Latest & greatest articles for measles

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Top results for measles

61. Antibiotics for preventing complications in children with measles. (Full text)

Antibiotics for preventing complications in children with measles. Measles is the leading killer among vaccine-preventable diseases; it is responsible for an estimated 44% of the 1.7 million vaccine-preventable deaths among children annually.To assess the effects of antibiotics given to children with measles to prevent complications and reduce pneumonia, other morbidities and mortality.We searched CENTRAL 2013, Issue 4, MEDLINE (1966 to May week 4, 2013) and EMBASE (1980 to May 2013).Randomised (...) ), diarrhea (OR 0.53; 95% CI 0.23 to 1.22) or croup (OR 0.16; 95% CI 0.01 to 4.06). No major adverse effects attributable to antibiotics were reported.The studies reviewed were of poor quality and used older antibiotics. This review suggests a beneficial effect of antibiotics in preventing complications such as pneumonia, purulent otitis media and tonsillitis in children with measles. On the basis of this review, it is not possible to recommend definitive guidelines on the type of antibiotic, duration

2013 Cochrane PubMed abstract

62. Effects of the live attenuated measles-mumps-rubella booster vaccination on disease activity in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a randomized trial. (Full text)

Effects of the live attenuated measles-mumps-rubella booster vaccination on disease activity in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a randomized trial. The immunogenicity and the effects of live attenuated measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination on disease activity in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are matters of concern, especially in patients treated with immunocompromising therapies.To assess whether MMR booster vaccination affects disease activity and to describe (...) in the modified intention-to-treat analysis, including 60 using methotrexate and 15 using biologics. Disease activity during complete follow-up did not differ between 63 revaccinated patients (JADAS-27, 2.8; 95% CI, 2.1-3.5) and 68 controls (JADAS-27, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.7-3.1), with a difference of 0.4 (95% CI, -0.5 to 1.2), within the equivalence margin of 2.0. At 12 months, seroprotection rates were higher in revaccinated patients vs controls (measles, 100% vs 92% [95% CI, 84%-99%]; mumps, 97% [95% CI, 95%-100

2013 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high PubMed abstract

63. Assessment of the 2010 global measles mortality reduction goal: results from a model of surveillance data. (Abstract)

Assessment of the 2010 global measles mortality reduction goal: results from a model of surveillance data. In 2008 all WHO member states endorsed a target of 90% reduction in measles mortality by 2010 over 2000 levels. We developed a model to estimate progress made towards this goal.We constructed a state-space model with population and immunisation coverage estimates and reported surveillance data to estimate annual national measles cases, distributed across age classes. We estimated deaths (...) by applying age-specific and country-specific case-fatality ratios to estimated cases in each age-country class.Estimated global measles mortality decreased 74% from 535,300 deaths (95% CI 347,200-976,400) in 2000 to 139,300 (71,200-447,800) in 2010. Measles mortality was reduced by more than three-quarters in all WHO regions except the WHO southeast Asia region. India accounted for 47% of estimated measles mortality in 2010, and the WHO African region accounted for 36%.Despite rapid progress in measles

2012 Lancet

64. Surveillance Guidelines for Measles, Rubella and Congenital Rubella Syndrome in the WHO European Region

Surveillance Guidelines for Measles, Rubella and Congenital Rubella Syndrome in the WHO European Region Surveillance Guidelines for Measles, Rubella and Congenital Rubella Syndrome in the WHO European Region JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Toggle navigation Toggle navigation Search Browse Statistics Related Links Surveillance Guidelines for Measles, Rubella and Congenital Rubella Syndrome in the WHO European Region, Updated December (...) 2012 View/ Open View Statistics Altmetrics Share Abstract The WHO Regional Committee for Europe adopted the goal of eliminating indigenous measles transmission in 1998. In 2005, the Regional Committee expanded this commitment to include rubella and set a date for the elimination of both diseases by 2010. Although Member States did make progress, through the implementation of a strategic plan, the goal was not achieved. The WHO Regional Committee for Europe acknowledged at its sixtieth session

2012 WHO

65. Effect of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria during infancy on serological responses to measles and other vaccines used in the Expanded Programme on Immunization: results from five randomised controlled trials. (Abstract)

