Latest & greatest articles for methylphenidate

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Top results for methylphenidate

1. Methylphenidate for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents - assessment of adverse events in non-randomised studies. (PubMed)

Methylphenidate for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents - assessment of adverse events in non-randomised studies. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder in childhood. The psychostimulant methylphenidate is the most frequently used medication to treat it. Several studies have investigated the benefits of methylphenidate, showing possible favourable effects on ADHD symptoms, but the true magnitude (...) of the effect is unknown. Concerning adverse events associated with the treatment, our systematic review of randomised clinical trials (RCTs) demonstrated no increase in serious adverse events, but a high proportion of participants suffered a range of non-serious adverse events.To assess the adverse events associated with methylphenidate treatment for children and adolescents with ADHD in non-randomised studies.In January 2016, we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, 12 other databases

2018 Cochrane

2. Methylphenidate in Children With ADHD With or Without Learning Disability.

Methylphenidate in Children With ADHD With or Without Learning Disability. To explore treatment response to Osmotic Release Oral System(®) (OROS) methylphenidate in children with ADHD with and without comorbid learning disability (LD).Data were analyzed from two 6-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover studies evaluating individually determined doses of OROS methylphenidate versus placebo in 135 children (ages 9 to 12 years) with ADHD with or without an LD in reading (...) , math, or both. The sample was demographically diverse, with 31% females and more than 40% minority, predominantly African American and Hispanic. On two laboratory school days, participants received either OROS methylphenidate or placebo and were given a battery of cognitive and behavioral tests.Treatment with OROS methylphenidate led to improvement in ADHD Rating Scale scores for participants with or without comorbid LD. Both groups performed better during treatment with OROS methylphenidate than

2014 Journal of attention disorders

3. OROS methylphenidate (Concerta) for the treatment of children and adults with ADHD

OROS methylphenidate (Concerta) for the treatment of children and adults with ADHD OROS methylphenidate (Concerta) for the treatment of children and adults with ADHD | Therapeutics Initiative Independent Healthcare Evidence > > OROS methylphenidate (Concerta) for the treatment of children and adults with ADHD Introduction Pharmaceutical Services Division (PSD) requested an update to the 2006 Therapeutics Initiative review of Concerta (OROS MPH) for the treatment of children and adults with ADHD (...) . The 2006 report included a systematic review in children and adolescents with ADHD. The recent submission includes additional new information in children and adolescents and also an additional new indication, for the treatment of adult patients with ADHD. Drug OROS methylphenidate is a central nervous system stimulant and a controlled substance under Schedule II. The OROS delivery technology provides a mixture of immediate and delayed release. Within 1 hour, plasma MPH concentrations reach an initial

2010 Therapeutics Letter

4. Methylphenidate for children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder. (PubMed)

Methylphenidate for children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder. Children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) frequently present with inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity, which are the cardinal symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The effectiveness of methylphenidate, a commonly used ADHD treatment, is therefore of interest in these children.To assess the effects of methylphenidate for symptoms of ADHD (inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity (...) ) and ASD (impairments in social interaction and communication, and repetitive, restricted or stereotypical behaviours) in children and adolescents aged 6 to 18 years with ASD.In November 2016, we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, 11 other databases and two trials registers. We also checked reference lists and contacted study authors and pharmaceutical companies.Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the effect of methylphenidate versus placebo on the core symptoms

2017 Cochrane

5. Methylphenidate for the treatment of depressive symptoms, including fatigue and apathy, in medically ill older adults and terminally ill adults

Methylphenidate for the treatment of depressive symptoms, including fatigue and apathy, in medically ill older adults and terminally ill adults Methylphenidate for the treatment of depressive symptoms, including fatigue and apathy, in medically ill older adults and terminally ill adults Methylphenidate for the treatment of depressive symptoms, including fatigue and apathy, in medically ill older adults and terminally ill adults Hardy SE CRD summary The review did not find definitive evidence (...) of effectiveness of methylphenidate in medically ill older adults with depression, fatigue or apathy, although it appeared to be tolerated in the short term. Due to variation in outcomes, methodological flaws in the included studies and shortcomings in the review process, the reliability of the author's conclusions is not clear. Authors' objectives To assess the efficacy and tolerability of methylphenidate for the treatment of depressive symptoms, fatigue and apathy in medically ill older adults and adults

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2009 DARE.

