Latest & greatest articles for morphine

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on morphine or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on morphine and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for morphine

81. Risks and side-effects of intrathecal morphine combined with spinal anaesthesia: a meta-analysis

Risks and side-effects of intrathecal morphine combined with spinal anaesthesia: a meta-analysis Risks and side-effects of intrathecal morphine combined with spinal anaesthesia: a meta-analysis Risks and side-effects of intrathecal morphine combined with spinal anaesthesia: a meta-analysis Gehling M, Tryba M CRD summary This review found the use of intrathecal morphine in combination with spinal anaesthesia for post-operative analgesia was associated with an increase in nausea, vomiting (...) and pruritus. The authors' conclusions reflected the evidence presented but some methodological weaknesses mean that the reliability of these conclusions is unclear. Authors' objectives To assess the frequency of side-effects in patients receiving intrathecal morphine in combination with spinal anaesthesia. Searching MEDLINE was searched from inception to 2007; search terms were reported. Reference lists of retrieved articles were also searched for additional studies. It was unclear if any language

DARE.2009

82. Benefit and risk of intrathecal morphine without local anaesthetic in patients undergoing major surgery: meta-analysis of randomized trials

Benefit and risk of intrathecal morphine without local anaesthetic in patients undergoing major surgery: meta-analysis of randomized trials Benefit and risk of intrathecal morphine without local anaesthetic in patients undergoing major surgery: meta-analysis of randomized trials Benefit and risk of intrathecal morphine without local anaesthetic in patients undergoing major surgery: meta-analysis of randomized trials Meylan N, Elia N, Lysakowski C, Tramer MR CRD summary This review concluded (...) that use of intrathecal morphine (injected into cerebrospinal fluid) decreased postoperative pain intensity and morphine consumption for patients undergoing major surgery under general anaesthetic. Respiratory depression remained a major safety concern. The authors' conclusions reflected the evidence and may be reliable, although the small sizes of included trials and variable trial quality should be borne in mind. Authors' objectives To assess the efficacy and safety of intrathecal (injected

DARE.2009

83. The side effects of morphine and hydromorphone patient-controlled analgesia

The side effects of morphine and hydromorphone patient-controlled analgesia 18806056 2008 09 22 2008 10 09 2013 11 21 1526-7598 107 4 2008 Oct Anesthesia and analgesia Anesth. Analg. The side effects of morphine and hydromorphone patient-controlled analgesia. 1384-9 10.1213/ane.0b013e3181823efb Despite "clinical lore" among health care providers that treatment with hydromorphone results in improved pain control and fewer adverse side effects, morphine continues to be the first-line medication (...) for postoperative patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). In this study, we compared the efficacy and side-effect profiles of morphine and hydromorphone at concentrations producing equivalent drug effect measured by pain score and miosis. We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind trial of 50 general and gynecological surgery patients. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive either morphine (1 mg/mL) or hydromorphone (0.2 mg/mL) via PCA after surgery and were followed for a period of 8 h. The primary

EvidenceUpdates2008

84. Therapeutic effect of intrathecal morphine after posterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery: a prospective, double-blind, randomized study

Therapeutic effect of intrathecal morphine after posterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery: a prospective, double-blind, randomized study 18923312 2008 10 16 2008 12 12 2013 11 21 1528-1159 33 22 2008 Oct 15 Spine Spine Therapeutic effect of intrathecal morphine after posterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery: a prospective, double-blind, randomized study. 2379-86 10.1097/BRS.0b013e3181844ef2 Prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. To assess the efficacy and safety (...) of 0.4 mg intrathecal morphine for postoperative pain control after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) surgery. Multiple studies have established the technique of intrathecal morphine analgesia in a wide variety of clinical settings. Several trials were conducted in patients undergoing spine surgery, generally supporting the efficacy for this type of surgery. Many exhibit methodologic problems with dosing regimes or study design. After the institutional review board-approval and written

EvidenceUpdates2008

85. Postoperative ketamine administration decreases morphine consumption in major abdominal surgery: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled study

Postoperative ketamine administration decreases morphine consumption in major abdominal surgery: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled study 18499623 2008 05 23 2008 06 05 2013 11 21 1526-7598 106 6 2008 Jun Anesthesia and analgesia Anesth. Analg. Postoperative ketamine administration decreases morphine consumption in major abdominal surgery: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled study. 1856-61 10.1213/ane.0b013e3181732776 Ketamine decreases postoperative morphine (...) consumption, but its optimal dosing and duration of administration remain unclear. In this study, we compared the effects of ketamine administration on morphine consumption limited to the intraoperative period, or continued for 48 h postoperatively. Eighty-one patients scheduled for abdominal surgery were prospectively randomized under double-blind conditions to three groups: (1) PERI group receiving intraoperative and postoperative ketamine for the first 48 h after surgery (2 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1

