Latest & greatest articles for inequality

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Top results for inequality

81. Community engagement to reduce inequalities in health: a systematic review, meta-analysis and economic analysis

Community engagement to reduce inequalities in health: a systematic review, meta-analysis and economic analysis Community engagement to reduce inequalities in health: a systematic review, meta-analysis and economic analysis Community engagement to reduce inequalities in health: a systematic review, meta-analysis and economic analysis O'Mara-Eves A, Brunton G, McDaid D, Oliver S, Kavanagh J, Jamal F, Matosevic T, Harden A, Thomas J Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published (...) health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation O'Mara-Eves A, Brunton G, McDaid D, Oliver S, Kavanagh J, Jamal F, Matosevic T, Harden A, Thomas J. Community engagement to reduce inequalities in health: a systematic review, meta-analysis and economic analysis. Public Health Research 2013; 1(4) Authors' objectives To undertake a multimethod systematic review which builds on the evidence that underpins

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2013

82. Community engagement to reduce inequalities in health: a systematic review, meta-analysis and economic analysis

Community engagement to reduce inequalities in health: a systematic review, meta-analysis and economic analysis Community engagement to reduce inequalities in health: a systematic review, meta-analysis and economic analysis Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information

NIHR HTA programme2013

83. Ethnicity, detention and early intervention: reducing inequalities and improving outcomes for black and minority ethnic patients: the ENRICH programme, a mixed-methods study

Ethnicity, detention and early intervention: reducing inequalities and improving outcomes for black and minority ethnic patients: the ENRICH programme, a mixed-methods study Ethnicity, detention and early intervention: reducing inequalities and improving outcomes for black and minority ethnic patients: the ENRICH programme, a mixed-methods study Journals Library An error has occurred in processing the XML document An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page

NIHR HTA programme2013 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

84. Persistent social inequalities in health: Insensitive outcomes, inadequate policies, or both?

Persistent social inequalities in health: Insensitive outcomes, inadequate policies, or both? Persistent social inequalities in health: Insensitive outcomes, inadequate policies, or both? | SCPHRP Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research & Policy Publication Information Date of Publication 01/03/2013 Link and The . SCPHRP is located within . Copyright © 2017 The University of Edinburgh. All rights reserved. . Site published by the , Information Services, .

Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research & Policy2013 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

85. A cross-sectional pilot study of the Scottish early development instrument: a tool for addressing inequality

A cross-sectional pilot study of the Scottish early development instrument: a tool for addressing inequality A cross-sectional pilot study of the Scottish early development instrument: a tool for addressing inequality | SCPHRP Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research & Policy Publication Information Date of Publication 17/12/2013 Link and The . SCPHRP is located within . Copyright © 2017 The University of Edinburgh. All rights reserved. . Site published by the , Information Services, .

Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research & Policy2013

86. Identifying appropriate methods to incorporate concerns about health inequalities into economic evaluations of health care programmes

Identifying appropriate methods to incorporate concerns about health inequalities into economic evaluations of health care programmes First page footer Identifying appropriate methods to incorporate concerns about health inequalities into economic evaluations of health care programmes Final Report 3.02.14 Susan Griffin 1 ; Miqdad Asaria 1 ; Richard Cookson 1 ; Mark Sculpher 1 . 1 Centre for Health Economics, University of York The work was undertaken by the authors as part of the Public Health (...) Detailed description of project findings 9 2 Contribution to Consortium themes 9 2.1 Health inequalities 9 2.1.1 Methodological development 9 2.1.2 Translation to policy 9 References 10 Outputs / Dissemination 11 4 What this study adds: ? Reducing health inequality is a recognised goal of public policy, but changes to health inequality are not commonly incorporated in economic evaluations ? This study shows how health inequality impacts can be incorporated in economic evaluation in a way that clarifies

Public Health Research Consortium2013

87. Impact on health inequalities of rising prosperity in England 1998-2007, and implications for performance incentives: longitudinal ecological study.