Effect of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria during infancy on serological responses to measles and other vaccines used in the Expanded Programme on Immunization: results from five randomised controlled trials. Intermittent preventive treatment for malaria during infancy (IPTi) is the administration of a full therapeutic course of antimalarial drugs to infants living in settings where malaria is endemic, at the time of routine vaccination in the first year of life. We investigated (...) eligible, and analyses included all children who had received measles vaccination (at 9 months of age) and at least one dose of IPTi or placebo. Blood samples were collected before and after vaccination, and antibody titres were measured by plaque reduction neutralisation (measles, yellow fever), microneutralisation (polio serotypes 1 and 3), and ELISA (all other EPI antigens). Laboratory personnel were unaware of the randomisation groups. We compared the proportion of infants in the IPTi and placebo

2012 Lancet

66. Chinese medicinal herbs for measles. (Abstract)

Chinese medicinal herbs for measles. Measles is an infectious disease caused by the Morbillivirus. Chinese physicians believe that medicinal herbs are effective in alleviating symptoms and preventing complications. Chinese herbal medicines are dispensed according to the particular symptoms. This is the second update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2006.To assess the effectiveness and possible adverse effects of Chinese medicinal herbs for measles.We searched the Cochrane Central (...) 2011) and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials for ongoing trials.Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of Chinese medicinal herbs in patients with measles (without complications).Two review authors (SC, TW) independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We telephone interviewed the trial authors for missing information regarding participant allocation. Some trials allocated participants according to the sequence they were admitted to the trials, that is to say, by using a pseudo-random

2011 Cochrane

67. Measles. (Abstract)

Measles. Measles is a highly contagious disease caused by measles virus and is one of the most devastating infectious diseases of man--measles was responsible for millions of deaths annually worldwide before the introduction of the measles vaccines. Remarkable progress in reducing the number of people dying from measles has been made through measles vaccination, with an estimated 164,000 deaths attributed to measles in 2008. This achievement attests to the enormous importance of measles (...) vaccination to public health. However, this progress is threatened by failure to maintain high levels of measles vaccine coverage. Recent measles outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and the USA show the ease with which measles virus can re-enter communities if high levels of population immunity are not sustained. The major challenges for continued measles control and eventual eradication will be logistical, financial, and the garnering of sufficient political will. These challenges need to be met

2011 Lancet

68. The Challenge of Measles Control

The Challenge of Measles Control The Challenge of Measles Control – Clinical Correlations Search The Challenge of Measles Control September 15, 2010 13 min read By Taher Modarressi Faculty Peer Reviewed Measles remains one of the leading causes of preventable child mortality worldwide, despite the development of an effective vaccine in the 1960s. Even as late as the early 1990s, measles continued to infect tens of millions of people and claimed over a million lives each year (51]. Although (...) mortality dropped by 78% from 2000 to 2008 due to aggressive control initiatives, the disease is still responsible for 164,000 deaths annually [12, 72]. Morbidity and mortality is mostly due to measles-associated pneumonia [13, 59], middle-ear infection [13, 30, 59], corneal inflammation and ulceration (27, 28, 46, 64), diarrhea [19, 35, 61, 70] and, rarely, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis [36, 37, 77]. Currently, the disease accounts for 3-4% of all deaths worldwide in children under the age

2010 Clinical Correlations

69. Thrombocytopenic purpura after measles-mumps-rubella vaccination: a systematic review of the literature and guidance for management (Abstract)

Thrombocytopenic purpura after measles-mumps-rubella vaccination: a systematic review of the literature and guidance for management To determine the incidence of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) after measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) immunization compared with natural measles and rubella, its clinical course and outcome, and the risk of recurrence after repeat MMR vaccination.We performed a systematic review of the Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to present) bibliographic database. We selected studies

2010 EvidenceUpdates

70. Early waning of maternal measles antibodies in era of measles elimination: longitudinal study. (Full text)

Early waning of maternal measles antibodies in era of measles elimination: longitudinal study. To investigate the duration of the presence of maternal antibodies to measles in infants.Prospective study (May 2006 to November 2008).Five hospitals in the Province of Antwerp, Belgium.Of 221 pregnant women recruited, 207 healthy woman-infant pairs were included-divided into a vaccinated group (n=87) and naturally immune group (n=120), according to vaccination documents and history.Measles IgG (...) study describes a very early susceptibility to measles in infants of both vaccinated women and women with naturally acquired immunity. This finding is important in view of recent outbreaks and is an argument for timeliness of the first dose of a measles vaccine and vaccination of travelling or migrating children under the age of 1 year.

2010 BMJ PubMed abstract

71. Effectiveness of measles vaccination and vitamin A treatment

Effectiveness of measles vaccination and vitamin A treatment Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2010 DARE.

72. Non-specific effects of standard measles vaccine at 4.5 and 9 months of age on childhood mortality: randomised controlled trial. (Full text)

Non-specific effects of standard measles vaccine at 4.5 and 9 months of age on childhood mortality: randomised controlled trial. To examine in a randomised trial whether a 25% difference in mortality exists between 4.5 months and 3 years of age for children given two standard doses of Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccines at 4.5 and 9 months of age compared with those given one dose of measles vaccine at 9 months of age (current policy).Randomised controlled trial.The Bandim Health Project, Guinea (...) -Bissau, which maintains a health and demographic surveillance system in an urban area.6648 children aged 4.5 months of age who had received three doses of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine at least four weeks before enrolment. A large proportion of the children (80%) had previously taken part in randomised trials of neonatal vitamin A supplementation.Children were randomised to receive Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccine at 4.5 and 9 months of age (group A), no vaccine at 4.5 months and Edmonston

2010 BMJ Controlled trial quality: predicted high PubMed abstract

73. Chinese medicinal herbs for measles. (Abstract)

Chinese medicinal herbs for measles. Measles is an infectious disease caused by the Morbilli virus. Chinese physicians believe that medicinal herbs are effective in alleviating symptoms and preventing complications. Chinese herbal medicines are dispensed according to the particular symptoms. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2006.To assess the effectiveness and possible adverse effects of Chinese medicinal herbs in treating measles.We searched the Cochrane Central (...) ) in which patients with measles without complications were treated with Chinese medicinal herbs.Three review authors (YZ, RG, TW) independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We telephone interviewed the study authors for missing information regarding participant allocation. Some trials allocated participants according to the sequence they were admitted to the trials, that is to say, by using a pseudo-random allocation method; none of the trials concealed the allocation or blinding method.We

2009 Cochrane

74. Measles in Europe: an epidemiological assessment. (Abstract)

Measles in Europe: an epidemiological assessment. Measles persists in Europe despite the incorporation of the measles vaccine into routine childhood vaccination programmes more than 20 years ago. Our aim was therefore to review the epidemiology of measles in relation to the goal of elimination by 2010.National surveillance institutions from 32 European countries submitted data for 2006-07. Data for age-group, diagnosis confirmation, vaccination, hospital treatment, the presence of acute (...) encephalitis as a complication of disease, and death were obtained. 30 countries also supplied data about importation of disease. Clinical, laboratory-confirmed, and epidemiologically linked cases that met the requirements for national surveillance were analysed. Cases were separated by age: younger than 1 year, 1-4 years, 5-9 years, 10-14 years, 15-19 years, and older than 20 years. Countries with indigenous measles incidence per 100 000 inhabitants per year of 0, less than 0.1, 0.1-1, and more than 1

2009 Lancet

75. Cost-effectiveness of supplementary immunization for measles in India

Cost-effectiveness of supplementary immunization for measles in India Cost-effectiveness of supplementary immunization for measles in India Cost-effectiveness of supplementary immunization for measles in India Dabral M Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study (...) and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of a supplementary immunisation activity for measles compared with a standard single-dose vaccine programme for children in districts of India with low vaccination coverage. The author concluded that the supplementary immunisation activity was cost-effective in reducing mortality and morbidity from measles. The methods and reporting were mostly satisfactory, but the selection and details of the clinical and economic data sources

2009 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

76. Safety and immunogenicity of concurrent administration of live attenuated influenza vaccine with measles-mumps-rubella and varicella vaccines to infants 12 to 15 months of age (Abstract)

Safety and immunogenicity of concurrent administration of live attenuated influenza vaccine with measles-mumps-rubella and varicella vaccines to infants 12 to 15 months of age This study evaluated the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of live attenuated influenza vaccine administered concurrently with measles-mumps-rubella vaccine and varicella vaccine to healthy children 12 to 15 months of age.Children were assigned randomly to receive (1) measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, varicella (...) vaccine, and intranasal placebo on day 0, followed by 1 dose of live attenuated influenza vaccine on days 42 and 72; (2) measles-mumps-rubella, varicella, and live attenuated influenza vaccines on day 0, followed by a second dose of live attenuated influenza vaccine on day 42 and intranasally administered placebo on day 72; or (3) 1 dose of live attenuated influenza vaccine on days 0 and 42, followed by measles-mumps-rubella and varicella vaccines on day 72. Serum samples were collected before

2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

77. Risk of immune thrombocytopenic purpura after measles-mumps-rubella immunization in children (Abstract)

Risk of immune thrombocytopenic purpura after measles-mumps-rubella immunization in children The measles-mumps-rubella vaccine has been associated with immune thrombocytopenia purpura in 2 small studies.By using the Vaccine Safety Datalink, we identified measles-mumps-rubella-vaccinated children aged 1 to 18. A case of immune thrombocytopenia purpura was defined as a patient with a platelet count of < or = 50,000/microL with clinical bleeding and normal red and white blood cell indices (...) . The immune thrombocytopenia purpura incidence rates during exposed (42 days after vaccination) and unexposed time periods were determined. A retrospective cohort of vaccinated children was used to determine incident rate ratios for children aged 1 to 18 years, 12 to 23 months, and 12 to 15 months.A total of 1,036,689 children received 1,107,814 measles-mumps-rubella vaccinations; there were 259 confirmed patients with immune thrombocytopenia purpura. Because only 5 exposed cases occurred after age 2

2008 EvidenceUpdates

78. Factors associated with uptake of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR) and use of single antigen vaccines in a contemporary UK cohort: prospective cohort study. (Full text)

Factors associated with uptake of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR) and use of single antigen vaccines in a contemporary UK cohort: prospective cohort study. To estimate uptake of the combined measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR) and single antigen vaccines and explore factors associated with uptake and reasons for not using MMR.Nationally representative cohort study.Children born in the UK, 2000-2.14,578 children for whom data on immunisation were available.Immunisation status

2008 BMJ PubMed abstract

79. Efficacy and safety of measles, mumps, rubella and varicella live viral vaccines in transplant recipients receiving immunosuppressive drugs

Efficacy and safety of measles, mumps, rubella and varicella live viral vaccines in transplant recipients receiving immunosuppressive drugs Efficacy and safety of measles, mumps, rubella and varicella live viral vaccines in transplant recipients receiving immunosuppressive drugs Efficacy and safety of measles, mumps, rubella and varicella live viral vaccines in transplant recipients receiving immunosuppressive drugs Danerseau AM, Robinson JL CRD summary The authors concluded that available (...) published data on the efficacy and safety of live viral vaccines was insufficient to derive evidence-based guidelines for use of such vaccines in transplant recipients on immunosuppression. The reliability of the authors’ conclusion is unclear given multiple flaws in the review methods and small number of low quality studies reviewed. Authors' objectives To assess the efficacy and safety of live viral vaccines for measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (chicken pox) in post-transplant patients receiving

2008 DARE.

80. Protective efficacy of standard Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccination in infants aged 4.5 months: interim analysis of a randomised clinical trial. (Full text)

Protective efficacy of standard Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccination in infants aged 4.5 months: interim analysis of a randomised clinical trial. To examine the protective efficacy of measles vaccination in infants in a low income country before 9 months of age.Randomised clinical trial.1333 infants aged 4.5 months: 441 in treatment group and 892 in control group.Urban area in Guinea-Bissau.Measles vaccination using standard titre Edmonston-Zagreb vaccine at 4.5 months of age.Vaccine efficacy (...) against measles infection, admission to hospital for measles, and measles mortality before standard vaccination at 9 months of age.28% of the children tested at 4.5 months of age had protective levels of maternal antibodies against measles at enrolment. After early vaccination against measles 92% had measles antibodies at 9 months of age. A measles outbreak offered a unique situation for testing the efficacy of early measles vaccination. During the outbreak, 96 children developed measles; 19

2008 BMJ Controlled trial quality: uncertain PubMed abstract