Latest & greatest articles for menopause

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Top results for menopause

181. Potential cost-effective use of spine radiographs to detect vertebral deformity and select osteopenic post-menopausal women for amino-bisphosphonate therapy

Potential cost-effective use of spine radiographs to detect vertebral deformity and select osteopenic post-menopausal women for amino-bisphosphonate therapy Potential cost-effective use of spine radiographs to detect vertebral deformity and select osteopenic post-menopausal women for amino-bisphosphonate therapy Potential cost-effective use of spine radiographs to detect vertebral deformity and select osteopenic post-menopausal women for amino-bisphosphonate therapy Schousboe J T, Ensrud K E (...) . Source of funding Supported by Hologic Inc., Pfizer Inc., and Eli Lilly and Co. Bibliographic details Schousboe J T, Ensrud K E, Nyman J A, Kane R L, Melton L J. Potential cost-effective use of spine radiographs to detect vertebral deformity and select osteopenic post-menopausal women for amino-bisphosphonate therapy. Osteoporosis International 2005; 16(12): 1883-1893 PubMedID DOI Other publications of related interest Cranney A, Wells G, Willan A, et al. Meta-analyses of therapies for postmenopausal

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2005

182. Management of menopause-related symptoms

Management of menopause-related symptoms Management of menopause-related symptoms Management of menopause-related symptoms Nelson HD, Haney E, Humphrey L, Miller J, Nedrow A, Nicolaidis C, Vesco K, Walker M, Bougatsos C, Nygren P Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Nelson HD, Haney E, Humphrey L, Miller J, Nedrow A, Nicolaidis (...) C, Vesco K, Walker M, Bougatsos C, Nygren P. Management of menopause-related symptoms. Rockville: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Evidence Report/Technology Assessment No. 120. 2005 Authors' objectives This report aims to describe the evidence about symptoms associated with menopause, factors that influence them, benefits and adverse effects of therapies, factors that influence therapies, and future research needs. Authors' conclusions Vasomotor symptoms and vaginal dryness

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2005

184. Paroxetine controlled release was effective and tolerable for treating menopausal hot flash symptoms in women

Paroxetine controlled release was effective and tolerable for treating menopausal hot flash symptoms in women Paroxetine controlled release was effective and tolerable for treating menopausal hot flash symptoms in women | Evidence-Based Medicine This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search (...) for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Paroxetine controlled release was effective and tolerable for treating menopausal hot flash symptoms in women Article Text Therapeutics Paroxetine controlled release was effective and tolerable for treating menopausal hot flash symptoms in women Free Pamela Lotke , MD, MPH , Francisco Garcia , MD

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2005

185. Menopause and hypothalamic-pituitary sensitivity to estrogen.

Menopause and hypothalamic-pituitary sensitivity to estrogen. CONTEXT: The onset of human menopause is thought to be caused solely by ovarian failure and oocyte depletion. However, clinical symptoms and certain recent data in perimenopausal women suggest central nervous system involvement. OBJECTIVE: To determine if modifications of hypothalamic-pituitary response to estrogen feedback mechanisms occur in older reproductive-age women as a mechanism of the onset of menopause. DESIGN, SETTING (...) , AND PARTICIPANTS: The Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) is a multiethnic observational cohort study of the menopausal transition in 3302 women at 7 US sites. Of the subcohort of 840 women who participated in the Daily Hormone Study between 1997 and 1999, 680 women had evidence of luteal activity. The remaining 160 women (19%) did not have luteal activity and are the subject of this report. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Daily urinary hormone levels of estrogen and progesterone metabolites, luteinizing

JAMA2004

186. Oestrogen plus progestin doubles the risk of dementia in post-menopausal women

Oestrogen plus progestin doubles the risk of dementia in post-menopausal women Oestrogen plus progestin doubles the risk of dementia in post-menopausal women | Evidence-Based Mental Health This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log (...) in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Oestrogen plus progestin doubles the risk of dementia in post-menopausal women Article Text Therapeutics Oestrogen plus progestin doubles the risk of dementia in post-menopausal women Free Barbara B Sherwin , PhD , Professor , James McGill Statistics from Altmetric.com No Altmetric data available for this article. ( 2003 ) JAMA 289 , 2651

Evidence-Based Mental Health2004

187. Evaluation of abnormal uterine bleeding: comparison of three outpatient procedures within cohorts defined by age and menopausal status

Evaluation of abnormal uterine bleeding: comparison of three outpatient procedures within cohorts defined by age and menopausal status Evaluation of abnormal uterine bleeding: comparison of three outpatient procedures within cohorts defined by age and menopausal status Journals Library An error has occurred in processing the XML document An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could

NIHR HTA programme2004

188. Review: most herbal treatments have no benefit for menopausal symptoms

Review: most herbal treatments have no benefit for menopausal symptoms Review: most herbal treatments have no benefit for menopausal symptoms | Evidence-Based Medicine This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username (...) and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: most herbal treatments have no benefit for menopausal symptoms Article Text Therapeutics Review: most herbal treatments have no benefit for menopausal symptoms Free Angela M Cheung , MD, PhD , Rishma Walji , BSc, ND Statistics from Altmetric.com No Altmetric data available for this article. ( 2002 ) Ann Intern Med 137 , 805 . Kronenberg F, Fugh-Berman

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2004

189. Phytoestrogens for treatment of menopausal symptoms: a systematic review

Phytoestrogens for treatment of menopausal symptoms: a systematic review Phytoestrogens for treatment of menopausal symptoms: a systematic review Phytoestrogens for treatment of menopausal symptoms: a systematic review Krebs E E, Ensrud K E, MacDonald R, Wilt T J CRD summary This review assessed the efficacy and tolerability of phytoestrogens for treating menopausal symptoms. The authors concluded that the available evidence suggests that phytoestrogens do not improve hot flushes or other (...) menopausal symptoms, although they are well tolerated. This was generally a well-conducted and clearly presented review, and the authors' conclusions regarding efficacy are likely to be robust. Authors' objectives To assess the efficacy and tolerability of phytoestrogens for treating menopausal symptoms. Searching MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library were searched from 1966 to March 2004; the keywords were reported. The reference lists in identified reports and reviews were checked. The journals Menopause

DARE.2004

190. Evaluation of abnormal uterine bleeding: comparison of three outpatient procedures within cohorts defined by age and menopausal status

Evaluation of abnormal uterine bleeding: comparison of three outpatient procedures within cohorts defined by age and menopausal status Evaluation of abnormal uterine bleeding: comparison of three outpatient procedures within cohorts defined by age and menopausal status Evaluation of abnormal uterine bleeding: comparison of three outpatient procedures within cohorts defined by age and menopausal status Critchley H O D, Warner P, Lee A J, Brechin S, Guise J, Graham B Record Status (...) This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Critchley H O D, Warner P, Lee A J, Brechin S, Guise J, Graham B. Evaluation of abnormal uterine bleeding: comparison of three outpatient procedures within cohorts defined by age and menopausal status. Health Technology Assessment 2004; 8(34): 1-154 Authors' objectives This study aimed to compare three outpatient methods

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2004

192. Bone loss and bone size after menopause.

Bone loss and bone size after menopause. BACKGROUND: Bone loss increases after menopause. However, bone strength also depends on structural characteristics such as bone size. Whether bone size increases as a result of periosteal apposition and whether a strength index accounting for both bone density and bone size might predict the risk of fracture better than bone density alone are unclear. METHODS: Bone mass and the skeletal structure of the distal radius were evaluated by single-photon (...) absorptiometry every other year in 108 women, all of whom were followed from the time of menopause for a mean period of 15 years. Postmenopausal serum estradiol levels and fractures of the distal radius were noted. RESULTS: The mean (+/-SD) annual decrease in bone mineral density was 1.9+/-0.7 percent. The medullary bone diameter increased annually by 1.1+/-0.9 percent, and the periosteal diameter by 0.7+/-0.3 percent; the strength index decreased by 0.7+/-0.7 percent. The expansion of the medullary diameter

NEJM2003

193. Effects of specific post-menopausal hormone therapies on bone mineral density in post-menopausal women: a meta-analysis

Effects of specific post-menopausal hormone therapies on bone mineral density in post-menopausal women: a meta-analysis Effects of specific post-menopausal hormone therapies on bone mineral density in post-menopausal women: a meta-analysis Effects of specific post-menopausal hormone therapies on bone mineral density in post-menopausal women: a meta-analysis Doren M, Nilsson J A, Johnell O CRD summary This review assessed the effects of hormone therapy on bone mineral density in postmenopausal (...) acetate, levonorgestrel, cyproterone acetate, norethisterone (norethindrone) acetate, desogestrel and norgestrel. Participants included in the review Studies in postmenopausal and/or ovariectomised women were eligible for inclusion, regardless of prior fracture history. The classification of women as postmenopausal in the primary studies was accepted. Most of the women in the included studies were aged 50 to 60 years (range: 40 to 76). Most studies were conducted in early-menopausal women with both