Impact on health inequalities of rising prosperity in England 1998-2007, and implications for performance incentives: longitudinal ecological study. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the uneven rise in prosperity between 1999 and 2008 accounted for differential increases in life expectancy in English local authorities. DESIGN: Longitudinal ecological study. SETTING: 324 local authorities in England, classified by their baseline level of deprivation. M: ain outcome measures Multivariable (...) regression was used to investigate the association between trends in prosperity between 1998 and 2007 and trends in life expectancy. Trends in health inequalities were assessed by comparing the experience of Spearhead local authorities (the 70 most deprived in 1998) with the average for all English local authorities. RESULTS: Those local authorities that experienced the greatest improvement in prosperity experienced greater increases in life expectancy. With each 1% absolute decline in unemployment, life

BMJ2012 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

88. Use of relative and absolute effect measures in reporting health inequalities: structured review.

Use of relative and absolute effect measures in reporting health inequalities: structured review. OBJECTIVE: To examine the frequency of reporting of absolute and relative effect measures in health inequalities research. DESIGN: Structured review of selected general medical and public health journals. DATA SOURCES: 344 articles published during 2009 in American Journal of Epidemiology, American Journal of Public Health, BMJ, Epidemiology, International Journal of Epidemiology, JAMA, Journal (...) . CONCLUSIONS: Health inequalities are most commonly reported using only relative measures of effect, which may influence readers' judgments of the magnitude, direction, significance, and implications of reported health inequalities.

BMJ2012 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

89. Contribution of modifiable risk factors to social inequalities in type 2 diabetes: prospective Whitehall II cohort study.

Contribution of modifiable risk factors to social inequalities in type 2 diabetes: prospective Whitehall II cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To assess the contribution of modifiable risk factors to social inequalities in the incidence of type 2 diabetes when these factors are measured at study baseline or repeatedly over follow-up and when long term exposure is accounted for. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study with risk factors (health behaviours (smoking, alcohol consumption, diet, and physical (...) almost half of the social inequalities in incidence of type 2 diabetes. This is more than was seen in previous studies based on single measurement of risk factors.

BMJ2012 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

90. Trends in socioeconomic inequalities in risk of sudden infant death syndrome, other causes of infant mortality, and stillbirth in Scotland: population based study.

Trends in socioeconomic inequalities in risk of sudden infant death syndrome, other causes of infant mortality, and stillbirth in Scotland: population based study. OBJECTIVES: To compare changes in inequalities in sudden infant death syndrome with other causes of infant mortality and stillbirth in Scotland, 1985-2008. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Scotland 1985-2008, analysed by four epochs of six years. PARTICIPANTS: Singleton births of infants with birth weight >500 g born

BMJ2012 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

91. Increasing incidence of serious infectious diseases and inequalities in New Zealand: a national epidemiological study.

Increasing incidence of serious infectious diseases and inequalities in New Zealand: a national epidemiological study. BACKGROUND: Although the burden of infectious diseases seems to be decreasing in developed countries, few national studies have measured the total incidence of these diseases. We aimed to develop and apply a robust systematic method for monitoring the epidemiology of serious infectious diseases. METHODS: We did a national epidemiological study with all hospital admissions (...) overnight admissions were the events of interest. FINDINGS: Infectious diseases made the largest contribution to hospital admissions of any cause. Their contribution increased from 20·5% of acute admissions in 1989-93, to 26·6% in 2004-08. We noted clear ethnic and social inequalities in infectious disease risk. In 2004-08, the age-standardised rate ratio was 2·15 (95% CI 2·14-2·16) for Māori (indigenous New Zealanders) and 2·35 (2·34-2·37) for Pacific peoples compared with the European and other group

Lancet2012

92. Fair Enough? Inviting Inequities in State Health Benefits.

Fair Enough? Inviting Inequities in State Health Benefits. Fair enough? Inviting inequities in state health benefits. - PubMed - NCBI Warning: The NCBI web site requires JavaScript to function. Search database Search term Search Result Filters Format Summary Summary (text) Abstract Abstract (text) MEDLINE XML PMID List Apply Choose Destination File Clipboard Collections E-mail Order My Bibliography Citation manager Format Create File 1 selected item: 22316422 Format MeSH and Other Data E-mail (...) Subject Additional text E-mail Add to Clipboard Add to Collections Order articles Add to My Bibliography Generate a file for use with external citation management software. Create File 2012 Feb 23;366(8):681-3. doi: 10.1056/NEJMp1200751. Epub 2012 Feb 8. Fair enough? Inviting inequities in state health benefits. 1 . 1 Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA. PMID: 22316422 DOI: [Indexed for MEDLINE] Free full text MeSH terms Full Text Sources Medical PubMed Commons 0 comments How to cite

