Latest & greatest articles for inequality

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Top results for inequality

61. Changes in mortality inequalities over two decades: register based study of European countries.

Changes in mortality inequalities over two decades: register based study of European countries. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether government efforts in reducing inequalities in health in European countries have actually made a difference to mortality inequalities by socioeconomic group. DESIGN: Register based study. DATA SOURCE: Mortality data by level of education and occupational class in the period 1990-2010, usually collected in a census linked longitudinal study design. We compared changes (...) in mortality between the lowest and highest socioeconomic groups, and calculated their effect on absolute and relative inequalities in mortality (measured as rate differences and rate ratios, respectively). SETTING: All European countries for which data on socioeconomic inequalities in mortality were available for the approximate period between years 1990 and 2010. These included Finland, Norway, Sweden, Scotland, England and Wales (data applied to both together), France, Switzerland, Spain (Barcelona

BMJ2016 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

62. Health Protection Inequalities on the island of Ireland: An introductory paper

Health Protection Inequalities on the island of Ireland: An introductory paper Health Protection Inequalities on the island of Ireland: An introductory paper | Institute of Public Health in Ireland Corporate menu Search Main navigation Breadcrumb Health Protection Inequalities on the island of Ireland: An introductory paper Tags Division IPH Twitter IPH Websites Share This Footer menu New Corporate Menu The Institute of Public Health in Ireland Belfast Forestview Purdy's Lane Belfast BT8 7ZX

Institute of Public Health in Ireland2016

63. Community engagement: improving health and wellbeing and reducing health inequalities

Community engagement: improving health and wellbeing and reducing health inequalities Community engagement: impro Community engagement: improving ving health and wellbeing and reducing health health and wellbeing and reducing health inequalities inequalities NICE guideline Published: 4 March 2016 nice.org.uk/guidance/ng44 © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility (...) and to reduce health inequalities. Nothing in this guideline should be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with complying with those duties. Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Community engagement: improving health and wellbeing and reducing health inequalities (NG44) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject

National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines2016

64. The impact on health inequalities of approaches to community engagement in the New Deal for Communities regeneration initiative: a mixed-methods evaluation

The impact on health inequalities of approaches to community engagement in the New Deal for Communities regeneration initiative: a mixed-methods evaluation The impact on health inequalities of approaches to community engagement in the New Deal for Communities regeneration initiative: a mixed-methods evaluation The impact on health inequalities of approaches to community engagement in the New Deal for Communities regeneration initiative: a mixed-methods evaluation Popay J, Whitehead M, Carr-Hill (...) R, Dibben C, Dixon P, Halliday E, Nazroo J, Peart E, Povall S, Stafford M, Turner J, Walthery P Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Popay J, Whitehead M, Carr-Hill R, Dibben C, Dixon P, Halliday E, Nazroo J, Peart E, Povall S, Stafford M, Turner J, Walthery P. The impact on health inequalities of approaches to community

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2015

65. Potential of trans fats policies to reduce socioeconomic inequalities in mortality from coronary heart disease in England: cost effectiveness modelling study.

Potential of trans fats policies to reduce socioeconomic inequalities in mortality from coronary heart disease in England: cost effectiveness modelling study. OBJECTIVES: To determine health and equity benefits and cost effectiveness of policies to reduce or eliminate trans fatty acids from processed foods, compared with consumption remaining at most recent levels in England. DESIGN: Epidemiological modelling study. SETTING: Data from National Diet and Nutrition Survey, Low Income Diet (...) to government and industry; policy savings from reductions in direct healthcare, informal care, and productivity loss. RESULTS: A total ban on trans fatty acids in processed foods might prevent or postpone about 7200 deaths (2.6%) from coronary heart disease from 2015-20 and reduce inequality in mortality from coronary heart disease by about 3000 deaths (15%). Policies to improve labelling or simply remove trans fatty acids from restaurants/fast food could save between 1800 (0.7%) and 3500 (1.3%) deaths

BMJ2015 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

66. The future of life expectancy and life expectancy inequalities in England and Wales: Bayesian spatiotemporal forecasting.

