Latest & greatest articles for methylprednisolone

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Top results for methylprednisolone

61. Controlled trial of pulse methylprednisolone versus two regimens of pulse cyclophosphamide in severe lupus nephritis. (PubMed)

Controlled trial of pulse methylprednisolone versus two regimens of pulse cyclophosphamide in severe lupus nephritis. Pulse cyclophosphamide is more effective than prednisone alone in preventing renal failure in lupus nephritis. We undertook a randomised, controlled trial to find out whether pulse methylprednisolone could equal pulse cyclophosphamide in preserving renal function in patients with lupus nephritis, and whether there was a difference between long and short courses of pulse (...) cyclophosphamide in preventing exacerbations. 65 patients (60 female, 5 male; median [range] age 29 [10-48] years) with severe lupus nephritis were assigned randomly to monthly pulse methylprednisolone for 6 months (25 patients), monthly pulse cyclophosphamide for 6 months (20), or monthly cyclophosphamide for 6 months followed by quarterly pulse cyclophosphamide for 2 additional years (20). Patients treated with pulse methylprednisolone had a higher probability of doubling serum creatinine than those treated

1992 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

62. Methylprednisolone plus chlorambucil as compared with methylprednisolone alone for the treatment of idiopathic membranous nephropathy. The Italian Idiopathic Membranous Nephropathy Treatment Study Group. (PubMed)

Methylprednisolone plus chlorambucil as compared with methylprednisolone alone for the treatment of idiopathic membranous nephropathy. The Italian Idiopathic Membranous Nephropathy Treatment Study Group. Treatment with methylprednisolone and chlorambucil may protect renal function and increase the chance of remission of the nephrotic syndrome in patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy. To determine whether similar results might be obtained with methylprednisolone alone, we compared (...) the effects of methylprednisolone and chlorambucil with those of methylprednisolone alone in 92 patients with the nephrotic syndrome caused by idiopathic membranous nephropathy. The patients were randomly assigned to receive either alternating one-month courses of methylprednisolone and then chlorambucil for a total of six months (group 1) or methylprednisolone alone for six months at the same cumulative dosage (group 2).Four of the 45 patients in group 1 (9 percent) and 1 of the 47 in group 2 (2 percent

1992 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain

63. Randomized, double-blind cross-over study of acute cisplatin-induced nausea and vomiting, comparing a new schedule of the combination of metoclopramide and methylprednisolone versus metoclopramide alone. (PubMed)

Randomized, double-blind cross-over study of acute cisplatin-induced nausea and vomiting, comparing a new schedule of the combination of metoclopramide and methylprednisolone versus metoclopramide alone. 2261379 1991 02 07 2016 10 17 0923-7534 1 5 1990 Sep Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology Ann. Oncol. Randomized, double-blind cross-over study of acute cisplatin-induced nausea and vomiting, comparing a new schedule of the combination (...) of metoclopramide and methylprednisolone versus metoclopramide alone. 379-80 Díaz-Rubio E E Servicio de Oncología Médica, Hospital Universitario San Carlos, Madrid. González-Larriba J L JL Rosell R R Abad A A Martín M M Valerdi J J JJ Barriga J J JJ eng Clinical Trial Comparative Study Journal Article Randomized Controlled Trial Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't England Ann Oncol 9007735 0923-7534 L4YEB44I46 Metoclopramide Q20Q21Q62J Cisplatin X4W7ZR7023 Methylprednisolone IM Adult Aged Cisplatin adverse effects

1991 Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

64. Treatment of aplastic anemia with antilymphocyte globulin and methylprednisolone with or without cyclosporine. The German Aplastic Anemia Study Group. (PubMed)

Treatment of aplastic anemia with antilymphocyte globulin and methylprednisolone with or without cyclosporine. The German Aplastic Anemia Study Group. Immunosuppression is the most effective treatment for patients with aplastic anemia, except for bone marrow transplantation. The best results are achieved with antilymphocyte globulin or cyclosporine. Patients have been treated successfully with a combination of both agents, but there has been no controlled evaluation of its efficacy. We (...) conducted a randomized, multicenter trial in 84 patients not eligible for bone marrow transplantation, comparing treatment with antilymphocyte globulin and methylprednisolone (41 patients--the control group) with antilymphocyte globulin, methylprednisolone, and cyclosporine (43 patients--the cyclosporine group).At three months significantly more patients in the cyclosporine group had a complete or partial remission in response to treatment than did patients in the control group (65 percent vs. 39

1991 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain

65. A randomized, controlled trial of methylprednisolone or naloxone in the treatment of acute spinal-cord injury. Results of the Second National Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study. (PubMed)

A randomized, controlled trial of methylprednisolone or naloxone in the treatment of acute spinal-cord injury. Results of the Second National Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study. Studies in animals indicate that methylprednisolone and naloxone are both potentially beneficial in acute spinal-cord injury, but whether any treatment is clinically effective remains uncertain. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of methylprednisolone and naloxone in a multicenter randomized, double-blind, placebo (...) -controlled trial in patients with acute spinal-cord injury, 95 percent of whom were treated within 14 hours of injury. Methylprednisolone was given to 162 patients as a bolus of 30 mg per kilogram of body weight, followed by infusion at 5.4 mg per kilogram per hour for 23 hours. Naloxone was given to 154 patients as a bolus of 5.4 mg per kilogram, followed by infusion at 4.0 mg per kilogram per hour for 23 hours. Placebos were given to 171 patients by bolus and infusion. Motor and sensory functions were

1990 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high

66. Double blind placebo controlled trial of pulse treatment with methylprednisolone combined with disease modifying drugs in rheumatoid arthritis. (PubMed)

Double blind placebo controlled trial of pulse treatment with methylprednisolone combined with disease modifying drugs in rheumatoid arthritis. To assess whether monthly treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone enhances or accelerates the effect of disease modifying drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.A 12 month double blind, placebo controlled, multicentre trial in which patients with active rheumatoid arthritis were randomly allocated to receive pulses of either (...) methylprednisolone or saline every four weeks for six months. At the start of the pulse treatment all patients were started on penicillamine or azathioprine.Four rheumatology departments in Denmark.97 Patients (71 women, 26 men) aged 23-84 (mean 60) who had active rheumatoid arthritis of at least four weeks' duration despite treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.Monthly clinical recording of morning stiffness, number of tender and swollen joints, blinded observers' evaluation of therapeutic effect

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1990 BMJ Controlled trial quality: predicted high

67. A randomized trial of methylprednisolone and chlorambucil in idiopathic membranous nephropathy. (PubMed)

A randomized trial of methylprednisolone and chlorambucil in idiopathic membranous nephropathy. We conducted a controlled trial to investigate the long-term effects of treatment with methylprednisolone and chlorambucil in patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy. We have previously reported that after a mean of 31 months, treated patients did better. We now report the results of a longer follow-up. Eighty-one patients with proteinuria (greater than or equal to 3.5 g per day) and biopsy (...) -proved membranous nephropathy were randomly assigned to receive either supportive therapy alone or a six-month course of corticosteroids alternated with chlorambucil (0.2 mg per kilogram of body weight per day) every other month. Methylprednisolone was first given intravenously in three pulses (1 g per day) and was then given orally (0.4 mg per kilogram per day) for 27 days. The patients were followed for 2 to 11 years (median, 5). Two patients in the control group and one in the treatment group died

1989 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain

68. A controlled clinical trial of high-dose methylprednisolone in the treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock. (PubMed)

A controlled clinical trial of high-dose methylprednisolone in the treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock. The use of high-dose corticosteroids in the treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock remains controversial. Our study was designed as a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of high-dose methylprednisolone sodium succinate for severe sepsis and septic shock. Diagnosis was based on the clinical suspicion of infection plus the presence of fever (...) or hypothermia (rectal temperature greater than 38.3 degrees C [101 degrees F] or less than 35.6 degrees C [96 degrees F]), tachypnea (greater than 20 breaths per minute), tachycardia (greater than 90 beats per minute), and the presence of one of the following indications of organ dysfunction: a change in mental status, hypoxemia, elevated lactate levels, or oliguria. Three hundred eighty-two patients were enrolled. Treatment--either methylprednisolone sodium succinate (30 mg per kilogram of body weight

1987 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high

69. A controlled trial of methylprednisolone in the emergency treatment of acute asthma. (PubMed)

A controlled trial of methylprednisolone in the emergency treatment of acute asthma. Ninety-seven acutely ill patients with bronchial asthma were enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial of intravenous methylprednisolone (125 mg), given on presentation in the emergency room in addition to standard emergency treatments for asthma. Subjective and spirometric indexes of the severity of the asthma were similar on entry into the study in all patients, but only 9 of 48 (...) patients (19 percent) treated with methylprednisolone required hospital admission, as compared with 23 of 49 patients (47 percent) in the control group (P less than 0.003). Our results suggest that prompt use of glucocorticoids in the emergency treatment of severe asthma can prevent significant morbidity, reduce the number of hospitalizations, and effect substantial savings in health care costs.

1986 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain

70. Controlled trial of methylprednisolone and chlorambucil in idiopathic membranous nephropathy. (PubMed)

Controlled trial of methylprednisolone and chlorambucil in idiopathic membranous nephropathy. Sixty-seven adults with idiopathic membranous nephropathy and the nephrotic syndrome were randomly assigned to symptomatic treatment only or to a six-month course of methylprednisolone alternated with chlorambucil every other month. Patients were followed for one to seven years. At the end of follow-up (mean of 31.4 +/- 18.2 months for the treated group and 37.0 +/- 22.0 for the control group) 23 of 32

1984 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain

71. Efficacy of methylprednisolone in acute spinal cord injury. (PubMed)

Efficacy of methylprednisolone in acute spinal cord injury. A multicenter double-blind randomized trial was conducted to examine the efficacy of a high dose of methylprednisolone (1,000-mg bolus and daily thereafter for ten days) compared with a standard dose (100-mg bolus and daily thereafter for ten days) in 330 patients with acute spinal cord injury. No difference in neurological recovery of motor function or pinprick and light touch sensation was observed between the two treatment groups

1984 JAMA Controlled trial quality: uncertain

72. A double-blind placebo-controlled trial of methylprednisolone pulse therapy in active rheumatoid disease. (PubMed)

A double-blind placebo-controlled trial of methylprednisolone pulse therapy in active rheumatoid disease. To confirm the findings of uncontrolled trials that methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPPT) is a safe treatment for active rheumatoid disease, a double-blind trial was conducted in which 20 patients with active rheumatoid disease were randomly allocated to receive an infusion of either 1 g methylprednisolone or placebo. Methylprednisolone produced significant improvement in all clinical (...) variables measured, a benefit which was sustained for at least 6 weeks. The placebo produced only transient improvement in some of the clinical variables measured. when the 10 placebo groups patients were later given an infusion of 1 g methylprednisolone, they too showed significant clinical benefit. The methylprednisolone also gave rise to improvements in some haematological and biochemical variables.

1982 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high