NEJM2012

93. Human papilloma virus vaccination programs reduce health inequity in most scenarios: a simulation study

Human papilloma virus vaccination programs reduce health inequity in most scenarios: a simulation study Human papilloma virus vaccination programs reduce health inequity in most scenarios: a simulation study | SCPHRP Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research & Policy Publication Information Date of Publication 31/10/2012 Link and The . SCPHRP is located within . Copyright © 2017 The University of Edinburgh. All rights reserved. . Site published by the , Information Services, .

Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research & Policy2012

94. Health inequalities and population health

Health inequalities and population health Health inequalities and population health | Guidance and guidelines | NICE Health inequalities and population health Local government briefing [LGB4] Published date: October 2012 Advice Between 2012 and 2015 we developed a series of local government briefings for a range of public health topics. We no longer have the capacity to maintain these to an acceptable standard and the information is now out of date, so these were removed from our website on 30

National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Advice2012

95. Health inequalities: an Olympic-size challenge

Health inequalities: an Olympic-size challenge Health inequalities: an Olympic-size challenge | The King's Fund Fill 1 Main navigation Health and care services Leadership, systems and organisations Patients, people and society Policy, finance and performance Search term Apply Health inequalities: an Olympic-size challenge This content relates to the following topics: Share this content Authors The good news is that government interventions have had a positive impact on healthy living. The bad

The King's Fund2012

96. Inequality in early childhood: risk and protective factors for early child development.

Inequality in early childhood: risk and protective factors for early child development. Inequality between and within populations has origins in adverse early experiences. Developmental neuroscience shows how early biological and psychosocial experiences affect brain development. We previously identified inadequate cognitive stimulation, stunting, iodine deficiency, and iron-deficiency anaemia as key risks that prevent millions of young children from attaining their developmental potential (...) to reduce children's risk exposure and to promote development in affected children. Our goal is to provide information to help the setting of priorities for early child development programmes and policies to benefit the world's poorest children and reduce persistent inequalities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Lancet2011

97. Strategies for reducing inequalities and improving developmental outcomes for young children in low-income and middle-income countries.

Strategies for reducing inequalities and improving developmental outcomes for young children in low-income and middle-income countries. This report is the second in a Series on early child development in low-income and middle-income countries and assesses the effectiveness of early child development interventions, such as parenting support and preschool enrolment. The evidence reviewed suggests that early child development can be improved through these interventions, with effects greater (...) for programmes of higher quality and for the most vulnerable children. Other promising interventions for the promotion of early child development include children's educational media, interventions with children at high risk, and combining the promotion of early child development with conditional cash transfer programmes. Effective investments in early child development have the potential to reduce inequalities perpetuated by poverty, poor nutrition, and restricted learning opportunities. A simulation model

Lancet2011

100. Socioeconomic inequalities in outcome of pregnancy and neonatal mortality associated with congenital anomalies: population based study.

Socioeconomic inequalities in outcome of pregnancy and neonatal mortality associated with congenital anomalies: population based study. OBJECTIVES: To investigate socioeconomic inequalities in outcome of pregnancy and neonatal mortality associated with congenital anomalies. DESIGN: Retrospective population based registry study. SETTING: East Midlands and South Yorkshire regions of England (representing about 10% of births in England and Wales). PARTICIPANTS: All registered cases of nine (...) detected in the antenatal period, and there was no evidence that this varied with deprivation (rate ratio 0.99, 0.84 to 1.17). The rate of termination after antenatal diagnosis of a congenital anomaly was lower in the most deprived areas compared with the least deprived areas (63% v 79%; rate ratio 0.80, 0.65 to 0.97). Consequently there were significant socioeconomic inequalities in the rate of live birth and neonatal mortality associated with the presence of any of these nine anomalies. Compared

BMJ2011 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro