Latest & greatest articles for inequality

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Top results for inequality

101. Explaining educational inequalities in preterm birth: the generation r study

Explaining educational inequalities in preterm birth: the generation r study 18562446 2008 12 23 2009 02 03 2008 12 23 1468-2052 94 1 2009 Jan Archives of disease in childhood. Fetal and neonatal edition Arch. Dis. Child. Fetal Neonatal Ed. Explaining educational inequalities in preterm birth: the generation r study. F28-34 10.1136/adc.2007.136945 Although a low socioeconomic status has consistently been associated with an increased risk of preterm birth, little is known about the pathways (...) % CI 0.66 to 1.84)). Pregnant women with a low educational level have a nearly twofold higher risk of preterm birth than women with a high educational level. This elevated risk could largely be explained by pregnancy characteristics, indicators of psychosocial well-being, and lifestyle habits. Apparently, educational inequalities in preterm birth go together with an accumulation of multiple adverse circumstances among women with a low education. A number of explanatory mechanisms unravelled

EvidenceUpdates2009

102. [The state of research into inequalities in the incidence, death, prevention and healthcare in cancer in Spain. A bibliometric study and literature review.]

[The state of research into inequalities in the incidence, death, prevention and healthcare in cancer in Spain. A bibliometric study and literature review.] Investigacion en Espana sobre desigualdades en la incidencia, mortalidad, prevencion y atencion del cancer. Estudio bibliometrico y de revision de la literatura. [The state of research into inequalities in the incidence, death, prevention and healthcare in cancer in Spain. A bibliometric study and literature review.] Investigacion en Espana (...) sobre desigualdades en la incidencia, mortalidad, prevencion y atencion del cancer. Estudio bibliometrico y de revision de la literatura. [The state of research into inequalities in the incidence, death, prevention and healthcare in cancer in Spain. A bibliometric study and literature review.] Aguado Romeo MJ, Marquez Calderon S, Rohlfs I, Sarmiento Gonzalez-Nieto V. Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2009

103. Inequalities and the mental health of young people: a systematic review of secondary school-based cognitive behavioural interventions

Inequalities and the mental health of young people: a systematic review of secondary school-based cognitive behavioural interventions School-based cognitive-behavioural interventions: a systematic review of effects and inequalities 25 March 2017 Links Download report (pdf) Inequalities and the mental health of young people: a systematic review of secondary school-based cognitive behavioural interventions What do we want to know? Health inequalities are recognised as an important problem both (...) nationally and internationally. The research literature which demonstrates the complex interactions between the key axes of social differences in populations including class, education, occupation, income/assets, gender, ethnicity; in relation to health outcomes is yet to be matched by a strong body of evidence of what works to reduce health inequalities. Systematic reviewers wanting to examine how interventions impact upon gaps and gradients have been hampered by a lack of tested tools and methods

EPPI Centre2009

104. Inequalities and the mental health of young people: a systematic review of secondary school-based cognitive behavioural interventions

Inequalities and the mental health of young people: a systematic review of secondary school-based cognitive behavioural interventions Inequalities and the mental health of young people: a systematic review of secondary school-based cognitive behavioural interventions Inequalities and the mental health of young people: a systematic review of secondary school-based cognitive behavioural interventions Kavanagh J, Oliver S, Caird J, Tucker H, Greaves A, Harden A, Oakley A, Lorenc T, Thomas J CRD (...) health educational programmes and explore the impact of these interventions on inequalities in young people's mental health. Searching MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, ERIC, Social Science Citation Index, ASSIA, Trials Register of Public Health Interventions (TROPHI), Database of Public Health Effectiveness Reviews (DOPHER), C2-SPECTR and PsiTri were searched for English-language articles published from 1996 onwards. Various websites were searched, references from relevant

DARE.2009

105. Health promotion, inequalities and young people's health: a systematic review or research

Health promotion, inequalities and young people's health: a systematic review or research Health promotion, inequalities and young people 28 March 2017 Links Download report (pdf) Health promotion, inequalities and young people's health: a systematic review of research What do we want to know? Health inequalities are recognised as an important problem nationally and internationally. There is policy interest in improving the health of the most disadvantaged, reducing the gap between the most (...) and least disadvantaged, and reducing gradients across the whole population. Health inequalities arise from variations in social, economic and environmental influences along the life course. Health promotion, particularly when it uses social and structural interventions developed by multi-disciplinary teams working with young people, not merely for them, has the potential to reduce health inequalities among young people immediately, and in their later lives. This study describes how much health

EPPI Centre2009

106. Improving partnership working to reduce health inequalities

Improving partnership working to reduce health inequalities Improving partnership working to reduce health inequalities | The King's Fund Fill 1 Main navigation Health and care services Leadership, systems and organisations Patients, people and society Policy, finance and performance Search term Apply Improving partnership working to reduce health inequalities This content relates to the following topics: Share this content ). Governance and accountability are most important in delivering (...) be helpful if central government demonstrated how effective partnership working can be, thereby setting a good example for those working locally. Above all, we need to be clear about what partnerships are trying to achieve. Only then are we likely to have partnerships that truly make a difference to health inequalities. Tammy Boyce is a research fellow in public health at The King's Fund. Professor David Hunter is Professor of Health Policy and Management at Durham University. Comments Add your comment

The King's Fund2009

107. Strategic review of health inequalities in England post-2010 (Marmot Review)

Strategic review of health inequalities in England post-2010 (Marmot Review) Strategic review of health inequalities in England post-2010 (Marmot Review) | The King's Fund Fill 1 Main navigation Health and care services Leadership, systems and organisations Patients, people and society Policy, finance and performance Search term Apply Strategic review of health inequalities in England post-2010 (Marmot Review) Consultation response This content relates to the following topics: Share (...) this content This paper is a response to the Marmot Review consultation. It provides a comprehensive analysis of the proposals to reduce health inequalities and a range of evidence to underpin future health policy and action. The Marmot Review helps to clarify the role of the Department of Health and the NHS in reducing health inequalities. This is welcome guidance as the role that the NHS can play in doing so is often vague. Related content You may also be interested in Quick links Connect with us Latest

The King's Fund2009

108. Inequalities in healthy life years in the 25 countries of the European Union in 2005: a cross-national meta-regression analysis.

Inequalities in healthy life years in the 25 countries of the European Union in 2005: a cross-national meta-regression analysis. BACKGROUND: Although life expectancy in the European Union (EU) is increasing, whether most of these extra years are spent in good health is unclear. This information would be crucial to both contain health-care costs and increase labour-force participation for older people. We investigated inequalities in life expectancies and healthy life years (HLYs) at 50 years (...) positively associated with HLYs at 50 years in men and women (p<0.039 for both indicators and sexes); however, in men alone, long-term unemployment was negatively associated (p=0.023) and life-long learning positively associated (p=0.021) with HLYs at 50 years of age. INTERPRETATION: Substantial inequalities in HLYs at 50 years exist within EU countries. Our findings suggest that, without major improvements in population health, the target of increasing participation of older people into the labour

Lancet2008

109. Best-practice interventions to reduce socioeconomic inequalities of coronary heart disease mortality in UK: a prospective occupational cohort study.

Best-practice interventions to reduce socioeconomic inequalities of coronary heart disease mortality in UK: a prospective occupational cohort study. BACKGROUND: How much the successful implementation of the most effective (ie, best-practice) interventions could reduce socioeconomic inequalities of coronary heart disease mortality is not known. We assessed this issue in an occupational cohort study comparing low with high socioeconomic groups. METHODS: We undertook a prospective cohort study

Lancet2008

110. Addressing social determinants of health inequities: what can the state and civil society do?

Addressing social determinants of health inequities: what can the state and civil society do? In this Health Policy article, we selected and reviewed evidence synthesised by nine knowledge networks established by WHO to support the Commission on the Social Determinants of Health. We have indicated the part that national governments and civil society can play in reducing health inequity. Government action can take three forms: (1) as provider or guarantor of human rights and essential services (...) and civil society can have important positive roles in addressing health inequity if political will exists.

Lancet2008

111. Effect of exposure to natural environment on health inequalities: an observational population study.

Effect of exposure to natural environment on health inequalities: an observational population study. BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that exposure to the natural environment, or so-called green space, has an independent effect on health and health-related behaviours. We postulated that income-related inequality in health would be less pronounced in populations with greater exposure to green space, since access to such areas can modify pathways through which low socioeconomic position can lead (...) confounding factors. We used stratified models to identify the nature of this variation. FINDINGS: The association between income deprivation and mortality differed significantly across the groups of exposure to green space for mortality from all causes (p<0.0001) and circulatory disease (p=0.0212), but not from lung cancer or intentional self-harm. Health inequalities related to income deprivation in all-cause mortality and mortality from circulatory diseases were lower in populations living

Lancet2008

112. Effect of financial incentives on inequalities in the delivery of primary clinical care in England: analysis of clinical activity indicators for the quality and outcomes framework.

Effect of financial incentives on inequalities in the delivery of primary clinical care in England: analysis of clinical activity indicators for the quality and outcomes framework. BACKGROUND: The quality and outcomes framework is a financial incentive scheme that remunerates general practices in the UK for their performance against a set of quality indicators. Incentive schemes can increase inequalities in the delivery of care if practices in affluent areas are more able to respond (...) to the incentives than are those in deprived areas. We examined the relation between socioeconomic inequalities and delivered quality of clinical care in the first 3 years of this scheme. METHODS: We analysed data extracted automatically from clinical computing systems for 7637 general practices in England, data from the UK census, and data for characteristics of practices and patients from the 2006 general medical statistics database. Practices were grouped into equal-sized quintiles on the basis of area

Lancet2008

113. Socioeconomic inequalities in health in 22 European countries.

Socioeconomic inequalities in health in 22 European countries. BACKGROUND: Comparisons among countries can help to identify opportunities for the reduction of inequalities in health. We compared the magnitude of inequalities in mortality and self-assessed health among 22 countries in all parts of Europe. METHODS: We obtained data on mortality according to education level and occupational class from census-based mortality studies. Deaths were classified according to cause, including common (...) causes, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer; causes related to smoking; causes related to alcohol use; and causes amenable to medical intervention, such as tuberculosis and hypertension. Data on self-assessed health, smoking, and obesity according to education and income were obtained from health or multipurpose surveys. For each country, the association between socioeconomic status and health outcomes was measured with the use of regression-based inequality indexes. RESULTS: In almost all

NEJM2008

114. The contribution of job characteristics to socioeconomic inequalities in incidence of myocardial infarction

The contribution of job characteristics to socioeconomic inequalities in incidence of myocardial infarction 18331774 2008 05 05 2008 08 26 2008 05 05 0277-9536 66 11 2008 Jun Social science & medicine (1982) Soc Sci Med The contribution of job characteristics to socioeconomic inequalities in incidence of myocardial infarction. 2240-52 10.1016/j.socscimed.2008.01.049 The current study estimated the contribution of job characteristics to socioeconomic inequalities in incidence

EvidenceUpdates2008

115. Inequity of access to investigation and effect on clinical outcomes: prognostic study of coronary angiography for suspected stable angina pectoris.

Inequity of access to investigation and effect on clinical outcomes: prognostic study of coronary angiography for suspected stable angina pectoris. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether coronary angiography for suspected stable angina pectoris is underused in older patients, women, south Asian patients, and those from socioeconomically deprived areas, and, if it is, whether this is associated with higher coronary event rates. DESIGN: Multicentre cohort with five year follow-up. SETTING: Six

BMJ2008 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

116. Inequalities in mortality during and after restructuring of the New Zealand economy: repeated cohort studies.

Inequalities in mortality during and after restructuring of the New Zealand economy: repeated cohort studies. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether disparities between income and mortality changed during a period of major structural and macroeconomic reform and to estimate the changing contribution of different diseases to these disparities. DESIGN: Repeated cohort studies. DATA SOURCES: 1981, 1986, 1991, 1996, and 2001 censuses linked to mortality data. Population Total New Zealand population, ages (...) 1-74 years. METHODS: Mortality rates standardised for age and ethnicity were calculated for each census cohort by level of household income. Standardised rate differences and rate ratios, and slope and relative indices of inequality (SII and RII), were calculated to measure disparities on both absolute and relative scales. RESULTS: All cause mortality rates declined over the 25 year study period in all groups stratified by sex, age, and income, except for 25-44 year olds of both sexes on low

BMJ2008 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

117. Population tobacco control interventions and their effects on social inequalities in smoking

Population tobacco control interventions and their effects on social inequalities in smoking Population tobacco control interventions and their effects on social inequalities in smoking Population tobacco control interventions and their effects on social inequalities in smoking Centre for Reviews and Dissemination CRD summary This well-conducted review assessed the effects of population level tobacco control interventions on smoking related health inequalities. The authors concluded (...) that these interventions have the potential to reduce health inequalities for disadvantaged groups. A need for further rigorous research in a number of specific areas was identified. Given the level of evidence presented, the authors' conclusions are likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effects of population tobacco control interventions on social inequalities of smoking. Searching BIOSIS Previews, CINAHL, Cochrane library, EMBASE, EconLit, HMIC, HTA, ISI Technology Assessment database, MEDLINE

DARE.2008

118. Population tobacco control interventions and their effects on social inequalities in smoking

Population tobacco control interventions and their effects on social inequalities in smoking Population tobacco control interventions and their effects on social inequalities in smoking Population tobacco control interventions and their effects on social inequalities in smoking Fayter D, Main C, Misso K, Ogilvie D, Petticrew M, Sowden A, Stirk L, Thomas S, Whitehead M, Worthy G Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA (...) . No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Fayter D, Main C, Misso K, Ogilvie D, Petticrew M, Sowden A, Stirk L, Thomas S, Whitehead M, Worthy G. Population tobacco control interventions and their effects on social inequalities in smoking. York: University of York. CRD Report 39. 2008 Authors' objectives The overall aims of this project were: To synthesise the best available evidence about the differential effects of population tobacco control interventions

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2008

119. Child wellbeing and income inequality in rich societies: ecological cross sectional study.

Child wellbeing and income inequality in rich societies: ecological cross sectional study. OBJECTIVES: To examine associations between child wellbeing and material living standards (average income), the scale of differentiation in social status (income inequality), and social exclusion (children in relative poverty) in rich developed societies. DESIGN: Ecological, cross sectional studies. SETTING: Cross national comparisons of 23 rich countries; cross state comparisons within the United States (...) . POPULATION: Children and young people. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The Unicef index of child wellbeing and its components for rich countries; eight comparable measures for the US states and District of Columbia (teenage births, juvenile homicides, infant mortality, low birth weight, educational performance, dropping out of high school, overweight, mental health problems). RESULTS: The overall index of child wellbeing was negatively correlated with income inequality (r=-0.64, P=0.001) and percentage

BMJ2007 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

120. The global impact of income inequality on health by age: an observational study.

The global impact of income inequality on health by age: an observational study. OBJECTIVES: To explore whether the apparent impact of income inequality on health, which has been shown for wealthier nations, is replicated worldwide, and whether the impact varies by age. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: 126 countries of the world for which complete data on income inequality and mortality by age and sex were available around the year 2002 (including 94.4% of world human population). DATA (...) SOURCES: Data on mortality were from the World Health Organization and income data were taken from the annual reports of the United Nations Development Programme. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mortality in 5-year age bands for each sex by income inequality and income level. RESULTS: At ages 15-29 and 25-39 variations in income inequality seem more closely correlated with mortality worldwide than do variations in material wealth. This relation is especially strong among the poorest countries in Africa

BMJ2007 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro