Latest & greatest articles for mindfulness

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on mindfulness and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Top results for mindfulness

121. Mindfulness-based stress reduction for people with chronic diseases Full Text available with Trip Pro

Mindfulness-based stress reduction for people with chronic diseases Mindfulness-based stress reduction for people with chronic diseases Mindfulness-based stress reduction for people with chronic diseases Merkes M CRD summary The review found that participation in a MBSR programme was likely to improve symptom management, overall quality of life and health outcomes in individuals with chronic disease. In view of limitations in the review, including marked clinical and methodological differences (...) between the studies, failure to assess study validity and lack of statistical information, these conclusions may not be reliable. Authors' objectives To determine the effectiveness of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) as a supportive therapy for people with chronic diseases. Searching PsycINFO, PubMed, EMBASE, Meditext, Informit, AgeLine, ProQuest, PsycARTICLES, CINAHL and an unspecified Wiley database were searched from 1998 to June 2009. Search terms were reported. The search was limited

2010 DARE.

122. Effects of Low-Dose Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR-ld) on Working Adults Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effects of Low-Dose Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR-ld) on Working Adults Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) has produced behavioral, psychological, and physiological benefits, but these programs typically require a substantial time commitment from the participants. This study assessed the effects of a shortened (low-dose [ld]) work-site MBSR intervention (MBSR-ld) on indicators of stress in healthy working adults to determine if results similar to those obtained in traditional (...) MBSR could be demonstrated. Participants were randomized into MBSR-ld and wait-list control groups. Self-reported perceived stress, sleep quality, and mindfulness were measured at the beginning and end of the 6-week intervention. Salivary cortisol was assessed weekly. Significant reductions in perceived stress (p = .0025) and increases in mindfulness (p = .0149) were obtained for only the MBSR-ld group (n = 22). Scores on the global measure of sleep improved for the MBSR-ld group (p = .0018

2009 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

123. Mindfulness-based stress reduction for stress management in healthy people: a review and meta-analysis

Mindfulness-based stress reduction for stress management in healthy people: a review and meta-analysis Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2009 DARE.

124. Mindfulness meditation for substance use disorders: a systematic review

Mindfulness meditation for substance use disorders: a systematic review Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2009 DARE.

125. Comparison of cognitive behavioral and mindfulness meditation interventions on adaptation to rheumatoid arthritis for patients with and without history of recurrent depression (Abstract)

Comparison of cognitive behavioral and mindfulness meditation interventions on adaptation to rheumatoid arthritis for patients with and without history of recurrent depression This research examined whether cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness interventions that target responses to chronic stress, pain, and depression reduce pain and improve the quality of everyday life for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The 144 RA participants were clustered into groups of 6-10 participants (...) and randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments: cognitive behavioral therapy for pain (P); mindfulness meditation and emotion regulation therapy (M); or education-only group (E), which served as an attention placebo control. The authors took a multimethod approach, employing daily diaries and laboratory assessment of pain and mitogen-stimulated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a proinflammatory cytokine. Participants receiving P showed the greatest Pre to Post improvement in self-reported pain control

2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

126. Review: acupuncture and mind-body therapies may be effective for cancer related pain

Review: acupuncture and mind-body therapies may be effective for cancer related pain Review: acupuncture and mind-body therapies may be effective for cancer related pain | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional (...) accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: acupuncture and mind-body therapies may be effective for cancer related pain Article Text Treatment Review: acupuncture and mind-body therapies may be effective for cancer related pain Statistics from Altmetric.com

2008 Evidence-Based Nursing

127. Mind the gap: equity and trends in coverage of maternal, newborn, and child health services in 54 Countdown countries. (Abstract)

Mind the gap: equity and trends in coverage of maternal, newborn, and child health services in 54 Countdown countries. Increasing the coverage of key maternal, newborn, and child health interventions is essential if Millennium Development Goals (MDG) 4 and 5 are to be reached. We have assessed equity and trends in coverage rates of a key set of interventions through a summary index, to provide overall insight into past performance and progress perspectives.Data from household surveys from 54

2008 Lancet

128. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy: evaluating current evidence and informing future research Full Text available with Trip Pro

Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy: evaluating current evidence and informing future research Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is a recently developed class-based program designed to prevent relapse or recurrence of major depression (Z. V. Segal, J. M. G. Williams, & J. Teasdale, 2002). Although research in this area is in its infancy, MBCT is generally discussed as a promising therapy in terms of clinical effectiveness. The aim of this review was to outline the evidence

2008 EvidenceUpdates

129. Mindfulness meditation for the treatment of chronic low back pain in older adults: a randomized controlled pilot study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Mindfulness meditation for the treatment of chronic low back pain in older adults: a randomized controlled pilot study The objectives of this pilot study were to assess the feasibility of recruitment and adherence to an eight-session mindfulness meditation program for community-dwelling older adults with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and to develop initial estimates of treatment effects. It was designed as a randomized, controlled clinical trial. Participants were 37 community-dwelling older (...) adults aged 65 years and older with CLBP of moderate intensity occurring daily or almost every day. Participants were randomized to an 8-week mindfulness-based meditation program or to a wait-list control group. Baseline, 8-week and 3-month follow-up measures of pain, physical function, and quality of life were assessed. Eighty-nine older adults were screened and 37 found to be eligible and randomized within a 6-month period. The mean age of the sample was 74.9 years, 21/37 (57%) of participants were

2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

130. Effects of mindful and non-mindful exercises on people with depression: a systematic review

Effects of mindful and non-mindful exercises on people with depression: a systematic review Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2008 DARE.

131. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy to prevent relapse in recurrent depression

Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy to prevent relapse in recurrent depression Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2008 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

132. Effect of mindfulness-based stress reduction in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of mindfulness-based stress reduction in rheumatoid arthritis patients. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of a meditation training program, Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR), on depressive symptoms, psychological status, and disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) through a randomized, waitlist-controlled pilot study. METHODS: Participants were randomized to either an MBSR group, where they attended an 8-week course and 4-month maintenance program (...) , or to a waitlist control group, where they attended all assessment visits and received MBSR free of charge after study end. Participants received usual care from their rheumatologists throughout the trial. Self-report questionnaires were used to evaluate depressive symptoms, psychological distress, well-being, and mindfulness. Evaluation of RA disease activity (by Disease Activity Score in 28 joints) included examination by a physician masked to treatment status. Adjusted means and mean changes in outcomes

2007 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

133. The effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on sleep disturbance: a systematic review

The effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on sleep disturbance: a systematic review The effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on sleep disturbance: a systematic review The effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on sleep disturbance: a systematic review Winbush N Y, Gross C R, Kreitzer M J CRD summary The authors concluded that limited evidence suggested mindfulness-based stress reduction interventions (MBSR) may improve sleep, but more research was required. Despite (...) limitations of this review, the authors’ conclusions appeared reasonable. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) interventions on sleep disturbance. Searching MEDLINE (from 1966), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (from 1985), CINAHL (from 1982), PsycINFO (from 1985), Digital Dissertations and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched to 2006 for studies reported in English. Search terms were reported. Reference lists

2007 DARE.

134. Tai chi chuan: mind-body practice or exercise intervention? Studying the benefit for cancer survivors Full Text available with Trip Pro

Tai chi chuan: mind-body practice or exercise intervention? Studying the benefit for cancer survivors Tai chi chuan: mind-body practice or exercise intervention? Studying the benefit for cancer survivors Tai chi chuan: mind-body practice or exercise intervention? Studying the benefit for cancer survivors Mansky P, Sannes T, Wallerstedt D, Ge A, Ryan M, Johnson L L, Chesney M, Gerber L CRD summary This review evaluated the effects of t'ai chi chuan (TCC). The authors concluded that cancer (...) : The authors did not state any implications for practice. Research: The authors state the need to develop methods of evaluating the effect of interventions like TCC on mind-body and wellness outcomes. They provided details of the design of a study currently underway that will compare TCC with aerobic exercise in cancer survivors. Bibliographic details Mansky P, Sannes T, Wallerstedt D, Ge A, Ryan M, Johnson L L, Chesney M, Gerber L. Tai chi chuan: mind-body practice or exercise intervention? Studying

2006 DARE.

135. Mindfulness-based stress reduction as supportive therapy in cancer care: systematic review

Mindfulness-based stress reduction as supportive therapy in cancer care: systematic review Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2005 DARE.

136. Mindfulness-based stress reduction and health benefits: a meta-analysis

Mindfulness-based stress reduction and health benefits: a meta-analysis Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2004 DARE.

137. London's State of Mind

London's State of Mind London's State of Mind | The King's Fund Main navigation Health and care services Leadership, systems and organisations Patients, people and society Policy, finance and performance Search term Apply London's State of Mind: The King's Fund mental health inquiry 2003 This content relates to the following topics: Share this content Authors Ros Levenson Angela Greatley Janice Robinson Publication details ISBN 978 1 85717 482 3 Pages 178 In 1997, an inquiry from The King's

2003 The King's Fund

138. Mind and cancer: does psychosocial intervention improve survival and psychological well-being?

Mind and cancer: does psychosocial intervention improve survival and psychological well-being? Mind and cancer: does psychosocial intervention improve survival and psychological well-being? Mind and cancer: does psychosocial intervention improve survival and psychological well-being? Ross L, Boesen E H, Dalton S O, Johansen C Authors' objectives To assess the effectiveness of psychosocial intervention for improving survival and psychological well-being in people with cancer. Searching MEDLINE (...) Wedell-Wedellsborg's Fund (grant number 579); IMK General Fund (grant number 30206-081). Bibliographic details Ross L, Boesen E H, Dalton S O, Johansen C. Mind and cancer: does psychosocial intervention improve survival and psychological well-being? European Journal of Cancer 2002; 38(11): 1447-1457 PubMedID Other publications of related interest Ross-Petersen L, Johansen C, Olsen JH. Har psykosocial intervention blandt cancerpatienter effekt pa overlevelse og psyckologisk velbefindende? Ugeskr

2002 DARE.

139. Mind-body interventions for gastrointestinal conditions

Mind-body interventions for gastrointestinal conditions Mind-body interventions for gastrointestinal conditions Mind-body interventions for gastrointestinal conditions Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Mind-body interventions (...) for gastrointestinal conditions. Rockville: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Evidence Report/Technology Assessment No. 40. 2001 Authors' objectives The objective of this evidence report was to conduct a search of the literature on the use of all mind-body therapies for the treatment of health conditions and, on the basis of that search, to choose either a condition or a mind-body modality for a comprehensive review. The health condition chosen, based on the results of an initial search

2001 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

140. Mind-body interventions for gastrointestinal conditions

Mind-body interventions for gastrointestinal conditions Mind-body interventions for gastrointestinal conditions Mind-body interventions for gastrointestinal conditions Coulter I D, Hardy M L, Favreau J T, Elfenbaum P D, Morton S C, Roth E A, Genovese B J, Shekelle P G Authors' objectives To evaluate the efficacy of mind-body therapies for the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. Searching An initial broad search (described in the report) was used to scope the mind-body literature (...) eligible. Randomised controlled trials and controlled clinical trials were included in the review. Specific interventions included in the review Mind-body therapies recognised by the U.S. National Centre for Complimentary and Alternative Medicine were eligible. The interventions included were biofeedback, relaxation therapy, behavioural therapy, cognitive therapy, guided imagery, hypnosis, placebo as therapy and multimodal (combination) therapies. The nature of these therapies was described

2001 DARE.