Latest & greatest articles for low back pain

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Top results for low back pain

81. Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Back Pain

Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Back Pain Low Back Pain -- Clinical Recommendation Welcome Search Search Specify your search AAFP.org Patient Care Clinical Practice Guideline Low Back Pain Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Back Pain (Endorsed, April 2017) The guideline, Noninvasive Treatments for Acute, Subacute, and Chronic Low Back Pain , was developed by the American College of Physicians and was endorsed by the American Academy of Family Physicians. Key Recommendations Nonpharmacologic (...) treatment, including superficial heat, massage, acupuncture, or spinal manipulation, should be used initially for most patients with acute or subacute low back pain, as they will improve over time regardless of treatment. When pharmacologic treatment is desired, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or skeletal muscle relaxants should be used. Nonpharmacologic treatment, including exercise, multidisciplinary rehabilitation, acupuncture, mindfulness-based stress reduction, tai chi, yoga, motor

American Academy of Family Physicians2017

90. Manipulating Research for Spinal Manipulative Therapy for Low Back Pain

Manipulating Research for Spinal Manipulative Therapy for Low Back Pain Tools for Practice is proudly sponsored by the Alberta College of Family Physicians (ACFP). ACFP is a provincial, professional voluntary organization, representing more than 4,500 family physicians, family medicine residents and medical students in Alberta. Established over sixty years ago, the ACFP strives for excellence in family practice through advocacy, continuing medical education, and primary care research (...) . www.acfp.ca February 21, 2017 Manipulating Research for Spinal Manipulative Therapy for Low Back Pain Clinical Question: Is spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) effective for low back pain (LBP)? Bottom Line: Research around SMT is poor, consistently inconsistent, and almost impossible to interpret. Likely no reliable effects in acute LBP, but possible small effects in chronic LBP, at best improved pain ( =0.9 points out of 10) and recovery (for one in ~11 patients at one month) but two thirds of comparisons

Tools for Practice2017

91. Ibuprofen plus paracetamol versus ibuprofen in acute low back pain: a randomized open label multicenter clinical study.

Ibuprofen plus paracetamol versus ibuprofen in acute low back pain: a randomized open label multicenter clinical study. 27978532 2016 12 15 2017 04 03 0303-464X 42 1 2017 Jan-Mar Acta reumatologica portuguesa Acta Reumatol Port Ibuprofen plus paracetamol versus ibuprofen in acute low back pain: a randomized open label multicenter clinical study. 18-25 to estimate whether combination of ibuprofen and paracetamol is more effective than ibuprofen in monotherapy, in the treatment of acute low back pain (...) . 80 adult patients with acute low back pain were randomized into two subgroups. In the first subgroup, 40 patients were treated with ibuprofen 400mg three times a day (TID), whilst patients in the second subgroup (n=40) were treated with a fixed-dose combination tablet of ibuprofen 200mg plus paracetamol 325mg TID, for three consecutive days. Patients were followed for another 7 days. Efficacy and tolerability of both treatment options was assessed. A statistically significant decrease in pain

Acta reumatologica portuguesa2016

92. More isn’t better with acute low back pain treatment

More isn’t better with acute low back pain treatment More isn't better with acute low back pain treatment Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics More isn't better with acute low back pain treatment View/ Open Date 2016-06 Format Metadata Abstract More isn't better with acute low back pain treatment Adding (...) cyclobenzaprine or oxycodone/acetaminophen to naproxen for the treatment of acute low back pain does nothing more than increase adverse effects. Practice changer: Consider treating patients with acute low back pain with naproxen only, as adding cyclobenzaprine or oxycodone/acetaminophen to scheduled naproxen does not improve functional assessment at 7 days or 3 months and increases adverse effects. URI Part of Citation Journal of Family Practice, 65(6) 2016: 404-406. Collections hosted by hosted by

PURLS2016

94. Neuromuscular exercise and back counselling for female nursing personnel with recurrent non-specific low back pain: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial (NURSE-RCT).

Neuromuscular exercise and back counselling for female nursing personnel with recurrent non-specific low back pain: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial (NURSE-RCT). 27900169 2016 11 30 2017 02 20 2 1 2016 BMJ open sport & exercise medicine BMJ Open Sport Exerc Med Neuromuscular exercise and back counselling for female nursing personnel with recurrent non-specific low back pain: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial (NURSE-RCT). e000098 Nursing personnel have high risk (...) for incidence of low back pain (LBP) followed by development of chronic pain and disability. Multiple risk factors such as patient handling, night shift work and lack of supporting work culture have been identified. In subacute LBP, high-fear avoidance is prognostic for more pain, disability and not returning to work. Lack of leisure-time physical activity predicts long-term sickness absence. The purpose of this study is to compare effectiveness of 6-month neuromuscular exercise and counselling in treating

BMJ open sport & exercise medicine2016 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

95. Do rocker-sole shoes influence postural stability in chronic low back pain? A randomised trial.

Do rocker-sole shoes influence postural stability in chronic low back pain? A randomised trial. 27900198 2016 11 30 2017 02 20 2055-7647 2 1 2016 BMJ open sport & exercise medicine BMJ Open Sport Exerc Med Do rocker-sole shoes influence postural stability in chronic low back pain? A randomised trial. e000170 People with chronic low back pain (CLBP) demonstrate greater postural instability compared with asymptomatic individuals. Rocker-sole shoes are inherently unstable and may serve (...) 16311036 Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1995 Oct;76(10):961-5 7487439 Clin J Pain. 2005 Jul-Aug;21(4):323-9 15951650 Gait Posture. 2009 Apr;29(3):460-4 19167891 Gait Posture. 2009 Apr;29(3):421-7 19084411 Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1991 Mar;16(3):325-30 1827539 Joint Bone Spine. 2011 May;78(3):291-7 20971670 Clin J Sport Med. 2009 Nov;19(6):464-70 19898073 Eur Spine J. 2011 Mar;20(3):358-68 20721676 Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2004 Mar 15;29(6):E107-12 15014284 BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2011 Jul 15;12:162 21762484

