Latest & greatest articles for menopause

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Top results for menopause

81. Aromatherapy for menopausal symptoms: protocol of a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Aromatherapy for menopausal symptoms: protocol of a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence

2017 PROSPERO

82. Appraisal of clinical practice guidelines of menopause and menopause management using AGREE II instrument: a systematic review

Appraisal of clinical practice guidelines of menopause and menopause management using AGREE II instrument: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne

2017 PROSPERO

83. Which information sources are consulted by menopausal women in Africa? A systematic review

Which information sources are consulted by menopausal women in Africa? A systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address

2017 PROSPERO

84. The relationship between menopause and illness course in bipolar disorder: a systematic review

The relationship between menopause and illness course in bipolar disorder: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address

2017 PROSPERO

85. Menopause

Menopause Menopause - NICE CKS Share Menopause: Summary Menopause is a biological stage in a woman's life when menstruation ceases permanently due to the loss of ovarian follicular activity. It occurs with the final menstrual period and is usually diagnosed clinically after 12 months of amenorrhoea. In the UK, the mean age of the natural menopause is 51 years, although this can vary between different ethnic groups. Perimenopause is the period before the menopause when the endocrinological (...) , biological, and clinical features of approaching menopause commence. It is characterized by irregular cycles of ovulation and menstruation and ends 12 months after the last menstrual period. Postmenopause is the time after a woman has not had a period for 12 consecutive months. Premature menopause is usually defined as menopause occurring before the age of 40 years. Alterations in hormonal levels result in menopausal symptoms. Vasomotor symptoms (hot flushes and night sweats) are the most commonly

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

86. Menopause and hormone therapy

Menopause and hormone therapy Menopause and hormone therapy Approved by the Danish Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology March, 20 – 2017 Based on the NICE guideline Menopause and hormone therapy 1 Summary of clinical recommendations Hormone therapy can be considered for menopause related symptoms after thorough advice on the benefits and risks of treatment. Treat with the lowest possible dose in the shortest possible time, and preferably with dermal application. A Postmenopausal women suffering (...) from moderate to severe hot flushes are recommended to try lifestyle changes for a 3-month period and should undergo investigation of the risk factors of cardiovascular disease. If the lifestyle changes do not remedy the symptoms, one should treat based on whether the findings of the investigation into cardiovascular disease suggest low ( 10%) risk. Women at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease are advised against hormone therapy. Women that started menopause less than 10 years ago

2017 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology

87. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) for Menopausal Symptoms

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) for Menopausal Symptoms BRITISH MENOPAUSE SOCIETY T ool for clinicians Information for GPs and other health professionals 1 of 2 Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) for Menopausal Symptoms Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) for Menopausal Symptoms The Menopause Guideline (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, NICE 2015; 1.3.3) recommends that GPs and health professionals give information and advice to menopausal women about cognitive behaviour therapy (...) . Anxiety and stress – NICE (201 5) 1 recommends CBT as a treatment option for anxiety experienced by women during the menopause transition and post menopause. Women can feel anxious at this time, due to unpredictable hot flushes and social embarrassment, which can lead to avoidance of social and other activities. Hot flushes can be associated with palpitations. Bearing these issues in mind CBT can be adapted from protocols for social and general anxiety. Depressed mood – NICE (201 5) recommends CBT

2017 British Menopause Society

88. Non-hormonal-based treatments for menopausal symptoms

Non-hormonal-based treatments for menopausal symptoms Non-hormonal-based treatments for menopausal symptoms | British Menopause Society Search for: Summary consensus statement Non-hormonal-based treatments for menopausal symptoms Non-hormonal-based treatments for menopausal symptoms 2018-04-13T10:06:04+01:00 Summary practice points As clinicians we must be familiar with alternative therapies, to help inform and guide women as to which options are most likely to be beneficial to them. Few (...) complementary and alternative treatment options have proven evidence of effectiveness, but although many options do not stand up to scrutiny from a robust and evidence based perspective there will be individual women who will benefit from some of these treatments. Placebo effect is not inconsiderable and in menopausal studies will play a part in individual experience and reported benefits The full statement, scientific papers, charts, presentations etc are available in the . If you are not a member you can

2017 British Menopause Society

89. Cardiotoxicity of Aromatase Inhibitors and Tamoxifen in Post-Menopausal Women with Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cardiotoxicity of Aromatase Inhibitors and Tamoxifen in Post-Menopausal Women with Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) have been associated with cardiovascular disease in adjuvant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing these drugs to tamoxifen. However, it is unclear whether this risk is real or due to cardioprotective effects of tamoxifen. To address this question, we conducted a systematic review and meta

