Latest & greatest articles for irritable bowel syndrome

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Top results for irritable bowel syndrome

41. Probiotics for antibiotic-associated diarrhea, clostridium difficile infection and irritable bowel syndrome: a review of clinical evidence and safety

Probiotics for antibiotic-associated diarrhea, clostridium difficile infection and irritable bowel syndrome: a review of clinical evidence and safety Probiotics for antibiotic-associated diarrhea, clostridium difficile infection and irritable bowel syndrome: a review of clinical evidence and safety Probiotics for antibiotic-associated diarrhea, clostridium difficile infection and irritable bowel syndrome: a review of clinical evidence and safety CADTH Record Status (...) This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation CADTH. Probiotics for antibiotic-associated diarrhea, clostridium difficile infection and irritable bowel syndrome: a review of clinical evidence and safety. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). Rapid Response - Summary with Critical Appraisal. 2013 Authors' conclusions A large body

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2014

42. Low-FODMAP diets : irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

Low-FODMAP diets : irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) RACGP - Low-FODMAP diets : irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) Username Password Password security changes or call 1800 284 789 Search the RACGP website Your browser has 'Cookies' disabled, alert boxes will continue to appear without this feature. / / / / / Low-FODMAP diets : irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) HANDI Making non-drug interventions easier to find and use Low-FODMAP diets : irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) Intervention A nutritionally balanced (...) diet that is low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) for adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Basis of the intervention FODMAPs are fermentable, osmotically active, short-chain carbohydrates that are either not absorbed or only slowly absorbed in the small intestine. The unabsorbed carbohydrates, along with osmotically trapped water and electrolytes, enter the colon where they are rapidly fermented by bacteria to short-chain fatty acids

Handbook of Non-Drug interventions (HANDI)2014

43. Pharmacological Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Pharmacological Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Pharmacological Management of IBS Email Address Password Remember me Not a member? Article Pharmacological Management of IBS 2015-04-15 17:57:06 UTC Article Outline Abbreviations used in this paper: ( ), ( ), ( ), ( ), ( ), ( ), ( ) This document presents the official recommendations of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) on the use of pharmacological agents for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in adults (...) Gastroenterological Association technical review on the pharmacological management of irritable bowel syndrome. Gastroenterology . 2014 ; 147 : 1149—1172 4 Optimal understanding of this guideline will be enhanced by reading applicable portions of the technical review. Table 1 GRADE Quality of Evidence, Strength of Recommendations, and Implications Implications of strong and conditional (weak) guideline recommendations • Strong recommendations ° Patients: Most people in this situation would want the recommended

American Gastroenterological Association Institute2014

44. Linaclotide (Constella) - Symptomatic treatment of moderate to severe irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) in adults

Linaclotide (Constella) - Symptomatic treatment of moderate to severe irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) in adults

Scottish Medicines Consortium2013

45. Long-Term Success of GUT-Directed Group Hypnosis for Patients With Refractory Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Long-Term Success of GUT-Directed Group Hypnosis for Patients With Refractory Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial 23419384 2013 04 04 2013 06 04 2013 04 04 1572-0241 108 4 2013 Apr The American journal of gastroenterology Am. J. Gastroenterol. Long-term success of GUT-directed group hypnosis for patients with refractory irritable bowel syndrome: a randomized controlled trial. 602-9 10.1038/ajg.2013.19 Gut-directed hypnotherapy (GHT) in individual sessions is highly effective (...) in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This study aimed to assess the long-term effect of GHT in group sessions for refractory IBS. A total of 164 patients with IBS (Rome-III-criteria) were screened, and 100 refractory to usual treatment were randomized 1:1 either to supportive talks with medical treatment (SMT) or to SMT with GHT (10 weekly sessions within 12 weeks). The primary end point was a clinically important improvement on several dimensions of daily life (assessed by IBS impact scale

EvidenceUpdates2013

46. The Efficacy of a Diet Low in Fermentable Sugars in the Reduction of Symptoms for Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