6. Methylphenidate remains first-choice drug treatment for children and young people with ADHD

Methylphenidate remains first-choice drug treatment for children and young people with ADHD Methylphenidate remains first-choice drug treatment for children and young people with ADHD Discover Portal Discover Portal Methylphenidate remains first-choice drug treatment for children and young people with ADHD Published on 6 November 2018 doi: The stimulant methylphenidate has the best balance of effectiveness against side effects in children and young people with attention deficit hyperactivity (...) or development. It is thought to affect around 5% of children worldwide and is more common in boys than girls. Many children improve with behavioural interventions and family support, with drug treatments reserved for more those more severely affected. Drug treatments include stimulants (such as methylphenidate and amphetamines) and non-stimulants (such as atomoxetine). This review aimed to compare the available drugs using a network meta-analysis. This type of analysis can weigh up the effectiveness

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

7. Sluggish Cognitive Tempo as a Possible Predictor of Methylphenidate Response in Children With ADHD: A Randomized Controlled Trial. (PubMed)

Sluggish Cognitive Tempo as a Possible Predictor of Methylphenidate Response in Children With ADHD: A Randomized Controlled Trial. To examine whether sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) symptomatology moderates dose response to methylphenidate and whether the impact of SCT on medication response is distinct from attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) subtype effects.Stimulant-naive children with ADHD predominantly inattentive type (ADHD-I; n = 126) or ADHD combined type (ADHD-C; n = 45 (...) ) aged 7-11 years were recruited from the community from September 2006 to June 2013 to participate in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, 4-week crossover trial of long-acting methylphenidate. ADHD diagnosis and subtype were established according to DSM-IV criteria using a structured interview and teacher ADHD symptom ratings. SCT symptoms were assessed using a teacher-rated scale with 2 factors (Sluggish/Sleepy and Daydreamy). Primary outcomes included (1) categorization of children

2018 Journal of Clinical Psychiatry

8. Cardiovascular safety of methylphenidate among children and young people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): nationwide self controlled case series study. (PubMed)

Cardiovascular safety of methylphenidate among children and young people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): nationwide self controlled case series study.  To determine whether treatment with methylphenidate in children and young people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was associated with cardiovascular events. Self controlled case series analysis. Nationwide health insurance database, 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2011, in South Korea. 1224 patients aged (...) ≤17 who had experienced an incident cardiovascular event and had had at least one incident prescription for methylphenidate. A recorded diagnosis (either a primary or secondary cause) of any of the following cardiovascular adverse events: arrhythmias (ICD-10 (international classification of diseases, 10th revision) codes I44, I45, I47, I48, I49), hypertension (codes I10-I15), myocardial infarction (code I21), ischemic stroke (code I63), or heart failure (code I50). Incidence rate ratios were

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2016 BMJ

9. Cardiovascular safety of methylphenidate

Cardiovascular safety of methylphenidate Cardiovascular safety of methylphenidate - National Elf Service Search National Elf Service Search National Elf Service » » » » Cardiovascular safety of methylphenidate Jun 20 2016 Posted by Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a common neuropsychiatric condition, characterised by age-inappropriate, pervasive and impairing levels of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Pharmacological (...) treatment is currently considered as an important component of the multimodal treatment of ADHD. Medications are recommended as the first treatment option in several guidelines/practice parameters (e.g., Pliszka S, 2007), at least for severe cases (NICE 2008, Taylor E. et al 2004), or as a treatment strategy for patients who did not respond to non-pharmacological interventions (NICE 2008). Drugs used to treat ADHD include psychostimulants (e.g., methylphenidate and amphetamine derivatives) and non

2016 The Mental Elf

10. Evidence on methylphenidate in children and adolescents with ADHD is in fact of ?very low quality?

Evidence on methylphenidate in children and adolescents with ADHD is in fact of ?very low quality? Evidence on methylphenidate in children and adolescents with ADHD is in fact of ‘very low quality’ | Evidence-Based Mental Health We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal (...) accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Evidence on methylphenidate in children and adolescents with ADHD is in fact of ‘very low quality’ Article Text Perspective Evidence on methylphenidate in children and adolescents with ADHD

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2016 Evidence-Based Mental Health

11. Methylphenidate for ADHD: have Cochrane got it wrong this time?

Methylphenidate for ADHD: have Cochrane got it wrong this time? Methylphenidate for ADHD: have Cochrane got it wrong? Search National Elf Service Search National Elf Service » » » » Methylphenidate for ADHD: have Cochrane got it wrong this time? Mar 10 2016 Posted by Recently Storebø et al (2015a) published a Cochrane systematic review on the efficacy and tolerability of methylphenidate (MPH) in children and adolescents for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD (...) controversy as it has challenged the quality of this prior evidence-base and suggests that there is significant uncertainty about the effectiveness of methylphenidate for the treatment of ADHD. Estimates suggest that ADHD affects around 2-5% of school-aged children and young people. Methods The authors report a Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of methylphenidate for the treatment of children and adolescents (age 18 years or younger) with ADHD. Major

2016 The Mental Elf

12. Long-acting versus short-acting methylphenidate for paediatric ADHD: a systematic review and meta-analysis of comparative efficacy

Long-acting versus short-acting methylphenidate for paediatric ADHD: a systematic review and meta-analysis of comparative efficacy Long-acting versus short-acting methylphenidate for paediatric ADHD: a systematic review and meta-analysis of comparative efficacy Long-acting versus short-acting methylphenidate for paediatric ADHD: a systematic review and meta-analysis of comparative efficacy Punja S, Zorzela L, Hartling L, Urichuk L, Vohra S CRD summary This review concluded that long-acting (...) methylphenidate had a modest benefit, over short-acting methylphenidate, for attention or overactivity, and hyperactivity or impulsivity, reported by parents, but short-acting methylphenidate was better, for hyperactivity reported by teachers. Discrepancies in ratings, possible overestimated effect sizes, small samples, and no long-term data, mean that these conclusions may not be reliable. Authors' objectives To assess the efficacy and safety of short-acting versus long-acting methylphenidate, to manage

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2013 DARE.

13. Can methylphenidate be used for adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)?

Can methylphenidate be used for adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)? application/msword

2017 Specialist Pharmacy Services

14. The Cochrane Collaboration withdraws a review on methylphenidate for adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

The Cochrane Collaboration withdraws a review on methylphenidate for adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder The Cochrane Collaboration withdraws a review on methylphenidate for adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using (...) your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here The Cochrane Collaboration withdraws a review on methylphenidate for adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder Article Text Methods

2017 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

15. Effects of clonidine and methylphenidate on family quality of life in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. (PubMed)

Effects of clonidine and methylphenidate on family quality of life in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The aim of this study was to determine the effect on family quality of life (QOL) of clonidine (CLON) and methylphenidate (MPH), used alone and in combination, in treating attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).Two proxy QOL measures were used in a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled 16-week trial of 122 children, ages 7-12 years, with ADHD. Children were randomized

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2009 Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology

16. Comparative efficacy and acceptability of methylphenidate and atomoxetine in treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis

Comparative efficacy and acceptability of methylphenidate and atomoxetine in treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2011 DARE.

17. Methylphenidate for Apathy in Community-Dwelling Older Veterans With Mild Alzheimer`s Disease: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

Methylphenidate for Apathy in Community-Dwelling Older Veterans With Mild Alzheimer`s Disease: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial Apathy is a common behavioral problem in Alzheimer's disease. Apathy has profound consequences, such as functional impairment, higher service utilization, higher caregiver burden, and increased mortality. The authors' objective was to study the effects of methylphenidate on apathy in Alzheimer's disease.A 12-week, prospective, double-blind (...) , randomized, placebo-controlled trial (methylphenidate versus placebo) was conducted in community-dwelling veterans (N=60) with mild Alzheimer's disease. The primary outcome for apathy (Apathy Evaluation Scale-Clinician) and secondary outcomes for cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination, Modified Mini-Mental State Examination), functional status (activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living), improvement and severity (Clinical Global Impressions Scale [CGI]), caregiver burden

2017 EvidenceUpdates

18. Methylphenidate for ADHD in children and adolescents: throwing the baby out with the bathwater

Methylphenidate for ADHD in children and adolescents: throwing the baby out with the bathwater Methylphenidate for ADHD in children and adolescents: throwing the baby out with the bathwater | Evidence-Based Mental Health We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts (...) OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Methylphenidate for ADHD in children and adolescents: throwing the baby out with the bathwater Article Text Perspective Methylphenidate for ADHD in children and adolescents: throwing the baby out

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2016 Evidence-Based Mental Health

19. Effect of vitamin D supplementation as adjunctive therapy to methylphenidate on ADHD symptoms: A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial. (PubMed)

Effect of vitamin D supplementation as adjunctive therapy to methylphenidate on ADHD symptoms: A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial. Previous studies have shown that serum levels of vitamin D were lower in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) children compared to healthy controls. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of vitamin D supplementation as adjunctive therapy to methylphenidate on symptoms of children with ADHD.Sixty-two children aged 5-12 years (...) with a diagnosis of ADHD based on DSM-IV criteria were randomly assigned into two groups to receive either 2000IU vitamin D or placebo in addition to methylphenidate for 8 weeks. Symptoms severity was assessed by Conner's Parent Rating Scale-Revised[S] (CPRS), ADHD rating scale-IV (ADHD-RS), and Weekly Parent Ratings of Evening and Morning Behavior (WPREMB) at weeks 0, 4, and 8. Serum levels of 25(OH)D were measured at baseline and after 8 weeks. Anthropometric variables, dietary intake, physical activity, sun

2016 Nutritional neuroscience

20. Amphetamines and methylphenidate for paediatric ADHD: meta-analysis of n-of-1 trials

Amphetamines and methylphenidate for paediatric ADHD: meta-analysis of n-of-1 trials Amphetamines and methylphenidate for paediatric ADHD Search National Elf Service Search National Elf Service » » » » Amphetamines and methylphenidate for paediatric ADHD: meta-analysis of n-of-1 trials May 24 2016 Posted by Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders, with an estimated prevalence of about 5% in school-age children (Polanczyk et al, 2007 (...) ; Polanczyk et al, 2014) and 2.5% in adults. (Simon V et al, 2009). The recommended treatment of ADHD is multimodal, including pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. Medications for ADHD include psychostimulant (e.g., methylphenidate and amphetamine derivatives) and non-psychostimulant drugs (e.g., atomoxetine and guanfacine). Psychostimulants are the most common drugs used for ADHD worldwide. A large body of evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs), summarised in several meta

2016 The Mental Elf