Latest & greatest articles for irritable bowel syndrome

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Top results for irritable bowel syndrome

221. Psychological treatments for irritable bowel syndrome: a critique of controlled treatment trials

Psychological treatments for irritable bowel syndrome: a critique of controlled treatment trials Psychological treatments for irritable bowel syndrome: a critique of controlled treatment trials Psychological treatments for irritable bowel syndrome: a critique of controlled treatment trials Talley N J, Owen B K, Boyce P, Paterson K Authors' objectives To determine whether psychological treatments are of value in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Searching The studies were identified by searching (...) issues in the future should lead to a better understanding of the place of psychological treatments in IBS. The authors provide a list of recommendations (Table 6), based on their results, to assist those who may wish to design future trials in this field. Bibliographic details Talley N J, Owen B K, Boyce P, Paterson K. Psychological treatments for irritable bowel syndrome: a critique of controlled treatment trials. American Journal of Gastroenterology 1996; 91(2): 277-286 PubMedID Indexing Status

1996 DARE.

222. Individual and group hypnotherapy in treatment of refractory irritable bowel syndrome. (Abstract)

Individual and group hypnotherapy in treatment of refractory irritable bowel syndrome. 33 patients with refractory irritable bowel syndrome were treated with four 40-minute sessions of hypnotherapy over 7 weeks. 20 improved, 11 of whom lost almost all their symptoms. Short-term improvement was maintained for 3 months without further formal treatment. Hypnotherapy in groups of up to 8 patients was as effective as individual therapy.

1989 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

223. Controlled trial of hypnotherapy in the treatment of severe refractory irritable-bowel syndrome. (Abstract)

Controlled trial of hypnotherapy in the treatment of severe refractory irritable-bowel syndrome. 30 patients with severe refractory irritable-bowel syndrome were randomly allocated to treatment with either hypnotherapy or psychotherapy and placebo. The psychotherapy patients showed a small but significant improvement in abdominal pain, abdominal distension, and general well-being but not in bowel habit. The hypnotherapy patients showed a dramatic improvement in all features, the difference

1984 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

224. Controlled study of psychotherapy in irritable bowel syndrome. (Abstract)

Controlled study of psychotherapy in irritable bowel syndrome. 101 outpatients with irritable bowel syndrome were randomly allocated to two treatment groups. Both groups received the same medical treatment, but patients in one group also received dynamically oriented individual psychotherapy in ten hour-long sessions spread over 3 months. After 3 months there was a significantly greater improvement in somatic symptoms in the psychotherapy group. The difference became more pronounced a year

1983 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

225. Food hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome. (Abstract)

Food hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome. Food hypersensitivity as a cause of abdominal symptoms was investigated by means of exclusion diets and double-blind food provocation in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Twenty-seven patients entered the study; nineteen complied with dietary manipulation. Food hypersensitivity as a cause of their presenting symptoms was confirmed by double-blind food provocation in only three patients, who also had evidence of associated atopic disease

1983 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

226. Food intolerance: a major factor in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome. (Abstract)

Food intolerance: a major factor in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome. Specific foods were found to provoke symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in 14 of 21 patients. In 6 patients who were challenged double blind the food intolerance was confirmed. No difference was detected in changes in plasma glucose, histamine, immune complexes, haematocrit, eosinophil count, or breath hydrogen excretion produced after challenge or control foods. Rectal prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), however

1982 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

227. Wheat fibre and irritable bowel syndrome. A controlled trial. (Abstract)

Wheat fibre and irritable bowel syndrome. A controlled trial. Twenty-six patients with irritable bowel syndrome entered a controlled trial of diets with a high or low wheat-fibre content. After 6 weeks on the high-wheat fibre regimen there was significant improvement in symptoms and an objective change in colonic motor activity. No such improvement occurred on the low-fibre regimen. Patients with irritable bowel syndrome should be encouraged to increase their daily intake of wheat fibre.

1977 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

228. A double-blind trial of the effect of wheat bran on symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. (Abstract)

A double-blind trial of the effect of wheat bran on symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. 59 outpatients with irritable bowel syndrome participated in a randomised double-blind trial. The patients in the treatment group received three biscuits daily each containing 10 g of ordinary miller's bran, whereas the patients in the control group received wheat biscuits of a similar appearance. The treatment period was 6 weeks. 52% of the patients in the treatment group noted subjective improvement (...) compared with 65% in the control group. The results of this trial do not support the routine use of miller's bran in irritable bowel syndrome.

1976 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain