Latest & greatest articles for inequality

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Top results for inequality

21. The King’s Fund response to the Mayor of London’s draft health inequalities strategy

The King’s Fund response to the Mayor of London’s draft health inequalities strategy The King’s Fund response to the Mayor of London’s draft health inequalities strategy | The King's Fund Fill 1 Main navigation Health and care services Leadership, systems and organisations Patients, people and society Policy, finance and performance Search term Apply The King’s Fund response to the Mayor of London’s draft health inequalities strategy This content relates to the following topics: Share (...) this content The King’s Fund is an independent health charity whose stipulates our work should include the promotion of health and alleviation of sickness, to confer benefit, whether directly or indirectly, for the health of Londoners. We interpret this broadly, and our national work has relevance to London, but we also undertake work and seek to influence in ways issues that will directly benefit Londoners’ health. As such we welcome the Mayor’s consultation on his future health inequalities strategy

The King's Fund2017

22. Could scale-up of parenting programmes improve child disruptive behaviour and reduce social inequalities? Using individual participant data meta-analysis to establish for whom programmes are effective and cost-effective

Could scale-up of parenting programmes improve child disruptive behaviour and reduce social inequalities? Using individual participant data meta-analysis to establish for whom programmes are effective and cost-effective Could scale-up of parenting programmes improve child disruptive behaviour and reduce social inequalities? Using individual participant data meta-analysis to establish for whom programmes are effective and cost-effective Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content

NIHR HTA programme2017

23. Is governance, gross domestic product, inequality, population size or country surface area associated with coverage and equity of health interventions? Ecological analyses of cross-sectional surveys from 80 countries

Is governance, gross domestic product, inequality, population size or country surface area associated with coverage and equity of health interventions? Ecological analyses of cross-sectional surveys from 80 countries 29225951 2018 11 13 2059-7908 2 4 2017 BMJ global health BMJ Glob Health Is governance, gross domestic product, inequality, population size or country surface area associated with coverage and equity of health interventions? Ecological analyses of cross-sectional surveys from 80 (...) national surveys. Gross domestic product (GDP), country surface area, population, Gini index and six governance indicators (control of corruption, political stability and absence of violence, government effectiveness, regulatory quality, rule of law, and voice and accountability). Levels and inequality in the composite coverage index (CCI), a weighted average of eight RMNCH interventions. Relative and absolute inequalities were measured through the concentration index (CIX) and slope index

BMJ global health2017 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

24. Patient navigation to reduce social inequalities in colorectal cancer screening participation: A cluster randomized controlled trial

Patient navigation to reduce social inequalities in colorectal cancer screening participation: A cluster randomized controlled trial 28823681 2017 08 21 2017 09 09 1096-0260 103 2017 Oct Preventive medicine Prev Med Patient navigation to reduce social inequalities in colorectal cancer screening participation: A cluster randomized controlled trial. 76-83 S0091-7435(17)30297-9 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.08.012 Despite free colorectal cancer screening in France, participation remains low and low (...) socioeconomic status is associated with a low participation. Our aim was to assess the effect of a screening navigation program on participation and the reduction in social inequalities in a national-level organized mass screening program for colorectal cancer by fecal-occult blood test (FOBT). A multicenter (3 French departments) cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted over two years. The cluster was a small geographical unit stratified according to a deprivation index and the place of residence

EvidenceUpdates2017

25. Key policies for addressing the social determinants of health and health inequities

Key policies for addressing the social determinants of health and health inequities Matthew Saunders | Ben Barr | Phil McHale | Christoph Hamelmann HEALTH EVIDENCE NETWORK SYNTHESIS REPORT 52 Key policies for addressing the social determinants of health and health inequitiesThe Health Evidence Network HEN – the Health Evidence Network – is an information service for public health decision-makers in the WHO European Region, in action since 2003 and initiated and coordinated by the WHO Regional (...) in 2003 through a Memorandum of Agreement between the Government of Italy, the Veneto Region and the WHO Regional Office for Europe. Health Evidence Network synthesis report 52 Key policies for addressing the social determinants of health and health inequities Matthew Saunders | Ben Barr | Phil McHale | Christoph HamelmannAbstract Evidence indicates that actions within four main themes (early child development, fair employment and decent work, social protection, and the living environment) are likely

