioid analgesic drug for oral administration for pain relief. It is particularly useful for treating severe continuous pain of visceral or soft tissue origins. Morphine produces sedation, euphoria and analgesia; it may both depress respiration (...) and induce hypotension. Histamine is released following morphine administration, this may contribute to its vasodilatory effects and it may also cause bronchoconstriction. INDICATIONS Severe pain. The decision about which analgesia and which route should be guided by clinical judgement (see adult and child pain management guidelines). CONTRA-INDICATIONS Do NOT give oral morphine in the following circumstances: Unable to swallow or protect own airway. Cardiac pain – use intravenous morphine. Children

2007 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

111. Drugs - Morphine Sulphate

Drugs - Morphine Sulphate Morphine Sulphate MOR Drugs October 2006 Page 1 of 4 Drugs PRESENTATION Ampoules containing Morphine Sulphate 10 milligrams in 1ml. ACTIONS Morphine is a strong opioid analgesic drug for parenteral administration for pain relief. It is particularly useful for treating severe continuous pain of visceral or soft tissue origins. Morphine produces sedation, euphoria and analgesia; it may both depress respiration and induce hypotension. Histamine is released following (...) morphine administration, this may contribute to its vasodilatory effects and it may also cause bronchoconstriction. INDICATIONS Pain associated with suspected myocardial infarction (analgesic of ?rst choice). Severe pain. The decision about which analgesia and which route should be guided by clinical judgement (refer to adult and child pain management guidelines). CONTRA-INDICATIONS Do NOT give morphine in the following circumstances: Children under 1 year of age. Respiratory depression (Adult 65 2.5

2007 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

112. Intranasal fentanyl and intravenous morphine did not differ for pain relief in children with closed long-bone fractures

Intranasal fentanyl and intravenous morphine did not differ for pain relief in children with closed long-bone fractures Intranasal fentanyl and intravenous morphine did not differ for pain relief in children with closed long-bone fractures | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your (...) username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Intranasal fentanyl and intravenous morphine did not differ for pain relief in children with closed long-bone fractures Article Text Therapeutics

2007 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

113. A qualitative systematic review of morphine treatment in children with postoperative pain

A qualitative systematic review of morphine treatment in children with postoperative pain Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2007 DARE.

114. Morphine Sulphate Oral Solution

Morphine Sulphate Oral Solution Morphine Sulphate Oral Solution MOR Drugs October 2006 Page 1 of 3 Drugs PRESENTATION 5ml unit dose vials containing morphine sulphate 10 milligrams in 5ml (2 milligrams in 1ml). ACTIONS Morphine is a strong opioid analgesic drug for oral administration for pain relief. It is particularly useful for treating severe continuous pain of visceral or soft tissue origins. Morphine produces sedation, euphoria and analgesia; it may both depress respiration and induce (...) hypotension. Histamine is released following morphine administration, this may contribute to its vasodilatory effects and it may also cause bronchoconstriction. INDICATIONS Severe pain. The decision about which analgesia and which route should be guided by clinical judgement (see adult and child pain management guidelines). CONTRA-INDICATIONS Do NOT give oral morphine in the following circumstances: Unable to swallow or protect own airway. Cardiac pain – use intravenous morphine. Children under 1 year

2006 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

115. Morphine Sulphate

Morphine Sulphate Morphine Sulphate MOR Drugs October 2006 Page 1 of 4 Drugs PRESENTATION Ampoules containing Morphine Sulphate 10 milligrams in 1ml. ACTIONS Morphine is a strong opioid analgesic drug for parenteral administration for pain relief. It is particularly useful for treating severe continuous pain of visceral or soft tissue origins. Morphine produces sedation, euphoria and analgesia; it may both depress respiration and induce hypotension. Histamine is released following morphine (...) administration, this may contribute to its vasodilatory effects and it may also cause bronchoconstriction. INDICATIONS Pain associated with suspected myocardial infarction (analgesic of ?rst choice). Severe pain. The decision about which analgesia and which route should be guided by clinical judgement (refer to adult and child pain management guidelines). CONTRA-INDICATIONS Do NOT give morphine in the following circumstances: Children under 1 year of age. Respiratory depression (Adult 65 2.5 milligrams 2.5ml

2006 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

116. The Paining, Part I (Morphine in acute abdomen)

The Paining, Part I (Morphine in acute abdomen) The Paining, Part I (Morphine in acute abdomen) « Sinai EM Journal Club Emergency Medicine Discussion Forum The Paining, Part I (Morphine in acute abdomen) I’m finally getting around to the some of the good articles on ED pain management that appeared this summer. The first was in the August 2006 Annals of EM, an article by Gallagher, Esses et al. entitled, “ The authors tested the oft-repeated dictum that morphine affects diagnostic accuracy (...) , measuring pain on a 0-100mm visual scale in a prospective double-blind random trial, giving 0.1 mg / kg of IV Morphine sulfate or placebo (ouch!) with an endpoint of “diagnostic accuracy” (ie, comparing the provisional diagnosis made by an emergency physician in 15 minutes after the agent is given, vs. diagnosis at six or more weeks of followup.) They randomized 78 patients into the morphine arm, 73 into the placebo group. After fifteen minutes, the patients who got morphine changed their pain rating

2006 Sinai EM Journal Club

117. The Paining 2: Too Much Pain (Morphine vs. Dilaudid)

The Paining 2: Too Much Pain (Morphine vs. Dilaudid) The Paining 2: Too Much Pain (Morphine vs. Dilaudid) « Sinai EM Journal Club Emergency Medicine Discussion Forum The Paining 2: Too Much Pain (Morphine vs. Dilaudid) We continue to make our way through the recent pain management papers, once again turning to the August Annals ( ). Chang, Gallagher et al. strike back with a second analgesia piece in this issue — from now on, Montefiore will be simply be known as the House of Pain. The paper’s (...) called Safety and Efficacy of Hydromorphone as an Analgesic Alternative to Morphine in Acute Pain: An RCT (if you’re logged into the Sinai library, full text is ). It’s full of provocative hypotheses, good study technique, and fun historical trivia… more below! While some may doubt it, surveys and chart reviews still suggest pain is not well treated in the ED — even 0.1 mg / kg of morphine (resulting in 10 mg in the heavy folks) probably isn’t sufficient. Yet docs are loathe to order 10 mg off

2006 Sinai EM Journal Club

118. Intravenous morphine and topical tetracaine for treatment of pain in [corrected] neonates undergoing central line placement. (PubMed)

Intravenous morphine and topical tetracaine for treatment of pain in [corrected] neonates undergoing central line placement. There is limited evidence of the analgesic effectiveness of opioid analgesia or topical anesthesia during central line placement in neonates, and there are no previous studies of their relative effectiveness.To determine the effectiveness and safety of topical tetracaine, intravenous morphine, or tetracaine plus morphine for alleviating pain in ventilated neonates during (...) central line placement.Randomized, double-blind, controlled trial enrolling 132 ventilated neonates (mean gestational age, 30.6 [SD, 4.6] weeks at study entry) and conducted between October 2000 and July 2005 in 2 neonatal intensive care units in Toronto, Ontario.Prior to central line insertion, neonates were randomly assigned to receive tetracaine (n = 42), morphine (n = 38), or both (n = 31); a separate nonrandomized group of 21 neonates receiving neither tetracaine nor morphine was used

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2006 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

119. Cost-effectiveness of thoracic patient-controlled epidural analgesia using bupivacaine with fentanyl vs. bupivacaine with morphine after thoracotomy and upper abdominal surgery

Cost-effectiveness of thoracic patient-controlled epidural analgesia using bupivacaine with fentanyl vs. bupivacaine with morphine after thoracotomy and upper abdominal surgery Cost-effectiveness of thoracic patient-controlled epidural analgesia using bupivacaine with fentanyl vs. bupivacaine with morphine after thoracotomy and upper abdominal surgery Cost-effectiveness of thoracic patient-controlled epidural analgesia using bupivacaine with fentanyl vs. bupivacaine with morphine after (...) analgesia (TPCEA), using bupivacaine with fentanyl (BF) or bupivacaine with morphine (BM). All the patients received balanced salt solution before the thoracic epidural catheter was placed at the thoracic level of 6 - 8 for thoracotomy and of 8 - 10 for upper abdominal surgery. All patients received general anaesthesia. No opioids were given intravenously during the preoperative and intraoperative period, except one dose of fentanyl (>/= 2 microg/kg) during the induction period. Intraoperative analgesia

2005 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

120. Effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on patient-controlled analgesia morphine side effects: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on patient-controlled analgesia morphine side effects: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on patient-controlled analgesia morphine side effects: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on patient-controlled analgesia morphine side effects: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Marret E, Kurdi O, Zufferey P, Bonnet F CRD summary (...) This review assessed the effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on morphine-related adverse effects in post-operative patient-controlled analgesia. The authors concluded that NSAIDs reduced post-operative nausea and vomiting and sedation, but not pruritus, urinary retention and respiratory depression. Other than the reporting of review methods, the review was well conducted and the authors' conclusions are likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives To assess the effects of non-steroidal

2005 DARE.