The future of life expectancy and life expectancy inequalities in England and Wales: Bayesian spatiotemporal forecasting. BACKGROUND: To plan for pensions and health and social services, future mortality and life expectancy need to be forecast. Consistent forecasts for all subnational units within a country are very rare. Our aim was to forecast mortality and life expectancy for England and Wales' districts. METHODS: We developed Bayesian spatiotemporal models for forecasting of age-specific (...) years. National life expectancy in 2030 is expected to reach 85·7 (84·2-87·4) years for men and 87·6 (86·7-88·9) years for women, further reducing the female advantage to 1·9 years. Life expectancy will reach or surpass 81·4 years for men and reach or surpass 84·5 years for women in every district by 2030. Longevity inequality across districts, measured as the difference between the 1st and 99th percentiles of district life expectancies, has risen since 1981, and is forecast to rise steadily to 8·3

Lancet2015 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

67. Can community-based peer support promote health literacy and reduce inequalities? A realist review

Can community-based peer support promote health literacy and reduce inequalities? A realist review Can community-based peer support promote health literacy and reduce inequalities? A realist review Can community-based peer support promote health literacy and reduce inequalities? A realist review Harris J, Springett J, Croot L, Booth A, Campbell F, Thompson J, Goyder E, Van Cleemput P, Wilkins E, Yang Y Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from (...) a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Harris J, Springett J, Croot L, Booth A, Campbell F, Thompson J, Goyder E, Van Cleemput P, Wilkins E, Yang Y. Can community-based peer support promote health literacy and reduce inequalities? A realist review. Public Health Research 2015; 3(3) Authors' objectives To undertake a participatory realist synthesis to develop a better understanding of the potential for CBPS to promote better HL

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2015

68. How effective are interventions at reducing socioeconomic inequalities in obesity among children and adults? Two systematic reviews

How effective are interventions at reducing socioeconomic inequalities in obesity among children and adults? Two systematic reviews How effective are interventions at reducing socioeconomic inequalities in obesity among children and adults? Two systematic reviews How effective are interventions at reducing socioeconomic inequalities in obesity among children and adults? Two systematic reviews Bambra C, Hillier F, Cairns-Nagi J, Kasim A, Moore H, Summerbell C Record Status (...) This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Bambra C, Hillier F, Cairns-Nagi J, Kasim A, Moore H, Summerbell C. How effective are interventions at reducing socioeconomic inequalities in obesity among children and adults? Two systematic reviews. Public Health Research 2015; 3(1) Authors' objectives To systematically review the effectiveness of interventions (individual

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2015

69. Can community-based peer support promote health literacy and reduce inequalities? A realist review

Can community-based peer support promote health literacy and reduce inequalities? A realist review Can community-based peer support promote health literacy and reduce inequalities? A realist review Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need

NIHR HTA programme2015 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

70. Socioeconomic inequalities in adolescent health 2002-2010: a time-series analysis of 34 countries participating in the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study.

Socioeconomic inequalities in adolescent health 2002-2010: a time-series analysis of 34 countries participating in the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study. BACKGROUND: Information about trends in adolescent health inequalities is scarce, especially at an international level. We examined secular trends in socioeconomic inequality in five domains of adolescent health and the association of socioeconomic inequality with national wealth and income inequality. METHODS: We undertook a time (...) on the Cantril ladder) to examine trends in health and socioeconomic inequalities in health. We also investigated whether international differences in health and health inequalities were associated with per person income and income inequality. FINDINGS: From 2002 to 2010, average levels of physical activity (3·90 to 4·08 days per week; p<0·0001), body mass (zBMI -0·08 to 0·03; p<0·0001), and physical symptoms (3·06 to 3·20, p<0·0001), and life satisfaction (7·58 to 7·61; p=0·0034) slightly increased

Lancet2015

71. How effective are interventions at reducing socioeconomic inequalities in obesity among children and adults? Two systematic reviews

How effective are interventions at reducing socioeconomic inequalities in obesity among children and adults? Two systematic reviews How effective are interventions at reducing socioeconomic inequalities in obesity among children and adults? Two systematic reviews Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try (...) a website search above to find the information you need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} Study found that there is some evidence that interventions have the potential to reduce socioeconomic inequalities in obesity amongst children and adults and that obesity management interventions do not increase health inequalities. {{author}} {{($index , , , , & . Clare L Bambra, 1 ,2 ,* Frances C Hillier, 3 Joanne-Marie Cairns, 1 ,2 Adetayo Kasim, 2

NIHR HTA programme2015

72. Health Inequalities

Health Inequalities Health inequalities This site uses cookies. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you agree to our use of cookies. Health inequalities Health inequalities Health inequalities, differences in morbidity, life expectancy and access to health care – have risen to the forefront of the global healthcare agenda. General practice, with its unrivalled access to the heart of communities, has a central role in addressing both causes and consequences (...) of health inequalities in the UK. Our work aims to demonstrate how GPs can positively influence health inequalities as practitioners, commissioners and community leaders. It contains examples of good practice, relevant national guidance and links to useful resources from other organisations. Health Inequalities Policy Paper In May 2015 the RCGP published our policy paper on Health Inequalities detailing our position on the role of the GP in addressing health inequalities and the actions needed from

Royal College of General Practitioners2015

73. Open Space on Health Inequalities in Scotland

Open Space on Health Inequalities in Scotland Open Space on Health Inequalities in Scotland (Report) | SCPHRP Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research & Policy For more information about the event or the Working Age/Adult Life Working Group, contact or see the relevant pages on this website Publication Information Date of Publication 10/04/2015 Link and The . SCPHRP is located within . Copyright © 2017 The University of Edinburgh. All rights reserved. . Site published

Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research & Policy2015

74. Inequalities in life expectancy

Inequalities in life expectancy Inequalities in life expectancy | The King's Fund Fill 1 Main navigation Health and care services Leadership, systems and organisations Patients, people and society Policy, finance and performance Search term Apply Inequalities in life expectancy: Changes over time and implications for policy This content relates to the following topics: Share this content Related details Authors Publication details ISBN 978 1 909029 54 5 Pages 76 Our health is determined (...) by a complex mix of factors including income, housing and employment, lifestyles and access to health care and other services. There are significant inequalities in health between individuals and different groups in society. These inequalities are not random. In particular, there is a ‘social gradient’ in health; neighbourhood areas with higher levels of income deprivation typically have lower life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy. This relationship (known as the ‘Marmot curve’) formed

The King's Fund2015

75. The health inequality challenge

The health inequality challenge The health inequality challenge | The King's Fund Fill 1 Main navigation Health and care services Leadership, systems and organisations Patients, people and society Policy, finance and performance Search term Apply The health inequality challenge This content relates to the following topics: Share this content Related details Authors With the right local leadership and central government support, localism could help address the broad range of factors that drive (...) health inequalities in a particular area, writes David Buck in an article for the Fabian Society. Related publications Comments Add your comment Your name Email (your email will not be made public) Your job/role Organisation Comment Post comment You may also be interested in Quick links Connect with us Latest Tweet Newsletter Email First name Last name Sign up Footer © The King's Fund 2017 Registered charity: 1126980

The King's Fund2015

76. From work with men and boys to changes of social norms and reduction of inequities in gender relations: a conceptual shift in prevention of violence against women and girls.