EvidenceUpdates2008

86. Adverse effects of transdermal opiates treating moderate-severe cancer pain in comparison to long-acting morphine: a meta-analysis and systematic review of the literature

Adverse effects of transdermal opiates treating moderate-severe cancer pain in comparison to long-acting morphine: a meta-analysis and systematic review of the literature Adverse effects of transdermal opiates treating moderate-severe cancer pain in comparison to long-acting morphine: a meta-analysis and systematic review of the literature Adverse effects of transdermal opiates treating moderate-severe cancer pain in comparison to long-acting morphine: a meta-analysis and systematic review (...) of the literature Tassinari D, Sartori S, Tamburini E, Scarpi E, Raffaeli W, Tombesi P, Maltoni M CRD summary This review found that transdermal opiates and slow-release oral morphine had similar overall adverse effect rates, for patients with moderate-to-severe cancer pain, but transdermal opiates had lower rates of some effects, such as constipation. Due to limitations including questionable trial quality, low sample numbers, and inconsistency in some analyses, these conclusions require cautious

DARE.2008

87. Intranasal fentanyl and intravenous morphine did not differ for pain relief in children with closed long-bone fractures

Intranasal fentanyl and intravenous morphine did not differ for pain relief in children with closed long-bone fractures Intranasal fentanyl and intravenous morphine did not differ for pain relief in children with closed long-bone fractures | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in via your Society Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username (...) * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in via your Society Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Intranasal fentanyl and intravenous morphine did not differ for pain relief in children with closed long-bone fractures Article Text Treatment Intranasal fentanyl and intravenous morphine did not differ for pain

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2008

88. Oral morphine for cancer pain.

Oral morphine for cancer pain. BACKGROUND: This is an updated version of a previous Cochrane review first published in Issue 4, 2003 of The Cochrane Library. Morphine has been used for many years to relieve pain. Oral morphine in either immediate release or modified release form remains the analgesic of choice for moderate or severe cancer pain. OBJECTIVES: To determine the efficacy of oral morphine in relieving cancer pain and to assess the incidence and severity of adverse effects. SEARCH (...) STRATEGY: The following databases were searched: Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care Group Trials Register (December 2006); Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2006, Issue 4); MEDLINE (1966 to December 2006); and EMBASE (1974 to December 2006). SELECTION CRITERIA: Published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) reporting on the analgesic effect of oral morphine in adults and children with cancer pain. Any comparator trials were considered. Trials

Cochrane2007

89. A qualitative systematic review of morphine treatment in children with postoperative pain

A qualitative systematic review of morphine treatment in children with postoperative pain A qualitative systematic review of morphine treatment in children with postoperative pain A qualitative systematic review of morphine treatment in children with postoperative pain Duedahl T H, Hansen E H CRD summary The authors concluded that morphine alone was no more effective than other active interventions for relieving postoperative pain in children and caused more side effects. The conclusions may (...) need to be interpreted with some caution, mainly due to limitations in the search, heterogeneity of the primary studies and the inclusion in the review of only morphine-related side effects. Authors' objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of different morphine regimens for children with postoperative pain. Searching MEDLINE via PubMed (from 1966), EMBASE (from 1989) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched to March 2006. Search terms were reported. The reference

DARE.2007

90. Intranasal fentanyl and intravenous morphine did not differ for pain relief in children with closed long-bone fractures

Intranasal fentanyl and intravenous morphine did not differ for pain relief in children with closed long-bone fractures Intranasal fentanyl and intravenous morphine did not differ for pain relief in children with closed long-bone fractures | Evidence-Based Medicine This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name (...) or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Intranasal fentanyl and intravenous morphine did not differ for pain relief in children with closed long-bone fractures Article Text Therapeutics Intranasal fentanyl and intravenous morphine did not differ for pain relief in children with closed long-bone fractures Statistics

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2007

95. The Paining 2: Too Much Pain (Morphine vs. Dilaudid)

The Paining 2: Too Much Pain (Morphine vs. Dilaudid) The Paining 2: Too Much Pain (Morphine vs. Dilaudid) « Sinai EM Journal Club Emergency Medicine Discussion Forum The Paining 2: Too Much Pain (Morphine vs. Dilaudid) We continue to make our way through the recent pain management papers, once again turning to the August Annals ( ). Chang, Gallagher et al. strike back with a second analgesia piece in this issue — from now on, Montefiore will be simply be known as the House of Pain. The paper’s (...) called Safety and Efficacy of Hydromorphone as an Analgesic Alternative to Morphine in Acute Pain: An RCT (if you’re logged into the Sinai library, full text is ). It’s full of provocative hypotheses, good study technique, and fun historical trivia… more below! While some may doubt it, surveys and chart reviews still suggest pain is not well treated in the ED — even 0.1 mg / kg of morphine (resulting in 10 mg in the heavy folks) probably isn’t sufficient. Yet docs are loathe to order 10 mg off

