Latest & greatest articles for menopause

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Top results for menopause

1. Menopause

Menopause CLINICAL PROFESSIONAL RESOURCE Menopause RCN guidance for nurses, midwives and health visitors Endorsed by This publication is supported by industryMENOPAUSE 2 This publication is due for review in November 2020. To provide feedback on its contents or on your experience of using the publication, please email publications.feedback@rcn.org.uk Acknowledgements This new publication is based on, and replaces, previous RCN publications – Women’s Health and the Menopause: RCN Guidance (...) for Nurses, Midwives and Health Visitors (RCN, 2005 and 2014) and Complementary Approaches to Menopausal Symptoms: RCN Guidance for Nurses, Midwives and Health Visitors (RCN, 2006). The RCN Women’s Health Forum would like to thank the menopause project team for the development of this publication: Debra Holloway (project chair), Nurse Consultant Gynaecology, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust and Chair of the RCN Women’s Health Forum Carmel Bagness, RCN Professional Lead Midwifery and Women’s

2018 Royal College of Nursing

3. Nonhormonal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms: 2015 position statement of The North American Menopause Society

Nonhormonal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms: 2015 position statement of The North American Menopause Society Copyright @ 2015 The North American Menopause Society. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited. POSITION STATEMENT Nonhormonal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms: 2015 position statement of The North American Menopause Society Abstract Objective: To update and expand The North American Menopause Society’s evidence-based position (...) on nonhormonal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms (VMS), previously a portion of the position statement on the management of VMS. Methods: NAMS enlisted clinical and research experts in the field and a reference librarian to identify and review available evidence. Five different electronic search engines were used to cull relevant literature. Using the literature, experts created a document for final approval by the NAMS Board of Trustees. Results: Nonhormonal management of VMS

2015 The North American Menopause Society

4. Treatments for reducing menopausal hot flushes are ranked for effectiveness

Treatments for reducing menopausal hot flushes are ranked for effectiveness Treatments for reducing menopausal hot flushes are ranked for effectiveness Discover Portal Discover Portal Treatments for reducing menopausal hot flushes are ranked for effectiveness Published on 25 July 2017 doi: A combination of oestrogen and progestogen via patches is the best treatment for menopause symptoms. Other options may be less beneficial, including tablets combining oestrogen and progestogen, and non (...) -hormonal treatments, isoflavones and black cohosh, though they may have other benefits. There is no evidence to support the use of antidepressants. Menopause affects women’s personal life and work life, but many don’t seek help from healthcare professionals. It is important to identify the most effective and safest treatment to help women in this transitional period. This review compared treatment options for the short-term management of hot flushes and night sweats in women aged 45 years or older who

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

5. Hormone replacement therapy (menopause)

Hormone replacement therapy (menopause) Hormone replacement therapy - Wikipedia Hormone replacement therapy From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from ) This article is about hormone replacement therapy in menopause. For other forms, see . Hormone replacement therapy ( HRT ), also known as menopausal hormone therapy ( MHT ) or postmenopausal hormone therapy ( PHT , PMHT ), is a form of used to treat associated with female . These symptoms can include , , accelerated aging (...) , , decreased , , and . They are in large part related to the diminished levels of that occur during menopause. The main used in HRT for menopausal symptoms are and , among which is the major naturally-occurring female sex hormone and also a used in menopausal hormone therapy. Though both can have symptomatic benefits, progestogen is specifically added to estrogen regimens when the is still present. Unopposed estrogen therapy promotes and can increase the risk of , while progestogen reduces this risk. like

2012 Wikipedia

6. Non-Pharmacologic Treatments for Vasomotor Symptoms Associated with Menopause

Non-Pharmacologic Treatments for Vasomotor Symptoms Associated with Menopause Management Briefs eBrief-no117 -- Enter search terms Button to search HSRD ® Inside VA Budget and Performance Inside the News Room National Observances Special Events » » » » » Management Briefs eBrief-no117 -- Health Services Research & Development Management eBrief no. 117 » Issue 117 October 2016 The report is a product of the VA/HSR&D Evidence Synthesis Program. Evidence Report: Non-Pharmacologic Treatments (...) for Vasomotor Symptoms Associated with Menopause Vasomotor symptoms (VMS), which include hot flashes and night sweats, are the most common symptoms reported during the menopausal transition. VMS symptoms are experienced by as many as 80% of women with a mean age of onset of 51 years, and can last more than seven years. VMS can lead to increased healthcare encounters for symptom relief and reductions in quality of life. The degree to which VMS are bothersome is determined not only by how frequently

2016 Veterans Affairs - R&D

7. Menopausal Symptoms: Comparative Effectiveness of Therapies

Menopausal Symptoms: Comparative Effectiveness of Therapies Menopausal Symptoms: Comparative Effectiveness of Therapies Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 147Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 147 Menopausal Symptoms: Comparative Effectiveness of Therapies Prepared for: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 540 Gaither Road Rockville, MD 20850 www.ahrq.gov Contract No. 290-2007-10058-I Prepared by: Blue Cross and Blue Shield (...) presented in this report. Suggested citation: Grant MD, Marbella A, Wang AT, Pines E, Hoag J, Bonnell C, Ziegler KM, Aronson N. Menopausal Symptoms: Comparative Effectiveness of Therapies. Comparative Effectiveness Review No. 147. (Prepared by Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association Technology Evaluation Center Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-2007- 10058-I.) AHRQ Publication No. 15-EHC005-EF. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; March 2015

2015 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

8. Effects of teriparatide and risedronate on new fractures in post-menopausal women with severe osteoporosis (VERO): a multicentre, double-blind, double-dummy, randomised controlled trial. (PubMed)

Effects of teriparatide and risedronate on new fractures in post-menopausal women with severe osteoporosis (VERO): a multicentre, double-blind, double-dummy, randomised controlled trial. No clinical trials have compared osteoporosis drugs with incident fractures as the primary outcome. We compared the anti-fracture efficacy of teriparatide with risedronate in patients with severe osteoporosis.In this double-blind, double-dummy trial, we enrolled post-menopausal women with at least two moderate (...) in the risedronate group (hazard ratio 0·48, 95% CI 0·32-0·74; p=0·0009). Non-vertebral fragility fractures occurred in 25 (4·0%) patients in the teriparatide group and 38 (6·1%) in the risedronate group (hazard ratio 0·66; 95% CI 0·39-1·10; p=0·10).Among post-menopausal women with severe osteoporosis, the risk of new vertebral and clinical fractures is significantly lower in patients receiving teriparatide than in those receiving risedronate.Lilly.Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

2017 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high

9. Menopause: diagnosis and management

Menopause: diagnosis and management Menopause: diagnosis and management Menopause: diagnosis and management NICE guideline Published: 12 November 2015 nice.org.uk/guidance/ng23 © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When exercising (...) . Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Menopause: diagnosis and management (NG23) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 2 of 30Contents Contents Overview 4 Who is it for? 4 Recommendations 5 1.1 Individualised care 5 1.2 Diagnosis

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

10. Management of menopausal symptoms in women with a history of breast cancer

Management of menopausal symptoms in women with a history of breast cancer Management of menopausal symptoms in women with a history of breast cancer Management of menopausal symptoms in women with a history of breast cancer December 2016 | Incorporates published evidence to November 2015 This guideline includes Evidence Summaries and Recommendations based on available evidence about the effectiveness and safety of different therapies for managing menopausal symptoms in women after breast (...) cancer. The guideline provides health professionals and breast cancer patients with information to support decisions regarding the choice of particular therapies for the management of menopausal symptoms in the context of past or ongoing treatment for breast cancer. © Cancer Australia 2016 Management of menopausal symptoms in women with a history of breast cancer page 1 of 181Table of contents Management of menopausal symptoms in women with a history of breast cancer 1 Background 5 Grading

2017 Cancer Australia

11. Menopause Chapter 3: Clinical Issues

Menopause Chapter 3: Clinical Issues Chapter 3: Clinical Issues | | | | Chapter 3: Clinical Issues > > > DECLINE IN FERTILITY Key Points Fertility declines with increasing age, notably after age 35 years, or approximately 15 years before menopause. Age-related declines in fertility have been confirmed in epidemiologic studies as well as by the observation of declining pregnancy rates with advancing age in cycles of donor insemination and in vitro fertilization (IVF). Advanced maternal age (≥35 (...) . (Level II) In older women undergoing oocyte-donation IVF, single-embryo transfer should be strongly considered because of the risks associated with multiple births. (Level II) Women of advancing age considering donor-oocyte IVF should be counseled about parenting issues and health concerns specific to their age and the age and health of their partner. (Level II) UTERINE BLEEDING Key Points Approximately 90% of women experience 4 to 8 years of menstrual cycle changes before natural menopause, which

2014 The North American Menopause Society

12. The 2017 hormone therapy position statement of The North American Menopause Society

The 2017 hormone therapy position statement of The North American Menopause Society Copyright @ 2017 The North American Menopause Society. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited. POSITION STATEMENT The 2017 hormone therapy position statement of The North American Menopause Society Abstract The2017HormoneTherapyPositionStatementofTheNorthAmericanMenopauseSociety(NAMS)updatesthe 2012HormoneTherapyPositionStatementofTheNorthAmericanMenopauseSocietyandidentifiesfutureresearch needs (...) . An Advisory Panel of clinicians and researchers expert in the field of women’s health and menopause was recruited by NAMS to review the 2012 Position Statement, evaluate new literature, assess the evidence, and reach consensusonrecommendations,usingthelevelofevidencetoidentifythestrengthofrecommendationsandthequality of the evidence. The Panel’s recommendations were reviewed and approved by the NAMS Board of Trustees. Hormone therapy (HT) remains the most effective treatment for vasomotor symptoms (VMS

2017 The North American Menopause Society

13. Intravaginal Laser for Genitourinary Syndrome of Menopause and Stress Urinary Incontinence

Intravaginal Laser for Genitourinary Syndrome of Menopause and Stress Urinary Incontinence No. 358-Intravaginal Laser for Genitourinary Syndrome of Menopause and Stress Urinary Incontinence - Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Volume 40, Issue 4, Pages 503–511 No. 358-Intravaginal Laser for Genitourinary Syndrome of Menopause and Stress Urinary Incontinence x Jens-Erik Walter , MD Montréal, QC x Annick Larochelle (...) , MD Montréal, QC No. 358, April 2018 DOI: To view the full text, please login as a subscribed user or . Click to view the full text on ScienceDirect. Figures Figure Comparative pre- and post-laser vaginal biopsies. Abstract Objective This technical bulletin reviews the evidence relating to risks and benefits of using intravaginal laser technology in the management of genitourinary syndrome of menopause and stress urinary incontinence. Intended Users Gynaecologists, urogynaecologists, urologists

2018 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

14. Denosumab versus bisphosphonates for the treatment of osteoporosis in post-menopausal women

Denosumab versus bisphosphonates for the treatment of osteoporosis in post-menopausal women Denosumab versus bifosfonatos para el tratamiento de la osteoporosis en mujeres post menopáusicas [Denosumab versus bisphosphonates for the treatment of osteoporosis in post-menopausal women] Denosumab versus bifosfonatos para el tratamiento de la osteoporosis en mujeres post menopáusicas [Denosumab versus bisphosphonates for the treatment of osteoporosis in post-menopausal women] Pichon Riviere (...) en mujeres post menopáusicas. [Denosumab versus bisphosphonates for the treatment of osteoporosis in post-menopausal women] Buenos Aires: Institute for Clinical Effectiveness and Health Policy (IECS). Informe de Respuesta Rápida N° 308. 2013 Authors' objectives To assess the available evidence on the efficacy, safety and coverage policy related aspect for denosumab versus bisphosphonates in decreasing the risk of fractures due to post-menopausal osteoporosis. Authors' conclusions

2014 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

15. Menopause (Overview)

Menopause (Overview) Menopause: Practice Essentials, Overview, Physiology Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMjY0MDg4LW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing > Menopause Updated: Jun 06, 2018 Author: PonJola Coney, MD (...) ; Chief Editor: Richard Scott Lucidi, MD, FACOG Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Menopause Overview Practice Essentials Menopause is diagnosed after 12 months of amenorrhea. [ , ] Hormonal changes and clinical symptoms occur over a period leading up to and immediately following menopause; this period is frequently termed the climacteric or perimenopause but is increasingly referred to as the menopausal transition. [ , ] See , a Critical Images slideshow, to help identify

2014 eMedicine.com

16. Efficacy of black cohosh-containing preparations on menopausal symptoms: a meta-analysis

Efficacy of black cohosh-containing preparations on menopausal symptoms: a meta-analysis Efficacy of black cohosh-containing preparations on menopausal symptoms: a meta-analysis Efficacy of black cohosh-containing preparations on menopausal symptoms: a meta-analysis Shams T, Setia MS, Hemmings R, McCusker J, Sewitch M, Ciampi A CRD summary This review concluded that black cohosh may reduce the frequency of vasomotor symptoms associated with menopause and that more studies were warranted on its (...) effectiveness and safety. The authors' conclusions appeared to reflect the evidence, but given the likelihood of biases in identifying relevant studies it was difficult to verify these conclusions. Authors' objectives To investigate the efficacy of preparations containing black cohosh on reduction of vasomotor symptoms associated with menopause. Searching English-language studies were identified through a search of PubMed, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library to January 2008. Search terms were reported

2010 DARE.

17. Vegans report less bothersome vasomotor and physical menopausal symptoms than omnivores. (PubMed)

Vegans report less bothersome vasomotor and physical menopausal symptoms than omnivores. Lifestyle modifications that may reduce menopausal symptoms have generated much interest. The vegetarian diet has been associated with a lower risk of chronic disease as well as a more healthy hormonal milieu. Our objective in this cross-sectional study was to survey peri- and postmenopausal women to investigate menopausal symptoms and dietary pattern.Survey distribution in 2015-2016 was aimed at female (...) vegans, vegetarians, and omnivores between the ages of 45 and 80 years, who were active on senior and vegetarian social networking websites and at vegan restaurants and events.We investigated vasomotor and physical symptoms as measured by the Menopause-specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (MENQOL) and dietary pattern classified by animal protein intakes reported in response to food frequency questions.Out of 754 participants who completed the survey, 604 reported they were perimenopausal (n = 121

2018 Maturitas

18. Everything I needed to know about the menopause… No One Told Me

Everything I needed to know about the menopause… No One Told Me Everything I needed to know about the menopause... No One Told Me - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By March 11, 2015 // Today’s guest blog comes from Oxford academic June Girvin, who shares her experiences of the menopause, the taboo and the information gap. Today is NHS Change Day and June, along with the rest of our guest bloggers in this special series on the menopause, is backing Menopause UK’s grassroots campaign (...) for Change Day to #changethechange. You can read more about that here. It’s Menopause Week on Evidently Cochrane. I wasn’t sure whether that required an exclamation mark, but decided, all things considered, that it didn’t. My contribution to this week of menopause related blogs is a personal one – or a phenomenological one as this is a blog for ‘Evidently Cochrane’ – and I think my lived experience of the ‘last taboo’ or the ‘Big M’ (thankfully one rarely hears it called ‘THE CHANGE’ anymore with all its

2015 Evidently Cochrane

19. No sex please, we’re menopausal!

No sex please, we’re menopausal! No sex please, we're menopausal! - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By March 13, 2015 // In today’s guest blog, Elaine Miller, a physiotherapist who also does a stand-up comedy show about pelvic floors, tackles sex and the menopause. I have a faded post-it note on my office wall that says “what most people need is a really good listening to”. It’s sound advice for life, but, particularly useful whenever a patient brings up a sexual function issue in clinic (...) . Menopausal women often experience changes in how they think about their bodies and sexuality. Many have sad feelings about the loss of fertility and the body of their youth. Of course, some women relish not fearing unwanted pregnancy and finally feeling comfortable in their own skin. Elaine Miller, tackling the taboo with humour and reliable information. Sexuality is not just about having sex, and sex is about more than penetration. A lack of intimacy, in whatever form, negatively impacts our wellbeing

2015 Evidently Cochrane

20. Menopause Chapter 4: Disease Risk

Menopause Chapter 4: Disease Risk Chapter 4: Disease Risk | | | | Chapter 4: Disease Risk > > > CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH Key Points Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in women worldwide. Major risk factors for CVD in women include age, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus (DM), family history of premature CVD, smoking, sedentary lifestyle, and poor diet. Novel risk factors for CVD include a history of a pregnancy complicated by preeclampsia, gestational diabetes (...) , or hypertension. Hormonal changes associated with menopause can result in an accelerated increase in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in the year following menopause. Recommendations for Clinical Care All women should be encouraged to reduce their risk for CVD, including heart attack and stroke, by engaging in regular exercise, consuming a healthy diet, achieving a normal body weight, and not smoking. Healthcare providers should evaluate all women for CVD risk using the American College

2014 The North American Menopause Society