Latest & greatest articles for menopause

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Top results for menopause

161. Cost-utility of adjuvant hormone therapies with aromatase inhibitors in post-menopausal women with breast cancer: upfront anastrozole, sequential tamoxifen-exemestane and extended tamoxifen-letrozole

Cost-utility of adjuvant hormone therapies with aromatase inhibitors in post-menopausal women with breast cancer: upfront anastrozole, sequential tamoxifen-exemestane and extended tamoxifen-letrozole Cost-utility of adjuvant hormone therapies with aromatase inhibitors in post-menopausal women with breast cancer: upfront anastrozole, sequential tamoxifen-exemestane and extended tamoxifen-letrozole Cost-utility of adjuvant hormone therapies with aromatase inhibitors in post-menopausal women with (...) , the incremental cost per QALY gained over TAM alone exceeded the EUR 30,000 threshold). The model was successfully validated. Authors' conclusions All three aromatase inhibitor (AI) strategies were cost-effective in comparison with tamoxifen (TAM) alone as adjuvant treatment of post-menopausal women with breast cancer (BC). Sequential TAM-AI was the preferred strategy among the three adjuvant hormonal treatments. CRD COMMENTARY - Selection of comparators The rationale for the choice of the comparators

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2007

163. Menopausal hormone therapy and risk of ovarian cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis

Menopausal hormone therapy and risk of ovarian cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis Menopausal hormone therapy and risk of ovarian cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis Menopausal hormone therapy and risk of ovarian cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis Greiser C M, Greiser E M, Doren M CRD summary The authors concluded that oestrogen therapy and oestrogen/progestin therapy were risk factors for ovarian cancer. Generally, this was a well-conducted review, but given the lack (...) of information on the quality of the studies and concerns for pooling diverse data, the reliability of the conclusion is uncertain. Authors' objectives To assess the impact of menopausal hormone therapy on the risk of ovarian cancer. Searching MEDLINE (January 1966 to April 2006), CANCERLIT, EMBASE, SCOPUS and the Cochrane Library were searched. Search terms were provided. Reference lists of relevant publications were also checked. Editorials, supplements, books and relevant conference proceedings (2002

DARE.2007

164. Postmenopausal hormone therapy and risk of cardiovascular disease by age and years since menopause.

Postmenopausal hormone therapy and risk of cardiovascular disease by age and years since menopause. 17405972 2007 04 04 2007 04 06 2016 10 17 1538-3598 297 13 2007 Apr 04 JAMA JAMA Postmenopausal hormone therapy and risk of cardiovascular disease by age and years since menopause. 1465-77 The timing of initiation of hormone therapy may influence its effect on cardiovascular disease. To explore whether the effects of hormone therapy on risk of cardiovascular disease vary by age or years since (...) menopause began. Secondary analysis of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) randomized controlled trials of hormone therapy in which 10,739 postmenopausal women who had undergone a hysterectomy were randomized to conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) or placebo and 16,608 postmenopausal women who had not had a hysterectomy were randomized to CEE plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (CEE + MPA) or placebo. Women aged 50 to 79 years were recruited to the study from 40 US clinical centers between September 1993

JAMA2007

165. Main morbidities recorded in the women's international study of long duration oestrogen after menopause (WISDOM): a randomised controlled trial of hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women.

Main morbidities recorded in the women's international study of long duration oestrogen after menopause (WISDOM): a randomised controlled trial of hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women. 17626056 2007 08 03 2007 08 13 2017 02 20 1756-1833 335 7613 2007 Aug 04 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Main morbidities recorded in the women's international study of long duration oestrogen after menopause (WISDOM): a randomised controlled trial of hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal (...) differences in numbers of breast or other cancers (22 v 25, hazard ratio 0.88 (0.49 to 1.56)), cerebrovascular events (14 v 19, 0.73 (0.37 to 1.46)), fractures (40 v 58, 0.69 (0.46 to 1.03)), and overall deaths (8 v 5, 1.60 (0.52 to 4.89)). Comparison of combined hormone therapy (n=815) versus oestrogen therapy (n=826) outcomes revealed no significant differences. Hormone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular and thromboembolic risk when started many years after the menopause. The results

BMJ2007 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

166. Review: plant based oestrogens do not relieve hot flushes or other menopausal symptoms

Review: plant based oestrogens do not relieve hot flushes or other menopausal symptoms Review: plant based oestrogens do not relieve hot flushes or other menopausal symptoms | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in via your Society Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword (...) Search for this keyword Main menu Log in via your Society Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: plant based oestrogens do not relieve hot flushes or other menopausal symptoms Article Text Treatment Review: plant based oestrogens do not relieve hot flushes or other menopausal symptoms Free Cathy R Kessenich , ARNP, DSN Statistics from Altmetric.com No Altmetric data