2016 Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology

90. Non-Pharmacologic Treatments for Vasomotor Symptoms Associated with Menopause

Non-Pharmacologic Treatments for Vasomotor Symptoms Associated with Menopause Management Briefs eBrief-no117 -- Enter search terms Button to search HSRD ® Inside VA Budget and Performance Inside the News Room National Observances Special Events » » » » » Management Briefs eBrief-no117 -- Health Services Research & Development Management eBrief no. 117 » Issue 117 October 2016 The report is a product of the VA/HSR&D Evidence Synthesis Program. Evidence Report: Non-Pharmacologic Treatments (...) for Vasomotor Symptoms Associated with Menopause Vasomotor symptoms (VMS), which include hot flashes and night sweats, are the most common symptoms reported during the menopausal transition. VMS symptoms are experienced by as many as 80% of women with a mean age of onset of 51 years, and can last more than seven years. VMS can lead to increased healthcare encounters for symptom relief and reductions in quality of life. The degree to which VMS are bothersome is determined not only by how frequently

2016 Veterans Affairs - R&D

91. Association of Age at Onset of Menopause and Time Since Onset of Menopause With Cardiovascular Outcomes, Intermediate Vascular Traits, and All-Cause Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Association of Age at Onset of Menopause and Time Since Onset of Menopause With Cardiovascular Outcomes, Intermediate Vascular Traits, and All-Cause Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. As many as 10% of women experience natural menopause by the age of 45 years. If confirmed, an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality associated with premature and early-onset menopause could be an important factor affecting risk of disease and mortality among middle (...) -aged and older women.To systematically review and meta-analyze studies evaluating the effect of age at onset of menopause and duration since onset of menopause on intermediate CVD end points, CVD outcomes, and all-cause mortality.Medical databases (ie, Medline, EMBASE, and Web of Science) until March 2015.Studies (ie, observational cohort, case-control, or cross-sectional) that assessed age at onset of menopause and/or time since onset of menopause as exposures as well as risk of cardiovascular

2016 JAMA cardiology

92. Canadian Consensus on Female Nutrition: Adolescence, Reproduction, Menopause, and Beyond

Canadian Consensus on Female Nutrition: Adolescence, Reproduction, Menopause, and Beyond Canadian Consensus on Female Nutrition: Adolescence, Reproduction, Menopause, and Beyond - Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Volume 38, Issue 6, Pages 508–554.e18 To read this article in full, please review your options for gaining access at the bottom of the page. Canadian Consensus on Female Nutrition: Adolescence (...) , Reproduction, Menopause, and Beyond Nutrition Working Group x Deborah L. O'Connor , PhD, RD (Principal Author) Toronto ON x Jennifer Blake , MD (Principal Author) Ottawa ON x Rhonda Bell , PhD (Principal Author) Edmonton AB x Angela Bowen , PhD, RN (Principal Author) Saskatoon SK x Jeannie Callum , MD (Principal Author) Toronto ON x Shanna Fenton , MD (Principal Author) Saskatoon SK x Katherine Gray-Donald , PhD (Principal Author) Montreal QC x Melissa Rossiter , PhD, RD (Principal Author) Charlottetown

2016 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

93. Cognitive effects of estradiol after menopause: A randomized trial of the timing hypothesis Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cognitive effects of estradiol after menopause: A randomized trial of the timing hypothesis To test the hypothesis that effects of estrogen-containing hormone therapy on cognitive abilities differ between postmenopausal women near to, and further from, menopause.In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, healthy women within 6 years of menopause or 10+ years after menopause were randomly assigned to oral 17β-estradiol 1 mg/d or placebo. Women with a uterus received cyclic (...) in composite scores (-0.06, 95% confidence interval -0.22 to 0.09) was not significant (2-tailed p = 0.33). Differences were similar in early and late postmenopause groups (2-tailed interaction p = 0.88). Interactions between postmenopause groups and differences between treatment groups were not significant for executive functions or global cognition.Estradiol initiated within 6 years of menopause does not affect verbal memory, executive functions, or global cognition differently than therapy begun 10

2016 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

94. Use of Plant-Based Therapies and Menopausal Symptoms: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Use of Plant-Based Therapies and Menopausal Symptoms: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Between 40% and 50% of women in Western countries use complementary therapies to manage menopausal symptoms.To determine the association of plant-based therapies with menopausal symptoms, including hot flashes, night sweats, and vaginal dryness.The electronic databases Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central were systematically searched to identify eligible studies published before March 27, 2016 (...) that composite and specific phytoestrogen supplementations were associated with modest reductions in the frequency of hot flashes and vaginal dryness but no significant reduction in night sweats. However, because of general suboptimal quality and the heterogeneous nature of the current evidence, further rigorous studies are needed to determine the association of plant-based and natural therapies with menopausal health.

2016 JAMA

95. Chinese herbal medicine for menopausal symptoms. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Chinese herbal medicine for menopausal symptoms. Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) usage is expected to increase as women suffering from menopausal symptoms are seeking alternative therapy due to concerns from the adverse effects (AEs) associated with hormone therapy (HT). Scientific evidence for their effectiveness and safety is needed.To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of CHM in the treatment of menopausal symptoms.We searched the Gynaecology and Fertility Group's Specialised Register (...) trials (RCTs) comparing the effectiveness of CHM with placebo, HT, pharmaceutical drugs, acupuncture, or another CHM formula in women over 18 years of age, and suffering from menopausal symptoms.Two review authors independently assessed 864 studies for eligibility. Data extractions were performed by them with disagreements resolved through group discussion and clarification of data or direct contact with the study authors. Data analyses were performed in accordance with Cochrane Collaboration

2016 Cochrane

96. Menopause Management - Getting Clinical Care Back on Track. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Menopause Management - Getting Clinical Care Back on Track. 26962899 2016 03 15 2018 12 02 1533-4406 374 9 2016 Mar 03 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Menopause Management--Getting Clinical Care Back on Track. 803-6 10.1056/NEJMp1514242 Manson JoAnn E JE From the Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (J.E.M.); and the University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville (A.M.K.). Kaunitz Andrew M AM From the Department (...) of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (J.E.M.); and the University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville (A.M.K.). eng Journal Article United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 AIM IM Hormone Replacement Therapy adverse effects statistics & numerical data Humans Internal Medicine education Internship and Residency Menopause drug effects Middle Aged Risk United States Women's Health 2016 3 11 6 0 2016 3 11 6 0 2016 3 16 6 0 ppublish 26962899 10.1056

2016 NEJM

97. Acupuncture for Menopausal Hot Flashes: A Randomized Trial. (Abstract)

Acupuncture for Menopausal Hot Flashes: A Randomized Trial. Hot flashes (HFs) affect up to 75% of menopausal women and pose a considerable health and financial burden. Evidence of acupuncture efficacy as an HF treatment is conflicting.To assess the efficacy of Chinese medicine acupuncture against sham acupuncture for menopausal HFs.Stratified, blind (participants, outcome assessors, and investigators, but not treating acupuncturists), parallel, randomized, sham-controlled trial with equal (...) allocation. (Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12611000393954).Community in Australia.Women older than 40 years in the late menopausal transition or postmenopause with at least 7 moderate HFs daily, meeting criteria for Chinese medicine diagnosis of kidney yin deficiency.10 treatments over 8 weeks of either standardized Chinese medicine needle acupuncture designed to treat kidney yin deficiency or noninsertive sham acupuncture.The primary outcome was HF score at the end of treatment

2016 Annals of Internal Medicine Controlled trial quality: predicted high

98. Managing menopausal symptoms after breast cancer - a guide for women

Managing menopausal symptoms after breast cancer - a guide for women A guide for women Managing menopausal symptoms after breast cancerManaging menopausal symptoms after breast cancer A guide for womenBreast cancer and early menopause — a guide for younger women First edition published in 2008 by: National Breast and Ovarian Cancer Centre*. Managing menopausal symptoms after breast cancer Second edition published in 2016 by Cancer Australia Locked Bag 3, Strawberry Hills NSW 2012 Tel: 61 2 9357 (...) 9400 Fax: 61 2 9357 9477 canceraustralia.gov.au © Cancer Australia 2016 ISBN Print: 978-1-74127-252-9 Online: 978-1-74127-253-6 CIP: 616.99449 Recommended citation: Cancer Australia. Managing menopausal symptoms after breast cancer. Cancer Australia, Surry Hills, NSW, 2012. Managing menopausal symptoms after breast cancer, can be downloaded or ordered from the Cancer Australia website: canceraustralia.gov.au/resources Copyright statements Paper-based publications This work is copyright. You may

2016 Cancer Australia

99. Nonpharmacologic treatments for menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms

Nonpharmacologic treatments for menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing and effect

2016 PROSPERO

100. Menopause treated with homeopathy: a systematic review

Menopause treated with homeopathy: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing and effect measures Timing

2016 PROSPERO