From work with men and boys to changes of social norms and reduction of inequities in gender relations: a conceptual shift in prevention of violence against women and girls. Violence perpetrated by and against men and boys is a major public health problem. Although individual men's use of violence differs, engagement of all men and boys in action to prevent violence against women and girls is essential. We discuss why this engagement approach is theoretically important and how prevention (...) interventions have developed from treating men simply as perpetrators of violence against women and girls or as allies of women in its prevention, to approaches that seek to transform the relations, social norms, and systems that sustain gender inequality and violence. We review evidence of intervention effectiveness in the reduction of violence or its risk factors, features commonly seen in more effective interventions, and how strong evidence-based interventions can be developed with more robust use

Lancet2014 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

77. A systematic review of the effectiveness of individual, community and societal level interventions at reducing socioeconomic inequalities in obesity amongst adults

A systematic review of the effectiveness of individual, community and societal level interventions at reducing socioeconomic inequalities in obesity amongst adults A systematic review of the effectiveness of individual, community and societal level interventions at reducing socioeconomic inequalities in obesity amongst adults A systematic review of the effectiveness of individual, community and societal level interventions at reducing socioeconomic inequalities in obesity amongst adults Hillier (...) -Brown FC, Bambra CL, Cairns-Nagi JM, Kasim A, Moore HJ, Summerbell CD CRD summary This review concluded that individual, community and societal-level interventions do not increase inequalities. Some universal interventions reduced the socioeconomic gradient in obesity and many targeted interventions decreased obesity among lower socioeconomic groups. These conclusions reflect only the best available evidence; they do not reflect the complete evidence base. The reliability of the authors' conclusions

DARE.2014

78. The impact of NHS resource allocation policy on health inequalities in England 2001-11: longitudinal ecological study.

The impact of NHS resource allocation policy on health inequalities in England 2001-11: longitudinal ecological study. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the policy of increasing National Health Service funding to a greater extent in deprived areas in England compared with more affluent areas led to a reduction in geographical inequalities in mortality amenable to healthcare. DESIGN: Longitudinal ecological study. SETTING: 324 lower tier local authorities in England, classified by their baseline (...) in NHS resources to deprived areas accounted for a reduction in the gap between deprived and affluent areas in male mortality amenable to healthcare of 35 deaths per 100,000 population (95% confidence interval 27 to 42) and female mortality of 16 deaths per 100,000 (10 to 21). This explained 85% of the total reduction of absolute inequality in mortality amenable to healthcare during this time. Each additional £10 m of resources allocated to deprived areas was associated with a reduction in 4 deaths

BMJ2014 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

79. Income inequality and 30 day outcomes after acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia: retrospective cohort study.

Income inequality and 30 day outcomes after acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia: retrospective cohort study. OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between income inequality and the risk of mortality and readmission within 30 days of hospitalization. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries in the United States. Hierarchical, logistic regression models were developed to estimate the association between income inequality (measured at the US state level (...) ) and a patient's risk of mortality and readmission, while sequentially controlling for patient, hospital, other state, and patient socioeconomic characteristics. We considered a 0.05 unit increase in the Gini coefficient as a measure of income inequality. SETTING: US acute care hospitals. PARTICIPANTS: Patients aged 65 years and older, and hospitalized in 2006-08 with a principal diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, or pneumonia. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Risk of death within 30 days

BMJ2013 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

80. Inequalities in non-communicable diseases and effective responses.

Inequalities in non-communicable diseases and effective responses. In most countries, people who have a low socioeconomic status and those who live in poor or marginalised communities have a higher risk of dying from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) than do more advantaged groups and communities. Smoking rates, blood pressure, and several other NCD risk factors are often higher in groups with low socioeconomic status than in those with high socioeconomic status; the social gradient also depends (...) on the country's stage of economic development, cultural factors, and social and health policies. Social inequalities in risk factors account for more than half of inequalities in major NCDs, especially for cardiovascular diseases and lung cancer. People in low-income countries and those with low socioeconomic status also have worse access to health care for timely diagnosis and treatment of NCDs than do those in high-income countries or those with higher socioeconomic status. Reduction of NCDs

Lancet2013