Latest & greatest articles for inequality

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Top results for inequality

1. Key policies for addressing the social determinants of health and health inequities

Key policies for addressing the social determinants of health and health inequities Matthew Saunders | Ben Barr | Phil McHale | Christoph Hamelmann HEALTH EVIDENCE NETWORK SYNTHESIS REPORT 52 Key policies for addressing the social determinants of health and health inequitiesThe Health Evidence Network HEN – the Health Evidence Network – is an information service for public health decision-makers in the WHO European Region, in action since 2003 and initiated and coordinated by the WHO Regional (...) in 2003 through a Memorandum of Agreement between the Government of Italy, the Veneto Region and the WHO Regional Office for Europe. Health Evidence Network synthesis report 52 Key policies for addressing the social determinants of health and health inequities Matthew Saunders | Ben Barr | Phil McHale | Christoph HamelmannAbstract Evidence indicates that actions within four main themes (early child development, fair employment and decent work, social protection, and the living environment) are likely

2017 WHO Health Evidence Network

2. Community engagement: improving health and wellbeing and reducing health inequalities

Community engagement: improving health and wellbeing and reducing health inequalities Community engagement: impro Community engagement: improving ving health and wellbeing and reducing health health and wellbeing and reducing health inequalities inequalities NICE guideline Published: 4 March 2016 nice.org.uk/guidance/ng44 © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility (...) and to reduce health inequalities. Nothing in this guideline should be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with complying with those duties. Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Community engagement: improving health and wellbeing and reducing health inequalities (NG44) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject

2016 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

3. Which service or policy mechanisms, models or approaches, have been shown to be effective or ineffective at reducing inequalities in access to health and social care services?

Which service or policy mechanisms, models or approaches, have been shown to be effective or ineffective at reducing inequalities in access to health and social care services? Knowledge & Library Services (KLS) Evidence Briefing Which service or policy mechanisms, models or approaches, have been shown to be effective or ineffective at reducing inequalities in access to health and social care services? Anh Tran 26 th October 2018 Which service or policy mechanisms, models or approaches, have (...) been shown to be effective or ineffective at reducing inequalities in access to health and social care services? KLS Evidence Briefing 26 th Oct 2018 Question This briefing summarises the evidence on the interventions, models and approaches to reduce inequalities in access to health and social care services (HSC), from January 2010 - September 2018. Key messages ? Collaborations are the key to successfully tackling inequalities in HSC access. ? People’s needs are better met when they are involved

2018 Public Health England - Evidence Briefings

4. What is the evidence on the reduction of inequalities in accessibility and quality of maternal health care delivery for migrants? A review of the existing evidence in the WHO European Region

What is the evidence on the reduction of inequalities in accessibility and quality of maternal health care delivery for migrants? A review of the existing evidence in the WHO European Region What is the evidence on the reduction of inequalities in accessibility and quality of maternal health care delivery for migrants? A review of the existing evidence in the WHO European Region HEALTH EVIDENCE NETWORK SYNTHESIS REPORT 45 Ines Keygnaert | Olena Ivanova | Aurore Guieu | An-Sofie Van Parys | Els (...) is the evidence on the reduction of inequalities in accessibility and quality of maternal health care delivery for migrants? A review of the existing evidence in the WHO European Region Ines Keygnaert | Olena Ivanova | Aurore Guieu | An-Sofie Van Parys | Els Leye | Kristien RoelensAbstract The number of female migrants of childbearing age is rapidly increasing, which poses specific maternal health needs. Via a systematic academic literature review and a critical interpretive synthesis of policy frameworks

2016 WHO Health Evidence Network

5. COVID-19 and mitigating impact on health inequalities

COVID-19 and mitigating impact on health inequalities COVID-19 and mitigating impact on health inequalities | RCP London Menu Education & Practice Events Video About us Who we are What we do Who's who Get involved Menu COVID-19 and mitigating impact on health inequalities Details Date: 3 April 2020 Policy team Email: , a community of practice supported by Public Health England. As highlighted by ‘ , health is affected by the environment and community in which we live. The more deprived the area (...) , the shorter the life expectancy and the poorer the state of health within these shorter lives. The diagram below illustrates how some groups within the population may be disproportionately affected by COVID-19. There are clear reasons for giving consideration and support to those groups that experience health inequalities. The economic and social response to COVID-19 has the potential to exacerbate these health inequalities. Those in low paid or insecure work, or with existing health conditions or who

2020 Royal College of Physicians

6. Which service or policy mechanisms, models or approaches, have been shown to be effective or ineffective at reducing the inequalities that are known to have an impact on childhood obesity?

