Latest & greatest articles for measles

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on measles or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on measles and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Top results for measles

1. Measles, Mumps, Rubella Vaccination and Autism: A Nationwide Cohort Study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Measles, Mumps, Rubella Vaccination and Autism: A Nationwide Cohort Study. The hypothesized link between the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine and autism continues to cause concern and challenge vaccine uptake.To evaluate whether the MMR vaccine increases the risk for autism in children, subgroups of children, or time periods after vaccination.Nationwide cohort study.Denmark.657 461 children born in Denmark from 1999 through 31 December 2010, with follow-up from 1 year of age and through 31

2019 Annals of Internal Medicine

2. Measles infection

Measles infection Measles infection - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Measles infection Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2019 Summary Preventable by immunisation but high levels of coverage are required to prevent outbreaks of disease from occurring. No specific treatment for measles is available except for supportive care. Complications of measles are more common in immunocompromised (...) and poorly nourished individuals and include pneumonia, laryngotracheitis, otitis media, and encephalitis. Definition Measles is a highly infectious disease caused by measles virus, characterised by a maculopapular rash, cough, coryza, conjunctivitis, and a pathognomonic enanthem (Koplik's spots) with an incubation period of about 10 days. History and exam potential exposure to measles unimmunised or vaccine failure fever cough coryza conjunctivitis Koplik's spots maculopapular rash exposure to measles

2019 BMJ Best Practice

3. Measles

Measles Top results for measles - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Find evidence fast ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4) Loading (...) history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for measles The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

4. The Challenge of Measles Control

in the United States. Dev Biol Stand 65: 13-21. [57] Parker, A. A., W. Staggs, G. H. Dayan, I. R. Ortega-Sanchez, P. A. Rota, L. Lowe, P. Boardman, R. Teclaw, C. Graves, and C. W. LeBaron. 2006. Implications of a 2005 Measles Outbreak in Indiana for Sustained Elimination of Measles in the United States. N Engl J Med 355: 447-455. [58] Parker, A. A., and A. Uzicanin. 2009. The Pre-Travel Consultation: Measles (Rubeola). In G. W. Brunette, P. E. Kozarsky, A. J. Magill, and D. R. Shlim (ed.), CDC Health (...) The Challenge of Measles Control The Challenge of Measles Control – Clinical Correlations Search The Challenge of Measles Control September 15, 2010 13 min read By Taher Modarressi Faculty Peer Reviewed Measles remains one of the leading causes of preventable child mortality worldwide, despite the development of an effective vaccine in the 1960s. Even as late as the early 1990s, measles continued to infect tens of millions of people and claimed over a million lives each year (51]. Although

2010 Clinical Correlations

5. Measles infection

Measles infection Measles infection - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Measles infection Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2019 Summary Preventable by immunisation but high levels of coverage are required to prevent outbreaks of disease from occurring. No specific treatment for measles is available except for supportive care. Complications of measles are more common in immunocompromised (...) and poorly nourished individuals and include pneumonia, laryngotracheitis, otitis media, and encephalitis. Definition Measles is a highly infectious disease caused by measles virus, characterised by a maculopapular rash, cough, coryza, conjunctivitis, and a pathognomonic enanthem (Koplik's spots) with an incubation period of about 10 days. History and exam potential exposure to measles unimmunised or vaccine failure fever cough coryza conjunctivitis Koplik's spots maculopapular rash exposure to measles

2018 BMJ Best Practice

6. Public Health Interventions to Reduce the Secondary Spread of Measles

Public Health Interventions to Reduce the Secondary Spread of Measles Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health Agence canadienne des médicaments et des technologies de la santé Supporting Informed Decisions Rapid Response Report: Systematic Review Public Health Interventions to Reduce the Secondary Spread of Measles CADTH May 2015Cite as: Foerster V, Perras C, Spry C, Weeks L. Public health interventions to reduce the secondary spread of measles [Internet]. Ottawa: CADTH; 2015 May (...) . (CADTH rapid response report: systematic review). [cited YYYY-MM-DD]. Available from: https://www.cadth.ca/public-health-interventions-reduce-secondary- spread-measles Disclaimer: This report is a review of existing public literature, studies, materials, and other information and documentation (collectively the “source documentation”) that are available to CADTH. The accuracy of the contents of the source documentation on which this report is based is not warranted, assured, or represented in any way