WHO Health Evidence Network2017

26. How Social-Class Stereotypes Maintain Inequality

How Social-Class Stereotypes Maintain Inequality 29221511 2018 01 24 2018 12 01 2352-2518 18 2017 12 Current opinion in psychology Curr Opin Psychol How social-class stereotypes maintain inequality. 43-48 S2352-250X(17)30047-7 10.1016/j.copsyc.2017.07.033 Social class stereotypes support inequality through various routes: ambivalent content, early appearance in children, achievement consequences, institutionalization in education, appearance in cross-class social encounters, and prevalence (...) encounters ironically draw on stereotypes to reinforce the alleged competence of higher-status people and sometimes the alleged warmth of lower-status people. Countries with more inequality show more of these ambivalent stereotypes of both lower-SES and higher-SES people. At a variety of levels and life stages, social-class stereotypes reinforce inequality, but constructive contact can undermine them; future efforts need to address high-status privilege and to query more heterogeneous samples. Copyright

Current opinion in psychology2017 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

27. Investigating the impact of the English health inequalities strategy: time trend analysis.

Investigating the impact of the English health inequalities strategy: time trend analysis. Objective To investigate whether the English health inequalities strategy was associated with a decline in geographical health inequalities, compared with trends before and after the strategy. Design Time trend analysis. Setting Two groups of lower tier local authorities in England. The most deprived, bottom fifth and the rest of England. Intervention The English health inequalities strategy-a cross (...) government strategy implemented between 1997 and 2010 to reduce health inequalities in England. Trends in geographical health inequalities were assessed before (1983-2003), during (2004-12), and after (2013-15) the strategy using segmented linear regression. Main outcome measure Geographical health inequalities measured as the relative and absolute differences in male and female life expectancy at birth between the most deprived local authorities in England and the rest of the country. Results Before

BMJ2017 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

28. Strategies and governance to reduce health inequalities: evidences from a cross-European survey

Strategies and governance to reduce health inequalities: evidences from a cross-European survey 29202086 2018 11 13 2397-0642 2 2017 Global health research and policy Glob Health Res Policy Strategies and governance to reduce health inequalities: evidences from a cross-European survey. 18 10.1186/s41256-017-0038-7 The main objective of the paper is to identify the governance system related to policies to reduce health inequalities in the European regions. Considering the Action Spectrum (...) of inequalities and the check list of health equity governance, we developed a survey in the framework of the AIR Project - Addressing Inequalities Intervention in Regions - was an European project funded by the Executive Agency of Health and Consumers. A web-based qualitative questionnaire was developed that collected information about practiced strategies to reduce health inequalities. In total 28 questionnaires from 28 different regions, related to 13countries, were suitable for the analysis. Progress

Global health research and policy2017 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

29. Inequalities in non-communicable diseases between the major population groups in Israel: achievements and challenges.

Inequalities in non-communicable diseases between the major population groups in Israel: achievements and challenges. Israel is a high-income country with an advanced health system and universal health-care insurance. Overall, the health status has improved steadily over recent decades. We examined differences in morbidity, mortality, and risk factors for selected non-communicable diseases (NCDs) between subpopulation groups. Between 1975 and 2014, life expectancy in Israel steadily increased (...) Arabs than Jews. Smoking prevalence is highest for Arab men and lowest for Arab women. Health inequalities are also evident by the indicators of socioeconomic position and in subpopulations, such as immigrants from the former Soviet Union, ultra-Orthodox Jews, and Bedouin Arabs. Despite universal health coverage and substantial improvements in the overall health of the Israeli population, substantial inequalities in NCDs persist. These differences might be explained, at least in part, by gaps

Lancet2017

30. Trends in social inequality in physical inactivity among Danish adolescents 1991–2014

Trends in social inequality in physical inactivity among Danish adolescents 1991–2014 29349244 2018 11 13 2352-8273 3 2017 Dec SSM - population health SSM Popul Health Trends in social inequality in physical inactivity among Danish adolescents 1991-2014. 534-538 10.1016/j.ssmph.2017.04.003 The aim of this study was to investigate social inequality in physical inactivity among adolescents from 1991 to 2014 and to describe any changes in inequality during this period. The analyses were based (...) adolescents was 5.4% in high social class and 7.8% and 10.8%, respectively, in middle and low social class. The absolute social inequality measured as prevalence difference between low and high social class did not change systematically across the observation period from 1991 to 2014. Compared to high social class, OR (95% CI) for physical inactivity was 1.48 (1.32-1.65) in middle social class and 2.18 (1.92-2.47) in lower social class. This relative social inequality was similar in the seven data

SSM - population health2017 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

31. Mass incarceration, public health, and widening inequality in the USA.

Mass incarceration, public health, and widening inequality in the USA. In this Series paper, we examine how mass incarceration shapes inequality in health. The USA is the world leader in incarceration, which disproportionately affects black populations. Nearly one in three black men will ever be imprisoned, and nearly half of black women currently have a family member or extended family member who is in prison. However, until recently the public health implications of mass incarceration were

Lancet2017

32. Population health in an era of rising income inequality: USA, 1980-2015.

Population health in an era of rising income inequality: USA, 1980-2015. Income inequality in the USA has increased over the past four decades. Socioeconomic gaps in survival have also increased. Life expectancy has risen among middle-income and high-income Americans whereas it has stagnated among poor Americans and even declined in some demographic groups. Although the increase in income inequality since 1980 has been driven largely by soaring top incomes, the widening of survival inequalities (...) has occurred lower in the distribution-ie, between the poor and upper-middle class. Growing survival gaps across income percentiles since 2001 reflect falling real incomes among poor Americans as well as an increasingly strong association between low income and poor health. Changes in individual risk factors such as smoking, obesity, and substance abuse play a part but do not fully explain the steeper gradient. Distal factors correlated with rising inequality including unequal access

Lancet2017

33. Inequality and the health-care system in the USA.

Inequality and the health-care system in the USA. Widening economic inequality in the USA has been accompanied by increasing disparities in health outcomes. The life expectancy of the wealthiest Americans now exceeds that of the poorest by 10-15 years. This report, part of a Series on health and inequality in the USA, focuses on how the health-care system, which could reduce income-based disparities in health, instead often exacerbates them. Other articles in this Series address population (...) health inequalities, and the health effects of racism, mass incarceration, and the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Poor Americans have worse access to care than do wealthy Americans, partly because many remain uninsured despite coverage expansions since 2010 due to the ACA. For individuals with private insurance, rising premiums and cost sharing have undermined wage gains and driven many households into debt and even bankruptcy. Meanwhile, the share of health-care resources devoted to care of the wealthy

Lancet2017

34. Structural racism and health inequities in the USA: evidence and interventions.

Structural racism and health inequities in the USA: evidence and interventions. Despite growing interest in understanding how social factors drive poor health outcomes, many academics, policy makers, scientists, elected officials, journalists, and others responsible for defining and responding to the public discourse remain reluctant to identify racism as a root cause of racial health inequities. In this conceptual report, the third in a Series on equity and equality in health in the USA, we (...) use a contemporary and historical perspective to discuss research and interventions that grapple with the implications of what is known as structural racism on population health and health inequities. Structural racism refers to the totality of ways in which societies foster racial discrimination through mutually reinforcing systems of housing, education, employment, earnings, benefits, credit, media, health care, and criminal justice. These patterns and practices in turn reinforce discriminatory

Lancet2017

35. Does gender inequity increase men's mortality risk in the United States? A multilevel analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Mortality Study

Does gender inequity increase men's mortality risk in the United States? A multilevel analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Mortality Study 29349229 2018 11 13 2352-8273 3 2017 Dec SSM - population health SSM Popul Health Does gender inequity increase men's mortality risk in the United States? A multilevel analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Mortality Study. 358-365 10.1016/j.ssmph.2017.03.003 A number of theoretical approaches suggest that gender inequity may give rise (...) to health risks for men. This study undertook a multilevel analysis to ascertain if state-level measures of gender inequity are predictors of men's mortality in the United States. Data for the analysis were taken primarily from the National Longitudinal Mortality Study, which is based on a random sample of the non-institutionalised population. The full data set included 174,703 individuals nested within 50 states and had a six-year follow-up for mortality. Gender inequity was measured by nine variables

SSM - population health2017 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

36. Family of origin and educational inequalities in mortality: Results from 1.7 million Swedish siblings

Family of origin and educational inequalities in mortality: Results from 1.7 million Swedish siblings 29349216 2018 11 13 2352-8273 3 2017 Dec SSM - population health SSM Popul Health Family of origin and educational inequalities in mortality: Results from 1.7 million Swedish siblings. 192-200 10.1016/j.ssmph.2017.01.008 Circumstances in the family of origin have short- and long-term consequences for people's health. Family background also influences educational achievements - achievements (...) or farmer background. There was substantial variation across different causes of death with clear reductions in educational inequalities in, e.g., lung cancer and diabetes, when introducing shared family factors, which may indicate that part of the association can be ascribed to circumstances that siblings have in common. In contrast, educational inequalities in suicide and, for women, other mental disorders increased when adjusting for factors shared by siblings. The vast variation in the role

SSM - population health2017 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

37. The evolution of socioeconomic status-related inequalities in maternal health care utilization: evidence from Zimbabwe, 1994–2011

The evolution of socioeconomic status-related inequalities in maternal health care utilization: evidence from Zimbabwe, 1994–2011 29202069 2018 11 13 2397-0642 2 2017 Global health research and policy Glob Health Res Policy The evolution of socioeconomic status-related inequalities in maternal health care utilization: evidence from Zimbabwe, 1994-2011. 1 10.1186/s41256-016-0021-8 Inequalities in maternal health care are pervasive in the developing world, a fact that has led to questions about (...) the extent of these disparities across socioeconomic groups. Despite a growing literature on maternal health across Sub-Saharan African countries, relatively little is known about the evolution of these inequalities over time for specific countries. This study sought to quantify and explain the observed differences in prenatal care use and professional delivery assistance in Zimbabwe. The empirical analysis uses four rounds of the nationwide Zimbabwe Demographic and Health Survey administered in 1994

Global health research and policy2017 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

38. Social determinants of health inequalities.

Social determinants of health inequalities. The gross inequalities in health that we see within and between countries present a challenge to the world. That there should be a spread of life expectancy of 48 years among countries and 20 years or more within countries is not inevitable. A burgeoning volume of research identifies social factors at the root of much of these inequalities in health. Social determinants are relevant to communicable and non-communicable disease alike. Health status

Lancet2017

39. Educational inequalities in cause-specific mortality in middle-aged and older men and women in eight western European populations.

Educational inequalities in cause-specific mortality in middle-aged and older men and women in eight western European populations. BACKGROUND: Studies of socioeconomic disparities in patterns of cause of death have been limited to single countries, middle-aged people, men, or broad cause of death groups. We assessed contribution of specific causes of death to disparities in mortality between groups with different levels of education, in men and women, middle-aged and old, in eight western (...) European populations. METHODS: We analysed data from longitudinal mortality studies by cause of death, between Jan 1, 1990, and Dec 31, 1997. Data were included for more than 1 million deaths in 51 million person years of observation. FINDINGS: Absolute educational inequalities in total mortality peaked at 2127 deaths per 100000 person years in men, and at 1588 deaths per 100000 person years in women aged 75 years and older. In this age-group, rate ratios were greater than 1.00 for total mortality

Lancet2017

40. Working together to reduce health inequalities

Working together to reduce health inequalities Working together to reduce health inequalities - NIPH Selected items added to basket Close Vis søkefelt How can we help you today? Search for: Søk Menu • • Working together to reduce health inequalities Søk i Folkehelsa.no Search for: Søk Infectious diseases & Vaccines Close Mental & Physical health Close Environment & Lifestyle Close Health in Norway Close Quality & Knowledge Close Research & Access to data Close Published 08.12.2017 Address

The Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services2017