Which service or policy mechanisms, models or approaches, have been shown to be effective or ineffective at reducing the inequalities that are known to have an impact on childhood obesity? Knowledge & Library Services (KLS) Evidence Briefing Which service or policy mechanisms, models or approaches, have been shown to be effective or ineffective at reducing the inequalities that are known to have an impact on childhood obesity? Nicola Pearce-Smith 19th October 2018 Which service or policy (...) mechanisms, models or approaches, have been shown to be effective or ineffective at reducing the inequalities that are known to have an impact on childhood obesity? KLS Evidence Briefing 19 th October 2018 Question This briefing summarises the evidence (from January 1 st 2011 to October 9 th 2018) on the approaches and interventions that may reduce the inequalities that impact on obesity in childhood. Key messages ? there was limited evidence that some individual and community based interventions may

2018 Public Health England - Evidence Briefings

7. Which service delivery mechanisms, models or approaches have been shown to be effective or ineffective at reducing the inequalities that older people experience?

Which service delivery mechanisms, models or approaches have been shown to be effective or ineffective at reducing the inequalities that older people experience? Knowledge & Library Services (KLS) Evidence Briefing Which service delivery mechanisms, models or approaches have been shown to be effective or ineffective at reducing the inequalities that older people experience? Caroline De Brún 4 th October 2018 Which service or policy interventions, models or approaches, have been shown (...) to be effective or ineffective at reducing inequalities in access to health and social care services? Which service or policy mechanisms, models or approaches, have been shown to be effective or ineffective at reducing inequalities in access to health and social care services? 28 th Sept 2018 Question This briefing summarises the evidence, from 01/01/2010 to 04/10/18, on service delivery mechanisms, models or approaches that have been shown to be effective or ineffective at reducing the inequalities

2018 Public Health England - Evidence Briefings

8. Which service delivery mechanisms, models or approaches have been shown to be effective at reducing educational inequalities in early years?

Which service delivery mechanisms, models or approaches have been shown to be effective at reducing educational inequalities in early years? Knowledge & Library Services (KLS) Evidence Briefing Which service delivery mechanisms, models or approaches have been shown to be effective at reducing educational inequalities in early years? Alyson Hyland, Nicola Pearce-Smith 15 th November 2018 Which service delivery mechanisms, models or approaches have been shown to be effective at reducing (...) educational inequalities in early years? KLS Evidence Briefing 15 th November 2018 Research question This briefing summarises the evidence, from 01/01/2010 to 04/10/18, on service delivery mechanisms, models or approaches that have been shown to be effective at reducing educational inequalities in early years. Key messages ? vulnerable or disadvantaged children benefit from early learning and childcare (ELC) when it is provided in socially mixed groups ? high-quality early childhood education (ECE) has

2018 Public Health England - Evidence Briefings

9. Study protocol for the optimisation, feasibility testing and pilot cluster randomised trial of Positive Choices: a school-based social marketing intervention to promote sexual health, prevent unintended teenage pregnancies and address health inequalities Full Text available with Trip Pro

Study protocol for the optimisation, feasibility testing and pilot cluster randomised trial of Positive Choices: a school-based social marketing intervention to promote sexual health, prevent unintended teenage pregnancies and address health inequalities Since the introduction of the Teenage Pregnancy Strategy (TPS), England's under-18 conception rate has fallen by 55%, but a continued focus on prevention is needed to maintain and accelerate progress. The teenage birth rate remains higher

2018 Pilot and feasibility studies Controlled trial quality: uncertain

10. Inequality

Inequality Top results for inequality - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Find evidence fast ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4 (...) ) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for inequality The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

11. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of a Mobile Mammography Unit for Breast Cancer Screening to Reduce Geographic and Social Health Inequalities. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of a Mobile Mammography Unit for Breast Cancer Screening to Reduce Geographic and Social Health Inequalities. Breast cancer is the leading cancer in terms of incidence and mortality among women in France. Effective organized screening does exist, however, the participation rate is low, and negatively associated with a low socioeconomic status and remoteness.To determine the cost-effectiveness of a mobile mammography (MM) program to increase participation in breast (...) increase participation in breast cancer screening and reduce geographic and social inequalities while being more cost-effective in remote areas and in deprived areas. Because of the retrospective design, further research is needed to provide more evidence of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of using a MMU for organized breast cancer screening and to determine the optimal conditions for implementing it.Copyright © 2019 ISPOR–The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research

2019 Value in Health

12. A geospatial approach to understanding inequalities in accessibility to primary care among vulnerable populations. Full Text available with Trip Pro

A geospatial approach to understanding inequalities in accessibility to primary care among vulnerable populations. Many Canadians experience unequal access to primary care services, despite living in a country with a universal health care system. Health inequalities affect all Canadians but have a much stronger impact on the health of vulnerable populations. Health inequalities are preventable differences in the health status or distribution of health resources as experienced by vulnerable

2019 PLoS ONE

13. Investigating inequities in hospital care among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals using social media. (Abstract)

Investigating inequities in hospital care among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals using social media. Persons who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) face health inequities due to unwarranted discrimination against their sexual orientation or identity. An important contributor to LGBT health disparities is the inequitable or substandard care that LGBT individuals receive from hospitals.To investigate inequities in hospital care among LGBT patients

2018 Social Science & Medicine

14. Social determinants of health inequalities. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Social determinants of health inequalities. The gross inequalities in health that we see within and between countries present a challenge to the world. That there should be a spread of life expectancy of 48 years among countries and 20 years or more within countries is not inevitable. A burgeoning volume of research identifies social factors at the root of much of these inequalities in health. Social determinants are relevant to communicable and non-communicable disease alike. Health status

2005 Lancet

15. Education is a modifiable risk factor: let’s look to improving education to rid ourselves of health inequities

Education is a modifiable risk factor: let’s look to improving education to rid ourselves of health inequities Education is a modifiable risk factor: let’s look to improving education to rid ourselves of health inequities | BJSM blog - social media's leading SEM voice by By Dr. Scott Lear As thousands of students return to school this September to learn about the three Rs (reading, writing and arithmetic), we should add another R to the list: reducing disease and death. When it comes to health

2019 British Journal of Sports Medicine Blog

16. Health Inequalities, Poverty and Healthcare surrounding Kidney Care for Young People

Health Inequalities, Poverty and Healthcare surrounding Kidney Care for Young People Health Inequalities, Poverty and Healthcare surrounding Kidney Care for Young People | Evidence-Based Nursing blog by This week’s Blog is written by: Christine H 1 , Gardner V 2 , Gardner J 3 1 Kidney Disease and Renal Support for Kids (KDARs), England UK @TheRPSG 2,3 The Renal Patient Support Group (RPSG), England UK Introduction In reference to Our Children are Suffering (1 st September 2019 – see: ), yes (...) , it is crucial to highlight – we now live in a busier time; plans and schedules have become intricate and expanded – our energy seems to be zapped enduring health and social care challenges. It is also correct to highlight that use of technology (i.e. smartphones, mobile health, apps, internet use and social media) can all increase stress and impede negatively on wellbeing. However, health inequalities, and poverty across the UK has increased irrespective of advances in technology and it affects everyone

2019 Evidence-Based Nursing blog

17. The use of folic acid, iron salts and other vitamins by pregnant women in the 2015 Pelotas birth cohort: is there socioeconomic inequality? Full Text available with Trip Pro

The use of folic acid, iron salts and other vitamins by pregnant women in the 2015 Pelotas birth cohort: is there socioeconomic inequality? Many low- and middle-income countries recommend micronutrient supplements for pregnant women to improve their nutritional status, prevent possible deficiencies and avoid fetal healgth consequences. This study evaluated the influence of socioeconomic status on the use of folic acid, iron salts and other vitamins and minerals among pregnant women in the 2015 (...) who were more highly educated and had a higher family income.Although folic acid and other vitamins and minerals were more frequently used in white, richer and more educated mothers, which indicates inequality, iron supplements were more frequently used in the poorer, less educated nonwhite mothers, suggesting the opposite association for this supplement.

2019 BMC Public Health

18. How does perinatal maternal mental health explain early social inequalities in child behavioural and emotional problems? Findings from the Wirral Child Health and Development Study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

How does perinatal maternal mental health explain early social inequalities in child behavioural and emotional problems? Findings from the Wirral Child Health and Development Study. This study aimed to assess how maternal mental health mediates the association between childhood socio-economic conditions at birth and subsequent child behavioural and emotional problem scores.Analysis of the Wirral Child Health and Development Study (WCHADS), a prospective epidemiological longitudinal study (...) % of this was explained by maternal perinatal mental health. Policies supporting maternal mental health in pregnancy are important to address the early emergence of inequalities in child mental health.

2019 PLoS ONE

19. Personalisation schemes in social care: are they growing social and health inequalities? Full Text available with Trip Pro

Personalisation schemes in social care: are they growing social and health inequalities? The connection between choice, control and health is well established in the literature on the social determinants of health, which includes choice and control of vital health and social services. However, even in the context of universal health and social care schemes, the ability to exercise choice and control can be distributed unequally. This paper uses the case of the Australian National Disability (...) or enable the ability of individuals to exercise choice within personalised care schemes.We show how social determinants of health at the individual level can collide with the complexity of policy delivery systems to entrench health inequalities.Many social policy reforms internationally focus on improving empowerment through enabling choice and control. However, if administrative systems do not take account of existing structural inequities, then such schemes are likely to entrench or grow social

2019 BMC Public Health

20. Examining emergency department inequities: Do they exist? Full Text available with Trip Pro

Examining emergency department inequities: Do they exist? Ethnic inequities in health outcomes have been well documented with Indigenous peoples experiencing a high level of healthcare need, yet low access to, and through, high-quality healthcare services. Despite Māori having a high ED use, few studies have explored the potential for ethnic inequities in emergency care within New Zealand (NZ). Healthcare delivery within an ED context is characterised by time-pressured, relatively brief (...) , complex and demanding environments. When clinical decision-making occurs in this context, provider prejudice, stereotyping and bias are more likely. The examining emergency department inequities (EEDI) research project aims to investigate whether clinically important ethnic inequities between Māori and non-Māori exist.EEDI is a retrospective observational study examining ED admissions in NZ between 2006 and 2012 (5 976 126 ED events). EEDI has been designed from a Kaupapa Māori Research position.The

2019 Emergency medicine Australasia