BMJ open sport & exercise medicine2016 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

96. Back schools for the treatment of chronic low back pain: possibility of benefit but no convincing evidence after 47 years of research-systematic review and meta-analysis

Back schools for the treatment of chronic low back pain: possibility of benefit but no convincing evidence after 47 years of research-systematic review and meta-analysis 27257858 2016 09 20 2017 02 24 1872-6623 157 10 2016 Oct Pain Pain Back schools for the treatment of chronic low back pain: possibility of benefit but no convincing evidence after 47 years of research-systematic review and meta-analysis. 2160-72 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000640 Back schools are interventions that comprise (...) exercise and education components. We aimed to systematically review the randomized controlled trial evidence on back schools for the treatment of chronic low back pain. By searching MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Central as well as bibliographies, we identified 31 studies for inclusion in our systematic review and 5 of these for inclusion in meta-analyses. Meta-analyses for pain scores and functional outcomes revealed statistical superiority of back schools vs no intervention for some comparisons

EvidenceUpdates2016

97. Sterile water injections for acute low back pain

Sterile water injections for acute low back pain Sterile water injections for acute low back pain » Morsels of Evidence Search Evidence based medicine for general practitioners « » Oct 10 Sterile water injections for acute low back pain Categories: , , by Journal reference: Cui JZ, Geng ZS, Zhang YH, Feng JY, Zhu P, Zhang XB. Effects of intracutaneous injections of sterile water in patients with acute low back pain: a randomized, controlled, clinical trial. Braz J Med Biol Res 2016 Mar;49(3 (...) ) Link: Published: March 2016 Evidence cookie says… Sterile water injections are of uncertain value in acute low back pain. Routine use of this intervention cannot be recommended based on a single study that has important threats to its internal validity. It may have a role in patients who consent after being informed to its uncertain value. Clinical scenario Ahmed, a 25-year-old builder recently presented with acute low back pain. I recalled a discussion on the GPs Down Under forum that lamented

Morsels of Evidence2016

98. Sterile water injections for acute low back pain

Sterile water injections for acute low back pain Sterile water injections for acute low back pain – Morsels of Evidence \t\t\t\r\n\t\t\t \t\t\t\r\n\t\t\t Like this: Like Loading... ","author":{"@type":"Person","name":"Michael Tam"},"image":["https:\/\/evidencebasedmedicine.com.au\/wp-content\/uploads\/2016\/10\/cover-mo-oct2016-p62-3.png"]} Toggle search form Toggle navigation Evidence-based medicine for general practitioners Oct 10 2016 Sterile water injections for acute low back pain (...) By in , , Journal reference: Cui JZ, Geng ZS, Zhang YH, Feng JY, Zhu P, Zhang XB. Effects of intracutaneous injections of sterile water in patients with acute low back pain: a randomized, controlled, clinical trial. Braz J Med Biol Res 2016 Mar;49(3) Link: Published: March 2016 Evidence cookie says… Sterile water injections are of uncertain value in acute low back pain. Routine use of this intervention cannot be recommended based on a single study that has important threats to its internal validity. It may have

Morsels of Evidence2016

99. Non-specific low back pain.

Non-specific low back pain. Non-specific low back pain affects people of all ages and is a leading contributor to disease burden worldwide. Management guidelines endorse triage to identify the rare cases of low back pain that are caused by medically serious pathology, and so require diagnostic work-up or specialist referral, or both. Because non-specific low back pain does not have a known pathoanatomical cause, treatment focuses on reducing pain and its consequences. Management consists (...) of education and reassurance, analgesic medicines, non-pharmacological therapies, and timely review. The clinical course of low back pain is often favourable, thus many patients require little if any formal medical care. Two treatment strategies are currently used, a stepped approach beginning with more simple care that is progressed if the patient does not respond, and the use of simple risk prediction methods to individualise the amount and type of care provided. The overuse of imaging, opioids

Lancet2016

100. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Gluteal Trigger Points to Differentiate Radicular From Nonradicular Low Back Pain

The Diagnostic Accuracy of Gluteal Trigger Points to Differentiate Radicular From Nonradicular Low Back Pain 26491935 2016 07 07 2016 07 07 1536-5409 32 8 2016 Aug The Clinical journal of pain Clin J Pain The Diagnostic Accuracy of Gluteal Trigger Points to Differentiate Radicular From Nonradicular Low Back Pain. 666-72 10.1097/AJP.0000000000000311 Low back pain (LBP) is highly prevalent and costly to the society. Previous studies have shown an association between radicular LBP and trigger (...) points (TrPs) in the superior-lateral quadrant of the gluteal area (GTrP). The objective of current study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of GTrP to predict nerve root involvement among patients with LBP. In a prospective, diagnostic accuracy study 325 consecutive patients with LBP were recruited. At first step, patients were evaluated for the presence or absence of the GTrP. A different investigator, blinded to the GTrP findings, then performed history taking and physical examination

EvidenceUpdates2016