Latest & greatest articles for insulin

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Top results for insulin

861. Depletion and disruption of dietary fibre. Effects on satiety, plasma-glucose, and serum-insulin. (Abstract)

Depletion and disruption of dietary fibre. Effects on satiety, plasma-glucose, and serum-insulin. Ten normal subjects ingested test meals based on apples, each containing 60 g available carbohydrate. Fibre-free juice could be consumed eleven times faster than intact apples and four times faster than fibre-disrupted purée. Satiety was assessed numerically. With the rate of ingestion equalised, juice was significantly less satisfying than purée, and purée than apples. Plasma-glucose rose (...) to similar levels after all three meals. However, there was a striking rebound fall after juice, and to a lesser extent after purée, which was not seen after apples. Serum-insulin rose to higher levels after juice and purée than after apples. The removal of fibre from food, and also its physical disruption, can result in faster and easier ingestion, decreased satiety, and disturbed glucose homoeostasis which is probably due to inappropriate insulin release. These effects favour overnutrition

1977 Lancet

862. Diabetic ketoacidosis: low-dose insulin therapy by various routes. (Abstract)

Diabetic ketoacidosis: low-dose insulin therapy by various routes. Since in normal persons the hypoglycemic effect of low-dose intramuscular exceeds that of subcutaneous insulin we studied the effect of routes of insulin therapy in diabetic ketoacidosis. Forty-five patients with diabetic ketoacidosis entered a randomized prospective protocol with insulin administered either intravenously, subcutaneously or intramuscularly. Initial priming dose of insulin had to be repeated in two of 15, three (...) insulin therapy for diabetic ketoacidosis and indicate that the optimal route of insulin administration is by initial intravenous combined with subcutaneous or intramuscular.

1977 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain

863. Insulin in the management of the diabetic surgical patient: continuous intravenous infusion vs subcutaneous administration. (Abstract)

Insulin in the management of the diabetic surgical patient: continuous intravenous infusion vs subcutaneous administration. A prospective randomized study comparing constant intravenous infusion of regular, low-dose insulin versus conventional subcutaneous administration of neutral protein Hagedorn (NPH) insulin in insulin-requiring patients undergoing orthopedic procedures under general anesthesia was undertaken. The degree of diabetic control was better in those receiving constant 2 units (...) /hour of regular insulin than in those receiving two thirds of daily maintenance doses of NPH insulin. However, in two of eight patients receiving 2 units/hour, decreased insulin infusion rates and increased dextrose infusion rates were required to avoid hypoglycemia. Preoperative NPH insulin and 1 unit/hour insulin administration resulted in equivalent diabetic control.

1977 JAMA Controlled trial quality: uncertain