2015 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

8. The measles-mumps-rubella vaccine (MMR) and autism

The measles-mumps-rubella vaccine (MMR) and autism The measles-mumps-rubella vaccine (MMR) and autism The measles-mumps-rubella vaccine (MMR) and autism Higgins S Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Higgins S. The measles-mumps-rubella vaccine (MMR) and autism. Clayton, Victoria: Centre for Clinical Effectiveness (CCE) 2003: 14 Authors' objectives (...) This aim of this critical appraisal was to assess whether the combined measles-mumps-rubella vaccine (MMR) given according to the Department of Health's immunisation schedule increase the child's risk of developing autism. Project page URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Autistic Disorder; Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine /adverse effects Language Published English Country of organisation Australia Address for correspondence Monash Institute of Health Services Research, Block E

2003 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

9. Measles: post-exposure prophylaxis

Measles: post-exposure prophylaxis Measles: post-exposure prophylaxis - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. Accept cookies You’ve accepted all cookies. You can at any time. Hide Search Research and analysis Measles: post-exposure prophylaxis Guidelines on the use of post-exposure prophylaxis for measles in high-risk groups. Published 1 May 2009 Last updated 4 July 2019 — From: Documents Ref: PHE publications gateway number: GW-492 If you use assistive technology (...) (such as a screen reader) and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email . Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use. Details This guidance summarises the evidence for the effectiveness of post-exposure prophylaxis ( 4 July 2019 Revised guidance. 17 June 2019 Updated guidelines on post-exposure prophylaxis for measles. 11 August 2017 Revised post-exposure prophylaxis guidance: details of changes on page 4. 1 May 2009 First

2019 Public Health England

10. Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine was not associated with autism in children Full Text available with Trip Pro

Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine was not associated with autism in children Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine was not associated with autism in children | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts (...) Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine was not associated with autism in children Article Text Causation Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine was not associated with autism in children Free Stephanie Wright , CFNP, CPNP, PhD Statistics from

2004 Evidence-Based Nursing

11. Zinc supplementation for the treatment of measles in children. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Zinc supplementation for the treatment of measles in children. Measles is an important cause of childhood morbidity and mortality globally, despite increasing vaccine coverage. Zinc plays a significant role in the maintenance of normal immunological functions, therefore supplements given to zinc-deficient children will increase the availability of zinc and could reduce measles-related morbidity and mortality. This is an update of a review first published in 2015.To assess the effects of zinc (...) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We included only one study, and did not conduct meta-analysis.We did not identify any new studies for inclusion in this update. One RCT met our inclusion criteria. The study was conducted in India and included 85 children diagnosed with measles and pneumonia. The trial showed no significant difference in mortality between children with measles and pneumonia who received zinc supplements and those who received placebo (RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.01 to 8.14

2017 Cochrane

12. Effectiveness of measles vaccination and vitamin A treatment

Effectiveness of measles vaccination and vitamin A treatment Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2010 DARE.

13. The Somali measles outbreak in Minnesota: Thanks again, Andy (and American antivaxers), for the measles

The Somali measles outbreak in Minnesota: Thanks again, Andy (and American antivaxers), for the measles The Somali measles outbreak in Minnesota: Thanks again, Andy (and American antivaxers), for the measles | ScienceBlogs Advertisment Search Search Toggle navigation Main navigation The Somali measles outbreak in Minnesota: Thanks again, Andy (and American antivaxers), for the measles By on May 12, 2017. Normally, I like to mix up my topics, but it's been one of those weeks where basically (...) a measles outbreak in 2011 and are . It's all thanks to American antivaxers who targeted this population when there was a cluster of autism cases among them in 2008 and were "inspired" by (not to mention aided and abetted by) the most infamous antivaccine quack of all, Andrew Wakefield. These antivaxers are , even in the midst of this latest measles outbreak, which, the last time I checked, , many hospitalized. There is a telling and educational article by Julia Belluz published by Vox.com, in which

2017 Respectful Insolence

14. Measles outbreaks and the debate over how far we should go requiring vaccination

Measles outbreaks and the debate over how far we should go requiring vaccination Measles outbreaks and the debate over how far we should go requiring vaccination | ScienceBlogs Advertisment Search Search Toggle navigation Main navigation Measles outbreaks and the debate over how far we should go requiring vaccination By on October 5, 2016. Whenever we discuss vaccines and vaccine hesitancy, thanks to Andrew Wakefield the one vaccine that almost always comes up is the MMR, which is the combined (...) measles-mumps-rubella vaccine. In 1998, Wakefield published a case series of cherry-picked patients in which he strongly inferred that the MMR vaccine was associated with autism and “autistic enterocolitis.” Of course, even the way Wakefield spun it, this wasn’t enough evidence to link the MMR vaccine to autism, which is no doubt why Wakefield never explicitly said that it did in the paper describing his case series. My guess has always been that the peer reviewers wouldn’t let him. However, outside

2016 Respectful Insolence

15. Lack of Association Between Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccination and Autism in Children: A Case-Control Study. (Abstract)

Lack of Association Between Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccination and Autism in Children: A Case-Control Study. The first objective of the study was to determine whether there is a relationship between the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination and autism in children. The second objective was to examine whether the risk of autism differs between use of MMR and the single measles vaccine.Case-control study.The 96 cases with childhood or atypical autism, aged 2 to 15, were included into the study (...) were adjusted to mother's age, medication during pregnancy, gestation time, perinatal injury and Apgar score.For children vaccinated before diagnosis, autism risk was lower in children vaccinated with MMR than in the nonvaccinated (OR: 0.17, 95% CI: 0.06-0.52) as well as to vaccinated with single measles vaccine (OR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.22-0.91). The risk for vaccinated versus nonvaccinated (independent of vaccine type) was 0.28 (95% CI: 0.10-0.76). The risk connected with being vaccinated before onset

2009 Pediatric Infectious Dsease Journal

16. Measles, Rubeola (Diagnosis)

Measles, Rubeola (Diagnosis) Measles: Practice Essentials, Background, Pathophysiology Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvOTY2MjIwLW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing > Measles Updated: Feb 22, 2018 Author: Selina (...) SP Chen, MD, MPH; Chief Editor: Russell W Steele, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Measles Overview Practice Essentials Measles, also known as rubeola, is one of the most contagious infectious diseases, with at least a 90% secondary infection rate in susceptible domestic contacts. Despite being considered primarily a childhood illness, measles can affect people of all ages. See the image below. Face of boy with measles. See , a Critical Images slideshow, to help stay current

2014 eMedicine.com

17. Association of autistic spectrum disorder and the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine: a systematic review of current epidemiological evidence

Association of autistic spectrum disorder and the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine: a systematic review of current epidemiological evidence Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2003 DARE.

18. Measles, Rubeola (Treatment)

Measles, Rubeola (Treatment) Measles Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Supportive Care, Antiviral Therapy Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvOTY2MjIwLXRyZWF0bWVudA== processing > Measles (...) Treatment & Management Updated: Feb 22, 2018 Author: Selina SP Chen, MD, MPH; Chief Editor: Russell W Steele, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Measles Treatment Approach Considerations Treatment of measles is essentially supportive care with maintenance of good hydration and replacement of fluids lost through diarrhea or emesis. Intravenous (IV) rehydration may be necessary if dehydration is severe. Vitamin A supplementation, especially in children and patients with clinical signs

2014 eMedicine.com

19. Immunogenicity, safety, and tolerability of the measles-vectored chikungunya virus vaccine MV-CHIK: a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled and active-controlled phase 2 trial. (Abstract)

Immunogenicity, safety, and tolerability of the measles-vectored chikungunya virus vaccine MV-CHIK: a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled and active-controlled phase 2 trial. Chikungunya fever is an emerging viral disease and substantial threat to public health. We aimed to assess the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of a live-attenuated, measles-vectored chikungunya vaccine (MV-CHIK).In this double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled and active-controlled phase 2 trial, we (...) enrolled healthy volunteers aged 18-55 years at four study sites in Austria and Germany. Participants were randomly assigned to receive intramuscular injections with MV-CHIK (5 × 104 or 5 × 105 50% tissue culture infectious dose), control vaccine, or measles prime and MV-CHIK, in two different administration regimens. Randomisation was done by use of three-digit randomisation codes in envelopes provided by a data management service. The participants and investigators were masked to treatment assignment

2018 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high

20. Towards a further understanding of measles vaccine hesitancy in Khartoum state, Sudan: A qualitative study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Towards a further understanding of measles vaccine hesitancy in Khartoum state, Sudan: A qualitative study. Vaccine hesitancy is one of the contributors to low vaccination coverage in both developed and developing countries. Sudan is one of the countries that suffers from low measles vaccine coverage and from measles outbreaks. In order to facilitate the future development of interventions, this study aimed at exploring the opinions of Expanded Program on Immunization officers at ministries (...) of health, WHO, UNICEF and vaccine care providers at Khartoum-based primary healthcare centers.Qualitative data were collected using semi-structured interviews during the period January-March 2018. Data (i.e. quotes) were matched to the categories and the sub-categories of a framework that was developed by the WHO-SAGE Working Group called ''Determinants of Vaccine Hesitancy Matrix''.The interviews were conducted with 14 participants. The majority of participants confirmed the existence of measles

2019 PLoS ONE