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2006

167. Nonhormonal therapies for menopausal hot flashes: systematic review and meta-analysis

Nonhormonal therapies for menopausal hot flashes: systematic review and meta-analysis Nonhormonal therapies for menopausal hot flashes: systematic review and meta-analysis Nonhormonal therapies for menopausal hot flashes: systematic review and meta-analysis Nelson H D, Vesco K K, Haney E, Fu R, Nedrow A, Miller J, Nicolaidis C, Walker M, Humphrey L CRD summary This review concluded that selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, serotonin norepinephrine re-uptake inhibitors, clonidine (...) and gabapentin are less efficacious than oestrogen therapies, and may be most useful for highly symptomatic women unable to take oestrogen. Given the limitations of the review, and the fact that none of the included studies directly compared hormonal and nonhormonal interventions, caution should be applied when considering the conclusions. Authors' objectives To assess the efficacy and adverse effects of nonhormonal therapies for menopausal hot flushes. Searching Relevant trials from a previous review (see

DARE.2006

168. Complementary and alternative therapies for the management of menopause-related symptoms: a systematic evidence review

Complementary and alternative therapies for the management of menopause-related symptoms: a systematic evidence review Complementary and alternative therapies for the management of menopause-related symptoms: a systematic evidence review Complementary and alternative therapies for the management of menopause-related symptoms: a systematic evidence review Nedrow A, Miller J, Walker M, Nygren P, Huffman L H, Nelson H D CRD summary This review assessed randomised evidence for the use (...) of complementary and alternative therapies in the treatment of menopausal symptoms. The review included a wide range of interventions but concluded that there was insufficient evidence to demonstrate that any of the included therapies was effective. Given concerns about aspects of the review methods, it is not clear how reliable these conclusions are. Authors' objectives To evaluate the efficacy of complementary and alternative therapies for the management of menopausal symptoms. Searching MEDLINE, PsycINFO

DARE.2006

169. Menopausal hormone therapy (HT) in patients with breast cancer

Menopausal hormone therapy (HT) in patients with breast cancer Menopausal hormone therapy (HT) in patients with breast cancer Menopausal hormone therapy (HT) in patients with breast cancer Batur P, Blixen C E, Moore H C, Thacker H L, Xu M CRD summary This review examined the effects of menopausal hormone therapy on cancer reoccurrence, cancer mortality and overall mortality in patients with breast cancer. The authors concluded that hormone therapy is not associated with an increased incidence (...) of these outcomes. However, the reliability of this conclusion is limited by combining the results from studies of varying design. Authors' objectives To assess the effect of menopausal hormone therapy (HT) on cancer reoccurrence, cancer-related mortality and overall mortality in patients with a diagnosis of breast cancer. Searching MEDLINE, CINAHL and HealthSTAR were searched from 1967 to 2001; the search terms were given. In addition, existing reviews were used to identify references and conference

DARE.2006

170. Isoflavone therapy for menopausal flushes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Isoflavone therapy for menopausal flushes: a systematic review and meta-analysis Isoflavone therapy for menopausal flushes: a systematic review and meta-analysis Isoflavone therapy for menopausal flushes: a systematic review and meta-analysis Howes L G, Howes J B, Knight D C CRD summary The authors concluded that isoflavone supplementation may result in a slight to modest reduction in the number of daily menopausal flushes. Poor reporting of review methods, the lack of an assessment of study (...) quality, and differences between the studies make it difficult to comment on the reliability of the authors’ conclusions. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effects of isoflavone supplementation on the number of daily menopausal flushes. Searching MEDLINE, PREMEDLINE, PubMed and the Cochrane CENTRAL Register were searched for published studies; the search terms were stated but the search dates were not. In addition, the references of identified studies and recent reviews were screened. Foreign

DARE.2006

171. Letrozole versus human menopausal gonadotrophin in women undergoing intrauterine insemination

Letrozole versus human menopausal gonadotrophin in women undergoing intrauterine insemination Letrozole versus human menopausal gonadotrophin in women undergoing intrauterine insemination Letrozole versus human menopausal gonadotrophin in women undergoing intrauterine insemination Baysoy A, Serdaroglu H, Jamal H, Karatekeli E, Ozornek H, Attar E Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief (...) summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The use of letrozole, one of a new class of drugs known as aromatase inhibitors, in women undergoing intrauterine insemination (IUI). This intervention was compared with the use of human menopausal gonadotrophin (HMG). Women undergoing ovarian stimulation and IUI, for whom no ovarian cyst was seen on the sonogram, were given

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2006

172. Recommendations for aromatase inhibitors as adjuvant endocrine therapy for post-menopausal women with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer

Recommendations for aromatase inhibitors as adjuvant endocrine therapy for post-menopausal women with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer Cancer Australia | A national government agency working to reduce the impact of cancer on all Australians ") //--> ") //--> Search form Search News Featured Sites Featured Video Visit our channel Video of Introduction to the Statement View the video transcript ( ) Cancer types A - Z list of cancer types In Focus Copyright © 2017 - Cancer Australia

National Breast and Ovarian Cancer Centre2006

173. Recommendations for Aromatase inhibitors as adjuvant endocrine therapy for post-menopausal women with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer

Recommendations for Aromatase inhibitors as adjuvant endocrine therapy for post-menopausal women with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer

Cancer Australia2006

175. The menopausal transition increases the risk of depressive symptoms and depression diagnosis in women without a history of depression

The menopausal transition increases the risk of depressive symptoms and depression diagnosis in women without a history of depression The menopausal transition increases the risk of depressive symptoms and depression diagnosis in women without a history of depression | Evidence-Based Mental Health This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts (...) Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here The menopausal transition increases the risk of depressive symptoms and depression diagnosis in women without a history of depression Article Text Aetiology The menopausal transition increases the risk of depressive symptoms

Evidence-Based Mental Health2006

176. Entering menopause increases the risk of first episode depression

Entering menopause increases the risk of first episode depression Entering menopause increases the risk of first episode depression | Evidence-Based Mental Health This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username (...) and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Entering menopause increases the risk of first episode depression Article Text Aetiology Entering menopause increases the risk of first episode depression Statistics from Altmetric.com No Altmetric data available for this article. Request permissions If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance

Evidence-Based Mental Health2006

177. Depression increases in women during early to late menopause but decreases after menopause

Depression increases in women during early to late menopause but decreases after menopause Depression increases in women during early to late menopause but decreases after menopause | Evidence-Based Mental Health This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search (...) for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Depression increases in women during early to late menopause but decreases after menopause Article Text Aetiology Depression increases in women during early to late menopause but decreases after menopause Free Hayden B Bosworth , PhD Statistics from Altmetric.com No Altmetric data available for this article. Freeman EW

Evidence-Based Mental Health2005

178. Menopausal hormone therapy and risk of breast cancer: a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies and randomized controlled trials

Menopausal hormone therapy and risk of breast cancer: a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies and randomized controlled trials Menopausal hormone therapy and risk of breast cancer: a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies and randomized controlled trials Menopausal hormone therapy and risk of breast cancer: a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies and randomized controlled trials Greiser C M, Greiser E M, Doren M CRD summary This review assessed the association between menopausal hormone (...) Publications of Related Interest). Study selection Study designs of evaluations included in the review Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cohort studies and case-control studies were eligible for inclusion. The studies had to report the dates over which the study was conducted. Specific interventions included in the review Studies of unopposed oestrogen therapy (ET), oestrogen-progestin therapy (EPT), or all menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) combined (including unspecified or unknown preparations), were

DARE.2005

179. Does scientific evidence support the use of non-prescription supplements for treatment of acute menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes?

Does scientific evidence support the use of non-prescription supplements for treatment of acute menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes? Does scientific evidence support the use of non-prescription supplements for treatment of acute menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes? Does scientific evidence support the use of non-prescription supplements for treatment of acute menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes? Hanna K, Day A, O'Neill S, Patterson C, Lyons-Wall P CRD summary This review assessed (...) non-prescription supplements for menopausal symptoms, particularly hot flushes. The authors concluded that the limited evidence about red clover, soy, sage and black cohosh suggests that more research is required. Given the limitations of the review and the paucity of evidence for some interventions, the authors' conservative conclusions and suggestions for further research seem appropriate. Authors' objectives To evaluate non-prescription supplements (NPS) for the treatment of menopausal symptoms

DARE.2005

180. Aromatase inhibitors as adjuvant therapy for post-menopausal women with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer

Aromatase inhibitors as adjuvant therapy for post-menopausal women with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer Cancer Australia | A national government agency working to reduce the impact of cancer on all Australians ") //--> ") //--> Search form Search News Featured Sites Featured Video Visit our channel Video of Introduction to the Statement View the video transcript ( ) Cancer types A - Z list of cancer types In Focus Copyright © 2017 - Cancer Australia

National Breast and Ovarian Cancer Centre2005