The Efficacy of a Diet Low in Fermentable Sugars in the Reduction of Symptoms for Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome "The Efficacy of a Diet Low in Fermentable Sugars in the Reduction of S" by Odessa Steigleder < > > > > > Title Author Date of Award Summer 8-10-2013 Degree Type Capstone Project Degree Name Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies Rights . Abstract Background : Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder, affecting 7-10% of the worldwide population (...) . It consists of abdominal pain and altered bowel habits present for at least three months. Poorly absorbed, short-chain carbohydrates are grouped based on chain length and result in the acronym FODMAP: fermentable oligo-, di-, mono-, and polyols. These FODMAPs pass through the small bowel unabsorbed and may be affecting symptoms in those with IBS. Does a diet low in fermentable sugars improve symptoms for patients with IBS? Method : An exhaustive literature search was conducted using Medline, CINAHL

Pacific University EBM Capstone Project2013

47. Irritable bowel syndrome

Irritable bowel syndrome Irritable bowel syndrome - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Irritable bowel syndrome - Summary Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic, relapsing, and often lifelong disorder of gastrointestinal function with no discernible structural or biochemical cause. It is characterized by: The presence of abdominal pain/discomfort associated with, or relieved by, defecation. A change in bowel habit, with constipation, diarrhoea, or both constipation and diarrhoea (...) . Abdominal bloating. A diagnosis of IBS should be considered in a person who has had any of the following symptoms for at least 6 months: Abdominal pain or discomfort, or Bloating, or Change in bowel habit. The diagnosis is confirmed if abdominal discomfort or pain which is either relieved by defecation, or associated with altered bowel frequency or altered stool form and at least two of the following symptoms are also present: Altered stool passage (straining, urgency, incomplete evacuation). Abdominal

NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries2013

49. Evaluation of harm in the pharmacotherapy of irritable bowel syndrome

Evaluation of harm in the pharmacotherapy of irritable bowel syndrome Evaluation of harm in the pharmacotherapy of irritable bowel syndrome Evaluation of harm in the pharmacotherapy of irritable bowel syndrome Shah E, Kim S, Chong K, Lembo A, Pimentel M CRD summary Tricyclic antidepressants and alosetron were associated with significant numbers needed to harm, compared with rifaximin, for diarrhoea. Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors and lubiprostone seemed to be safe, for constipation (...) . The authors' conclusions reflected the evidence presented, but lack of quality assessment, different trial lengths, and small samples in some trials mean that the reliability of the results is unclear. Authors' objectives To compare the number needed to harm for drug interventions for patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Searching MEDLINE (1950 to April 2011), EMBASE (1980 to April 2011) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched, without language restrictions

DARE.2012

50. A 12-Week, Randomized, Controlled Trial With a 4-Week Randomized Withdrawal Period to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Linaclotide in Irritable Bowel Syndrome With Constipation

A 12-Week, Randomized, Controlled Trial With a 4-Week Randomized Withdrawal Period to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Linaclotide in Irritable Bowel Syndrome With Constipation 22986440 2013 01 08 2013 02 11 2015 02 23 1572-0241 107 11 2012 Nov The American journal of gastroenterology Am. J. Gastroenterol. A 12-week, randomized, controlled trial with a 4-week randomized withdrawal period to evaluate the efficacy and safety of linaclotide in irritable bowel syndrome with constipation. 1714-24 (...) ; quiz p.1725 Linaclotide is a minimally absorbed guanylate cyclase-C agonist. The objective of this trial was to determine the efficacy and safety of linaclotide in patients with irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C). This phase 3, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial randomized IBS-C patients to placebo or 290 μ g oral linaclotide once daily in a 12-week treatment period, followed by a 4-week randomized withdrawal (RW) period. There were four primary end points

EvidenceUpdates2012 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

51. Linaclotide for Irritable Bowel Syndrome With Constipation: A 26-Week, Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety

Linaclotide for Irritable Bowel Syndrome With Constipation: A 26-Week, Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety 22986437 2013 01 08 2013 02 11 2014 03 07 1572-0241 107 11 2012 Nov The American journal of gastroenterology Am. J. Gastroenterol. Linaclotide for irritable bowel syndrome with constipation: a 26-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate efficacy and safety. 1702-12 Linaclotide is a minimally absorbed peptide (...) guanylate cyclase-C agonist. The objective of this trial was to determine the efficacy and safety of linaclotide treatment in patients with irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) over 26 weeks. This phase 3, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial randomized IBS-C patients to placebo or 290 μg of oral linaclotide once daily for a 26-week treatment period. The primary and the secondary efficacy assessments were evaluated over the first 12 weeks of treatment. Primary end points

