Latest & greatest articles for hypothermia

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Top results for hypothermia

161. Treatment of traumatic brain injury with moderate hypothermia.

Treatment of traumatic brain injury with moderate hypothermia. 9023090 1997 02 25 1997 02 25 2007 11 14 0028-4793 336 8 1997 Feb 20 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Treatment of traumatic brain injury with moderate hypothermia. 540-6 Traumatic brain injury initiates several metabolic processes that can exacerbate the injury. There is evidence that hypothermia may limit some of these deleterious metabolic responses. In a randomized, controlled trial, we compared the effects (...) of moderate hypothermia and normothermia in 82 patients with severe closed head injuries (a score of 3 to 7 on the Glasgow Coma Scale). The patients assigned to hypothermia were cooled to 33 degrees C a mean of 10 hours after injury, kept at 32 degrees to 33 degrees C for 24 hours, and then rewarmed. A specialist in physical medicine and rehabilitation who was unaware of the treatment assignments evaluated the patients 3, 6, and 12 months later with the use of the Glasgow Outcome Scale. The demographic

NEJM1997

162. Mild hypothermia increases blood loss and transfusion requirements during total hip arthroplasty.

Mild hypothermia increases blood loss and transfusion requirements during total hip arthroplasty. 8569362 1996 03 01 1996 03 01 2015 06 16 0140-6736 347 8997 1996 Feb 03 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Mild hypothermia increases blood loss and transfusion requirements during total hip arthroplasty. 289-92 In-vitro studies indicate that platelet function and the coagulation cascade are impaired by hypothermia. However, the extent to which perioperative hypothermia influences bleeding during (...) surgery remains unknown. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that mild hypothermia increases blood loss and allogeneic transfusion requirements during hip arthroplasty. Blood loss and transfusion requirements were evaluated in 60 patients undergoing primary, unilateral total hip arthroplasties who were randomly assigned to normothermia (final intraoperative core temperature 36.6 [0.4] degrees C) or mild hypothermia (35.0 [0.5] degrees C). Crystalloid, colloid, scavenged red cells, and allogeneic

Lancet1996