DARE.2003

194. Critical evaluation of the safety of Cimicifuga racemosa in menopause symptom relief

Critical evaluation of the safety of Cimicifuga racemosa in menopause symptom relief Critical evaluation of the safety of Cimicifuga racemosa in menopause symptom relief Critical evaluation of the safety of Cimicifuga racemosa in menopause symptom relief Dog T L, Powell K L, Weisman S M CRD summary This review concluded that extracts of Cimifuga are safe to use in women with menopausal symptoms. The conclusion was generally in line with the evidence presented. The review had methodological (...) and reporting weaknesses that make it difficult to be certain of the reliability of the conclusions. Authors' objectives To assess the safety of Cimicifuga racemosa in women with menopausal symptoms. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS Previews and SciSearch were searched. Searches were also conducted of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and World Health Organization (WHO) adverse event reporting systems, monographs, compendia, and unpublished data from Schnaper and Brummer. The search terms for the FDA

DARE.2003

195. A systematic review of herbal medicinal products for the treatment of menopausal symptoms

A systematic review of herbal medicinal products for the treatment of menopausal symptoms A systematic review of herbal medicinal products for the treatment of menopausal symptoms A systematic review of herbal medicinal products for the treatment of menopausal symptoms Huntley A L, Ernst E CRD summary This review assessed whether herbal medicinal products improved symptoms of the menopause. The authors concluded that there is no convincing evidence that any product is effective, although black (...) cohosh may be of use and red clover may help severe symptoms. The review was generally well conducted, although the reporting was variable, and the conclusions are likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives To evaluate the benefit of herbal medicinal products for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, Phytodok and the Cochrane Library were searched from inception to December 2002; the search terms were given. No language restrictions were applied. In addition, the reference

DARE.2003

196. Economic evaluation of norethisterone acetate/ethinylestradiol (FemHRT) for women with menopausal symptoms

Economic evaluation of norethisterone acetate/ethinylestradiol (FemHRT) for women with menopausal symptoms Economic evaluation of norethisterone acetate/ethinylestradiol (FemHRT) for women with menopausal symptoms Economic evaluation of norethisterone acetate/ethinylestradiol (FemHRT) for women with menopausal symptoms Coyle D, Cranney A, Tugwell P Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief (...) ) (CEE-MPA) and with no therapy. As a second-line therapy, NA-EE was assumed to be used after a woman was no longer compliant after 6 months of a first-line therapy. NA-EE was compared with no second-line therapy and with CEE-MPA as second-line therapy. Type of intervention Treatment. Economic study type Cost-utility analysis. Study population The study population comprised a hypothetical cohort of 50-year-old menopausal women. Setting The study setting was primary care. The economic study

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2003

199. Paroxetine controlled release in the treatment of menopausal hot flashes: a randomized controlled trial.

Paroxetine controlled release in the treatment of menopausal hot flashes: a randomized controlled trial. 12783913 2003 06 04 2003 06 12 2016 10 17 0098-7484 289 21 2003 Jun 04 JAMA JAMA Paroxetine controlled release in the treatment of menopausal hot flashes: a randomized controlled trial. 2827-34 Standard therapy for hot flashes has been hormone replacement with estradiol or progestational agents, but recent data suggest that antidepressants inhibiting serotonin reuptake may also be effective (...) . To evaluate a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (paroxetine controlled release [CR]) in treating the vasomotor symptoms displayed by a general cross-section of menopausal women. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study conducted across 17 US sites, including urban, suburban, and rural clinics. A total of 165 menopausal women aged 18 years or older experiencing at least 2 to 3 daily hot flashes and must have discontinued any hormone replacement therapy for at least 6 weeks

JAMA2003

200. Menopausal hormone replacement therapy and risk of ovarian cancer.

Menopausal hormone replacement therapy and risk of ovarian cancer. CONTEXT: The association between menopausal hormone replacement therapy and ovarian cancer is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether hormone replacement therapy using estrogen only, estrogen-progestin only, or both estrogen only and estrogen-progestin increases ovarian cancer risk. DESIGN: A 1979-1998 cohort study of former participants in the Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project, a nationwide breast cancer screening (...) program. SETTING: Twenty-nine US clinical centers. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 44 241 postmenopausal women (mean age at start of follow-up, 56.6 years). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Incident ovarian cancer. RESULTS: We identified 329 women who developed ovarian cancer during follow-up. In time-dependent analyses adjusted for age, menopause type, and oral contraceptive use, ever use of estrogen only was significantly associated with ovarian cancer (rate ratio [RR], 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-2.0

JAMA2002