EvidenceUpdates2012

52. Hydrogen breath test for irritable bowel syndrome

Hydrogen breath test for irritable bowel syndrome Hydrogen breath test for irritable bowel syndrome Hydrogen breath test for irritable bowel syndrome Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Hydrogen breath test for irritable bowel syndrome. Lansdale: HAYES, Inc.. Directory Publication. 2012 Authors' conclusions The hydrogen breath test (HBT) involves (...) obtaining breath samples before and at timed intervals after ingesting a carbohydrate substrate and analyzing these samples for hydrogen (H2) content. Intestinal bacteria ferment the carbohydrate, producing the only source of bodily H2, which is expelled in the breath. The pattern and degree of expelled H2 may indicate the presence of particular gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic GI disorder that is diagnosed only by symptoms but shares symptoms with other GI

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2012

53. Should I Consider Antibiotics in My Patient with Irritable Bowel Syndrome?

Should I Consider Antibiotics in My Patient with Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Should I Consider Antibiotics in My Patient with Irritable Bowel Syndrome? | Clinical Correlations Should I Consider Antibiotics in My Patient with Irritable Bowel Syndrome? July 26, 2012 By Jason Chalifoux Faculty Peer Review The story of a patient with multiple office visits due to uncontrolled abdominal pain, bloating and diarrhea/constipation is common among primary care doctors and gastroenterologists. The workup (...) is often extensive and rules out many etiologies. After discovering no metabolic, inflammatory, or anatomic pathology, physicians use the Rome III criteria to diagnose irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is a functional bowel disorder that is diagnosed by symptoms of recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort for at least 3 days per month in the last 3 months and associated with 2 or more of the following: 1) improvement with defecation, 2) onset associated with a change in frequency of stool, or 3) onset

Clinical Correlations2012

54. Cost-effectiveness of acupuncture for irritable bowel syndrome: findings from an economic evaluation conducted alongside a pragmatic randomised controlled trial in primary care

Cost-effectiveness of acupuncture for irritable bowel syndrome: findings from an economic evaluation conducted alongside a pragmatic randomised controlled trial in primary care Cost-effectiveness of acupuncture for irritable bowel syndrome: findings from an economic evaluation conducted alongside a pragmatic randomised controlled trial in primary care Cost-effectiveness of acupuncture for irritable bowel syndrome: findings from an economic evaluation conducted alongside a pragmatic randomised (...) with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The authors concluded that acupuncture was not cost-effective for all patients, but it might be for a subgroup of patients with more severe disease. The methods and data used for the analysis were clearly reported and appropriate. The authors' conclusion appears to be appropriate. Type of economic evaluation Cost-utility analysis Study objective This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture for patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Interventions

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2012

55. The efficacy and safety of rifaximin for the irritable bowel syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis

The efficacy and safety of rifaximin for the irritable bowel syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis The efficacy and safety of rifaximin for the irritable bowel syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis The efficacy and safety of rifaximin for the irritable bowel syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis Menees SB, Maneerattannaporn M, Kim HM, Chey WD CRD summary The authors concluded that treatment with rifaximin was more effective than placebo for global symptoms (...) and bloating in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. The modest therapeutic gain was similar to that of other therapies. The authors' conclusion for short-term treatment compared with placebo reflects the evidence presented and seems reliable; the comparison with other treatments is not substantiated. Authors' objectives To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of rifaximin in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Searching PubMed, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library and Web of Science were searched up

DARE.2012

56. Systematic review with meta-analysis: In irritable bowel syndrome, antispasmodics and antidepressants improve abdominal pain and global assessment and symptom scores, but there is no evidence for the effectiveness of bulking agents

Systematic review with meta-analysis: In irritable bowel syndrome, antispasmodics and antidepressants improve abdominal pain and global assessment and symptom scores, but there is no evidence for the effectiveness of bulking agents In irritable bowel syndrome, antispasmodics and antidepressants improve abdominal pain and global assessment and symptom scores, but there is no evidence for the effectiveness of bulking agents | Evidence-Based Medicine This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse (...) the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here In irritable bowel syndrome, antispasmodics and antidepressants improve abdominal pain

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2012

57. Linaclotide improves abdominal pain and bowel habits in a phase IIb study of patients with irritable bowel syndrome with constipation

Linaclotide improves abdominal pain and bowel habits in a phase IIb study of patients with irritable bowel syndrome with constipation 20801122 2010 12 03 2011 01 04 2010 12 03 1528-0012 139 6 2010 Dec Gastroenterology Gastroenterology Linaclotide improves abdominal pain and bowel habits in a phase IIb study of patients with irritable bowel syndrome with constipation. 1877-1886.e2 10.1053/j.gastro.2010.08.041 Linaclotide, a minimally absorbed, 14-amino acid peptide agonist of guanylate cyclase-C (...) , has shown benefit in a proof-of-concept study for the treatment of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with constipation (IBS-C). We assessed the efficacy and safety of linaclotide at a daily dose range of 75-600 μg in IBS-C. We performed a randomized, double-blind, multicenter, placebo-controlled study of 420 patients with IBS-C given oral linaclotide at doses of 75, 150, 300, or 600 μg or placebo once daily for 12 weeks. End points included change from baseline in daily bowel habits

EvidenceUpdates2011

58. Rifaximin therapy for patients with irritable bowel syndrome without constipation.

Rifaximin therapy for patients with irritable bowel syndrome without constipation. 21208106 2011 01 06 2011 01 12 2015 06 24 1533-4406 364 1 2011 Jan 06 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Rifaximin therapy for patients with irritable bowel syndrome without constipation. 22-32 10.1056/NEJMoa1004409 Evidence suggests that gut flora may play an important role in the pathophysiology of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We evaluated rifaximin, a minimally absorbed antibiotic (...) , as treatment for IBS. In two identically designed, phase 3, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials (TARGET 1 and TARGET 2), patients who had IBS without constipation were randomly assigned to either rifaximin at a dose of 550 mg or placebo, three times daily for 2 weeks, and were followed for an additional 10 weeks. The primary end point, the proportion of patients who had adequate relief of global IBS symptoms, and the key secondary end point, the proportion of patients who had adequate relief of IBS

NEJM2011

59. Chenodeoxycholate in females with irritable bowel syndrome-constipation: a pharmacodynamic and pharmacogenetic analysis

Chenodeoxycholate in females with irritable bowel syndrome-constipation: a pharmacodynamic and pharmacogenetic analysis 20691689 2010 11 01 2010 11 30 2016 12 15 1528-0012 139 5 2010 Nov Gastroenterology Gastroenterology Chenodeoxycholate in females with irritable bowel syndrome-constipation: a pharmacodynamic and pharmacogenetic analysis. 1549-58, 1558.e1 10.1053/j.gastro.2010.07.052 Sodium chenodeoxycholate (CDC) accelerates colonic transit in health. Our aim was to examine pharmacodynamics (...) (colonic transit, bowel function) and pharmacogenetics of CDC in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-C). In a double-blind placebo-controlled study, 36 female patients with IBS-C were randomized to treatment with delayed-release oral formulations of placebo, 500 mg CDC, or 1000 mg CDC for 4 days. We assessed gastrointestinal and colonic transit, stool characteristics, and associations of transit with fasting serum 7αC4 (surrogate of bile acid synthesis) and FGF19 (negative regulator

EvidenceUpdates2010 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

60. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of St John`s wort for treating irritable bowel syndrome

A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of St John`s wort for treating irritable bowel syndrome 19809408 2010 01 07 2010 02 25 2010 11 04 1572-0241 105 1 2010 Jan The American journal of gastroenterology Am. J. Gastroenterol. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of St John's wort for treating irritable bowel syndrome. 170-7 10.1038/ajg.2009.577 St John's wort (SJW) is known to effectively treat patients with mild-to-moderate depression. Antidepressants (...) are frequently used to treat irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To date, no study that examines the efficacy of SJW in IBS has been carried out. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of SJW in IBS after 12 weeks. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 70 participants with an established diagnosis of IBS were randomized and assigned by concealed allocation to either SJW or placebo. Both treatment arms were balanced on symptom subtype. The primary end point was self-reported

EvidenceUpdates2010