Latest & greatest articles for inequality

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on inequality or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on inequality and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for inequality

101. Do area-based urban regeneration initiatives improve health, wellbeing and reduce health inequalities? A systematic review of quantitative evidence 2000-2017

Do area-based urban regeneration initiatives improve health, wellbeing and reduce health inequalities? A systematic review of quantitative evidence 2000-2017 Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr

2017 PROSPERO

102. The effects of community pharmacy public health interventions on population health and health inequalities: an umbrella review

The effects of community pharmacy public health interventions on population health and health inequalities: an umbrella review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne

2017 PROSPERO

103. Socioeconomic inequalities in congenital heart disease survival

Socioeconomic inequalities in congenital heart disease survival Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing and effect measures

2017 PROSPERO

104. Closing the disparity gap. Post-recession tobacco control and social inequality: a systematic review

Closing the disparity gap. Post-recession tobacco control and social inequality: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web

2017 PROSPERO

105. Does routine screening for cardiovascular risk factors widen socioeconomic inequalities in health? A systematic review

Does routine screening for cardiovascular risk factors widen socioeconomic inequalities in health? A systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence

2017 PROSPERO

106. Effect of public health interventions on socioeconomic inequalities in childhood obesity

Effect of public health interventions on socioeconomic inequalities in childhood obesity Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing

2017 PROSPERO

107. A systematic review of the relationship between non-combustible tobacco products, harm reduction and socioeconomic inequalities in combustible tobacco use in countries at stage 4 of the tobacco epidemic

A systematic review of the relationship between non-combustible tobacco products, harm reduction and socioeconomic inequalities in combustible tobacco use in countries at stage 4 of the tobacco epidemic Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files

2017 PROSPERO

108. Age-related inequalities in the receipt of treatment for pancreatic cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Age-related inequalities in the receipt of treatment for pancreatic cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence

2017 PROSPERO

109. The contribution of work-related factors to social inequalities in perceived health: a systematic review

The contribution of work-related factors to social inequalities in perceived health: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web

2017 PROSPERO

110. Socioeconomic inequality and utilization of dental services: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Socioeconomic inequality and utilization of dental services: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web

2017 PROSPERO

111. Socioeconomic inequality and oral health-related quality of life: a systematic review

Socioeconomic inequality and oral health-related quality of life: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing

2017 PROSPERO

112. The impact of cash transfers on social determinants of health and health inequalities in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review

The impact of cash transfers on social determinants of health and health inequalities in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne

2017 PROSPERO

113. Age-related inequalities in receipt of treatment for colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Age-related inequalities in receipt of treatment for colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation

2017 PROSPERO

114. Socioeconomic health inequalities, their variation across countries, welfare regimes and methodological concepts: a meta-analysis (protocol)

Socioeconomic health inequalities, their variation across countries, welfare regimes and methodological concepts: a meta-analysis (protocol) Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne

2017 PROSPERO

115. Social Determinants of Health in the United States: Addressing Major Health Inequality Trends for the Nation, 1935-2016 Full Text available with Trip Pro

Social Determinants of Health in the United States: Addressing Major Health Inequality Trends for the Nation, 1935-2016 This study describes key population health concepts and examines major empirical trends in US health and healthcare inequalities from 1935 to 2016 according to important social determinants such as race/ethnicity, education, income, poverty, area deprivation, unemployment, housing, rural-urban residence, and geographic location.Long-term trend data from the National Vital (...) Statistics System, National Health Interview Survey, National Survey of Children's Health, American Community Survey, and Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were used to examine racial/ethnic, socioeconomic, rural-urban, and geographic inequalities in health and health care. Life tables, age-adjusted rates, prevalence, and risk ratios were used to examine health differentials, which were tested for statistical significance at the 0.05 level.Life expectancy of Americans increased from 69.7 years

2017 International journal of MCH and AIDS

116. Socioeconomic inequality in morbid obesity with body mass index more than 40 kg/m2 in the United States and England Full Text available with Trip Pro

Socioeconomic inequality in morbid obesity with body mass index more than 40 kg/m2 in the United States and England This study evaluated socioeconomic inequality in morbid obesity (body mass index, BMI ≥40 kg/m2) through an analysis of population health survey data in the United States (US) and England (UK).We analysed data for the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the Health Survey for England for 2011 to 2014. Age-adjusted odds ratios (AOR) were used to evaluate income (...) - and education-inequality.There were 26,898 eligible UK and 10,628 US participants. Morbid obesity was more frequent in women than men, and higher in the US than the UK (men: US, 4.8%; UK, 1.7%; women US, 9.6%; UK, 3.7%). In the UK, morbid obesity showed graded income-inequality in both genders (AOR, for lowest income quintile: men, 1.83, 95% confidence interval 1.16 to 2.88; women, 2.18, 1.55 to 3.07), as well as education-inequality (AOR for no school qualifications, men 2.57, 1.64 to 4.02; women, 2.18

2016 SSM - population health

117. Consideration of health inequalities in systematic reviews: a mapping review of guidance. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Consideration of health inequalities in systematic reviews: a mapping review of guidance. Given that we know that interventions shown to be effective in improving the health of a population may actually widen the health inequalities gap while others reduce it, it is imperative that all systematic reviewers consider how the findings of their reviews may impact (reduce or increase) on the health inequality gap. This study reviewed existing guidance on incorporating considerations of health (...) inequalities in systematic reviews in order to examine the extent to which they can help reviewers to incorporate such issues.A mapping review was undertaken to identify guidance documents that purported to inform reviewers on whether and how to incorporate considerations of health inequalities. Searches were undertaken in Medline, CINAHL and The Cochrane Library Methodology Register. Review guidance manuals prepared by international organisations engaged in undertaking systematic reviews

2016 Systematic Reviews

118. Explaining racial and ethnic inequalities in postpartum allostatic load: Results from a multisite study of low to middle income woment Full Text available with Trip Pro

Explaining racial and ethnic inequalities in postpartum allostatic load: Results from a multisite study of low to middle income woment Racial and ethnic inequalities in women's health are widely documented, but not for the postpartum period, and few studies examine whether neighborhood, psychosocial, and biological factors explain these gaps in women's health.Using prospective longitudinal data collected from 1766 low to middle income women between 2008 and 2012 by the Community Child Health (...) for Latinas compared to Whites.Racial and ethnic inequalities in AL were accounted for largely by household poverty with additional contributions by psychological, economic, neighbourhood and medical variables. There remained a significant inequality between African American, and Latina women as compared to Whites even after adjustment for this set of variables. Future research into health inequalities among women should include a fuller consideration of the social determinants of health including

2016 SSM - population health

119. An agent-based simulation of persistent inequalities in health behavior: Understanding the interdependent roles of segregation, clustering, and social influence Full Text available with Trip Pro

An agent-based simulation of persistent inequalities in health behavior: Understanding the interdependent roles of segregation, clustering, and social influence Health inequalities are conspicuously persistent through time and often durable even in spite of interventions. In this study, I use agent-based simulation models (ABMs) to understand how the complex interrelationships between residential segregation, social network formation, group-level preferences, and social influence may contribute (...) to this persistence. I use a more-stylized ABM, Bubblegum Village (BV), to understand how initial inequalities in bubblegum-chewing behaviors either endure, increase, or decrease over time given group-level differences in preferences, neighborhood-level barriers or facilitators of bubblegum chewing (e.g., access to bubblegum shops), and agents' preferences for segregation, homophily, and clustering (i.e., the 'tightness' of social networks). I further use BV to understand whether segregation and social network

2016 SSM - population health

120. Increasing inequality in age of death at shared levels of life expectancy: A comparative study of Scotland and England and Wales Full Text available with Trip Pro

Increasing inequality in age of death at shared levels of life expectancy: A comparative study of Scotland and England and Wales There is a strong negative correlation between increasing life expectancy and decreasing lifespan variation, a measure of inequality. Previous research suggests that countries achieving a high level of life expectancy later in time generally do so with lower lifespan variation than forerunner countries. This may be because they are able to capitalise on lessons (...) already learnt. However, a few countries achieve a high level of life expectancy later in time with higher inequality. Scotland appears to be such a country and presents an interesting case study because it previously experienced lower inequality when reaching the same level of life expectancy as its closest comparator England and Wales. We calculated life expectancy and lifespan variation for Scotland and England and Wales for the years 1950 to 2012, comparing Scotland to England and Wales when

2016 SSM - population health