Sinai EM Journal Club2006

96. The Paining, Part I (Morphine in acute abdomen)

The Paining, Part I (Morphine in acute abdomen) The Paining, Part I (Morphine in acute abdomen) « Sinai EM Journal Club Emergency Medicine Discussion Forum The Paining, Part I (Morphine in acute abdomen) I’m finally getting around to the some of the good articles on ED pain management that appeared this summer. The first was in the August 2006 Annals of EM, an article by Gallagher, Esses et al. entitled, “ The authors tested the oft-repeated dictum that morphine affects diagnostic accuracy (...) , measuring pain on a 0-100mm visual scale in a prospective double-blind random trial, giving 0.1 mg / kg of IV Morphine sulfate or placebo (ouch!) with an endpoint of “diagnostic accuracy” (ie, comparing the provisional diagnosis made by an emergency physician in 15 minutes after the agent is given, vs. diagnosis at six or more weeks of followup.) They randomized 78 patients into the morphine arm, 73 into the placebo group. After fifteen minutes, the patients who got morphine changed their pain rating

Sinai EM Journal Club2006

97. Intravenous morphine and topical tetracaine for treatment of pain in [corrected] neonates undergoing central line placement.

Intravenous morphine and topical tetracaine for treatment of pain in [corrected] neonates undergoing central line placement. 16478902 2006 02 15 2006 02 21 2016 10 17 1538-3598 295 7 2006 Feb 15 JAMA JAMA Intravenous morphine and topical tetracaine for treatment of pain in [corrected] neonates undergoing central line placement. 793-800 There is limited evidence of the analgesic effectiveness of opioid analgesia or topical anesthesia during central line placement in neonates (...) , and there are no previous studies of their relative effectiveness. To determine the effectiveness and safety of topical tetracaine, intravenous morphine, or tetracaine plus morphine for alleviating pain in ventilated neonates during central line placement. Randomized, double-blind, controlled trial enrolling 132 ventilated neonates (mean gestational age, 30.6 [SD, 4.6] weeks at study entry) and conducted between October 2000 and July 2005 in 2 neonatal intensive care units in Toronto, Ontario. Prior to central line

JAMA2006

98. Effects of acetaminophen on morphine side-effects and consumption after major surgery: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Effects of acetaminophen on morphine side-effects and consumption after major surgery: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Effects of acetaminophen on morphine side-effects and consumption after major surgery: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Effects of acetaminophen on morphine side-effects and consumption after major surgery: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Remy C, Marret E, Bonnet F CRD summary The authors concluded that the addition of acetaminophen (...) to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia with morphine reduces the need for morphine in patients undergoing major surgery, but does not affect morphine-related side-effects. The authors' conclusions appear to be supported by the data presented, but limited reporting of review methods means it is not possible to confirm their reliability. Authors' objectives To determine the effect of adding acetaminophen (paracetamol) to intravenous (i.v.) patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with morphine on opioid-related

DARE.2005

99. Effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on patient-controlled analgesia morphine side effects: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on patient-controlled analgesia morphine side effects: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on patient-controlled analgesia morphine side effects: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on patient-controlled analgesia morphine side effects: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Marret E, Kurdi O, Zufferey P, Bonnet F CRD summary (...) This review assessed the effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on morphine-related adverse effects in post-operative patient-controlled analgesia. The authors concluded that NSAIDs reduced post-operative nausea and vomiting and sedation, but not pruritus, urinary retention and respiratory depression. Other than the reporting of review methods, the review was well conducted and the authors' conclusions are likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives To assess the effects of non-steroidal

DARE.2005

100. Cost-effectiveness of thoracic patient-controlled epidural analgesia using bupivacaine with fentanyl vs. bupivacaine with morphine after thoracotomy and upper abdominal surgery

Cost-effectiveness of thoracic patient-controlled epidural analgesia using bupivacaine with fentanyl vs. bupivacaine with morphine after thoracotomy and upper abdominal surgery Cost-effectiveness of thoracic patient-controlled epidural analgesia using bupivacaine with fentanyl vs. bupivacaine with morphine after thoracotomy and upper abdominal surgery Cost-effectiveness of thoracic patient-controlled epidural analgesia using bupivacaine with fentanyl vs. bupivacaine with morphine after (...) analgesia (TPCEA), using bupivacaine with fentanyl (BF) or bupivacaine with morphine (BM). All the patients received balanced salt solution before the thoracic epidural catheter was placed at the thoracic level of 6 - 8 for thoracotomy and of 8 - 10 for upper abdominal surgery. All patients received general anaesthesia. No opioids were given intravenously during the preoperative and intraoperative period, except one dose of fentanyl (>/= 2 microg/kg) during the induction period. Intraoperative analgesia

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2005