Latest & greatest articles for lithium

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Top results for lithium

61. Comparison of standard and low serum levels of lithium for maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder.

Comparison of standard and low serum levels of lithium for maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder. 2811970 1989 12 18 1989 12 18 2016 10 19 0028-4793 321 22 1989 Nov 30 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Comparison of standard and low serum levels of lithium for maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder. 1489-93 In recent years, lower serum levels have been recommended for maintenance therapy with lithium. We studied 94 patients with bipolar disorder in a randomized, double (...) -blind, prospective trial of two different doses of lithium for maintenance therapy: the "standard" dose, adjusted to achieve a serum lithium concentration of 0.8 to 1.0 mmol per liter, and a "low" dose, resulting in a serum concentration of 0.4 to 0.6 mmol per liter. The group medians of the patients' average serum lithium levels were 0.83 mmol per liter for the patients in the standard-range group and 0.54 mmol per liter for those in the low-range group. Six of 47 patients (13 percent) assigned

NEJM1989

62. Rapid recurrence of mania following abrupt discontinuation of lithium.

Rapid recurrence of mania following abrupt discontinuation of lithium. 2898622 1988 08 10 1988 08 10 2015 06 16 0140-6736 2 8601 1988 Jul 02 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Rapid recurrence of mania following abrupt discontinuation of lithium. 15-7 Fourteen patients with a history of mania satisfying DSM-III criteria were entered into a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial, spending four weeks on each of lithium and placebo. All patients had been well and stable on lithium (...) for at least 18 months and were not taking any other psychotropic drugs. Seven patients (50%) had a relapse of their manic illness and a further two had to be withdrawn because they recognised signs of incipient relapse. One of these became overtly manic after restarting lithium. The seven definite and the two possible relapses occurred in the placebo phase; this finding was unlikely to have arisen by chance. The relapses started 13-19 days after placebo substitution. These results have important

Lancet1988

63. Lithium carbonate in the treatment of thyrotoxicosis. A controlled trial.

Lithium carbonate in the treatment of thyrotoxicosis. A controlled trial. 55890 1976 04 30 1976 04 30 2015 11 19 0140-6736 1 7960 1976 Mar 20 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Lithium carbonate in the treatment of thyrotoxicosis. A controlled trial. 603-5 Of 24 patients with newly diagnosed thyrotoxicosis, 13 were randomly selected for treatment with methimazole 40 mg per day, and 11 for treatment with lithium carbonate in such doses that the serum lithium lay between 0-5 and 1-3 meq. per litre (...) . The lithium treatment brought about a fall in serum-thyroxine iodine (T4I) of 27.0%, and in the free-thyroxine index (F.T.I.) of 38.1% after 10 days. A comparison of the two patient groups with regard to the fall in F.T.I. after 3 and 10 days showed no statistically significant difference; similarly the calculated confidence limits appeared to exclude any difference of clinical importance. 8 of the 11 patients subjected to lithium treatment had side-effects, so that the general condition, which

Lancet1976

64. Prophylactic treatment of alcoholism by lithium carbonate. A controlled study.

Prophylactic treatment of alcoholism by lithium carbonate. A controlled study. 74457 1978 03 21 1978 03 21 2015 06 16 0140-6736 1 7984 1976 Sep 04 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Prophylactic treatment of alcoholism by lithium carbonate. A controlled study. 481-2 Lithium therapy has been shown to have a therapeutic influence in reducing the drinking and incapacity by alcohol in depressive alcoholics in a prospective double-blind placebo-controlled trial conducted over one year, but it had (...) no significant effect on non-depressed patients. Patients in the trial treated by placebo had significantly greater alcoholic morbidity if they were depressive than if they were non-depressive. Merry J J Reynolds C M CM Bailey J J Coppen A A eng Clinical Trial Comparative Study Journal Article Randomized Controlled Trial England Lancet 2985213R 0140-6736 0 Placebos 9FN79X2M3F Lithium AIM IM Adult Alcohol Drinking Alcoholism drug therapy Clinical Trials as Topic Depression chemically induced prevention

Lancet1976