Latest & greatest articles for lorazepam

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Top results for lorazepam

21. Continuous infusions of lorazepam, midazolam, and propofol for sedation of the critically ill surgery trauma patient: a prospective, randomized comparison

Continuous infusions of lorazepam, midazolam, and propofol for sedation of the critically ill surgery trauma patient: a prospective, randomized comparison Continuous infusions of lorazepam, midazolam, and propofol for sedation of the critically ill surgery trauma patient: a prospective, randomized comparison Continuous infusions of lorazepam, midazolam, and propofol for sedation of the critically ill surgery trauma patient: a prospective, randomized comparison McCollam J S, O'Neil M G, Norcross (...) E D, Byrne T K, Reeves S T Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The study compared continuous infusions of lorazepam, midazolam and propofol for the sedation of mechanically-ventilated, critically ill trauma

1999 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

22. Lorazepam for the prevention of recurrent seizures related to alcohol. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Lorazepam for the prevention of recurrent seizures related to alcohol. Alcohol abuse is one of the most common causes of seizures in adults. In a randomized, double-blind study, we compared lorazepam with placebo for the prevention of recurrent seizures related to alcohol. Over a 21-month period, we studied consecutive patients with chronic alcohol abuse who were at least 21 years of age and who presented to the emergency departments of two hospitals in Boston after a witnessed, generalized (...) seizure. The patients were randomly assigned to receive either 2 mg of lorazepam in 2 ml of normal saline or 4 ml of normal saline intravenously and then observed for six hours. The primary end point was the occurrence of a second seizure during the observation period.Of the 229 patients who were initially evaluated, 186 met the entry criteria. In the lorazepam group, 3 of 100 patients (3 percent) had a second seizure, as compared with 21 of 86 patients (24 percent) in the placebo group (odds ratio

1999 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high

23. Double-blind study of lorazepam and diazepam in status epilepticus. (Abstract)

Double-blind study of lorazepam and diazepam in status epilepticus. Lorazepam was compared with diazepam for the treatment of status epilepticus in a double-blind, randomized trial. Seventy-eight patients with 81 episodes were enrolled. Patients received one or two doses of either 4 mg of lorazepam or 10 mg of diazepam intravenously. Seizures were controlled in 89% of the episodes treated with lorazepam and in 76% treated with diazepam. The times for onset of action of the medications did (...) not differ significantly. Adverse effects occurred in 13% of the lorazepam-treated patients and in 12% of the diazepam-treated patients. Respiratory depression and arrest, the most frequent adverse effects, were treated symptomatically; no adverse sequelae were noted.

1983 JAMA Controlled trial quality: uncertain