Latest & greatest articles for hypothermia

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Top results for hypothermia

121. A systematic review of the effectiveness of cutaneous warming systems to prevent hypothermia

A systematic review of the effectiveness of cutaneous warming systems to prevent hypothermia A systematic review of the effectiveness of cutaneous warming systems to prevent hypothermia A systematic review of the effectiveness of cutaneous warming systems to prevent hypothermia Galvao CM, Marck PB, Sawada NO, Clark AM CRD summary This review concluded that carbon-fibre blankets and forced-air warming systems were equally effective in preventing hypothermia during surgery in elective patients (...) , while circulating-water garments were the most effective in maintaining normothermia. This was a generally well-conducted review and the authors' conclusions appear to reflect the evidence, but limitations with the included trials should be taken into consideration. Authors' objectives To assess the effectiveness of cutaneous warming systems in the prevention of hypothermia in elective patients during surgery. Searching CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials

DARE.2009

122. Prehospital/emergency department therapeutic hypothermia for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in adults

Prehospital/emergency department therapeutic hypothermia for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in adults Prehospital/emergency department therapeutic hypothermia for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in adults Prehospital/emergency department therapeutic hypothermia for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in adults Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database (...) . Report may be purchased from . Citation Prehospital/emergency department therapeutic hypothermia for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in adults . Lansdale: HAYES, Inc.. 2009 Authors' objectives Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) causes approximately 310,000 deaths before the patient reaches the hospital Emergency Department each year in the United States. Sudden cardiac death occurs more often in patients who are recovering from a heart attack or whose hearts have a reduced ability to pump

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2009

124. Moderate hypothermia to treat perinatal asphyxial encephalopathy.

Moderate hypothermia to treat perinatal asphyxial encephalopathy. 19797281 2009 10 02 2009 10 06 2016 11 22 1533-4406 361 14 2009 Oct 01 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Moderate hypothermia to treat perinatal asphyxial encephalopathy. 1349-58 10.1056/NEJMoa0900854 Whether hypothermic therapy improves neurodevelopmental outcomes in newborn infants with asphyxial encephalopathy is uncertain. We performed a randomized trial of infants who were less than 6 hours of age and had (...) scores on the Mental Developmental Index and Psychomotor Developmental Index of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development II (P=0.03 for each) and the Gross Motor Function Classification System (P=0.01). Improvements in other neurologic outcomes in the cooled group were not significant. Adverse events were mostly minor and not associated with cooling. Induction of moderate hypothermia for 72 hours in infants who had perinatal asphyxia did not significantly reduce the combined rate of death or severe

NEJM2009

125. Induced hypothermia and fever control for prevention and treatment of neurological injuries.

Induced hypothermia and fever control for prevention and treatment of neurological injuries. Increasing evidence suggests that induction of mild hypothermia (32-35 degrees C) in the first hours after an ischaemic event can prevent or mitigate permanent injuries. This effect has been shown most clearly for postanoxic brain injury, but could also apply to other organs such as the heart and kidneys. Hypothermia has also been used as a treatment for traumatic brain injury, stroke, hepatic (...) encephalopathy, myocardial infarction, and other indications. Hypothermia is a highly promising treatment in neurocritical care; thus, physicians caring for patients with neurological injuries, both in and outside the intensive care unit, are likely to be confronted with questions about temperature management more frequently. This Review discusses the available evidence for use of controlled hypothermia, and also deals with fever control. Besides discussing the evidence, the aim is to provide information

Lancet2008

126. Interventions to prevent hypothermia at birth in preterm and/or low birthweight infants.

Interventions to prevent hypothermia at birth in preterm and/or low birthweight infants. BACKGROUND: Hypothermia incurred during routine postnatal resuscitation is a world-wide issue (across all climates), associated with morbidity and mortality. Keeping vulnerable preterm infants warm is problematic even when recommended routine thermal care guidelines are followed in the delivery suite. OBJECTIVES: To assess efficacy and safety of interventions designed for prevention of hypothermia (...) (DARE 1994 to July 2007), conference/symposia proceedings using ZETOC (1993 to 17/08/2007), ISI proceedings (1990 to 17/08/2007) and OCLC WorldCat (July 2007). Identified articles were cross-referenced. No language restrictions were imposed. SELECTION CRITERIA: All trials using randomised or quasi-randomised allocations to test a specific intervention designed to prevent hypothermia, (apart from 'routine' thermal care) applied within 10 minutes after birth in the delivery suite to infants of < 37

Cochrane2008

127. Hypothermia treatment for traumatic brain injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Hypothermia treatment for traumatic brain injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis Hypothermia treatment for traumatic brain injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis Hypothermia treatment for traumatic brain injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis Peterson K, Carson S, Carney N CRD summary The authors concluded that in specific circumstances hypothermia may reduce mortality and increase the likelihood of a favourable neurological outcome in adults with traumatic brain injury (...) : more research is needed. Although the review was well conducted in many respects, these conclusions may need to be regarded cautiously, given the rather limited search and the questionable quality of the primary studies. Authors' objectives To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of hypothermia for treating adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Searching Four previously published systematic reviews were hand searched for relevant studies (see Other publications of related interest). Search

DARE.2008

128. The effects of mild perioperative hypothermia on blood loss and transfusion requirement

The effects of mild perioperative hypothermia on blood loss and transfusion requirement The effects of mild perioperative hypothermia on blood loss and transfusion requirement The effects of mild perioperative hypothermia on blood loss and transfusion requirement Rajagopalan S, Mascha E, Na J, Sessler D I CRD summary This review evaluated the impact of mild perioperative hypothermia on surgical blood loss and transfusion requirements. The authors concluded that that even mild hypothermia may (...) significantly increase blood loss by approximately 16 per cent (4-26%) and increase the risk of a transfusion being required by around 22 per cent (3-37%). Due to limitations in the review methodology and reporting, these results should be treated with caution. Authors' objectives To evaluate the impact of mild perioperative hypothermia on surgical blood loss and transfusion requirements. Searching MEDLINE (1966-2006) and The Cochrane Library (2006) were searched in all languages (search terms reported

DARE.2008

129. Clinical practice guideline for the management of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia in adults

Clinical practice guideline for the management of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia in adults

Royal College of Nursing2008

131. Hypothermia therapy after traumatic brain injury in children.

Hypothermia therapy after traumatic brain injury in children. 18525042 2008 06 05 2008 06 19 2010 11 18 1533-4406 358 23 2008 Jun 05 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Hypothermia therapy after traumatic brain injury in children. 2447-56 10.1056/NEJMoa0706930 Hypothermia therapy improves survival and the neurologic outcome in animal models of traumatic brain injury. However, the effect of hypothermia therapy on the neurologic outcome and mortality among children who have (...) severe traumatic brain injury is unknown. In a multicenter, international trial, we randomly assigned children with severe traumatic brain injury to either hypothermia therapy (32.5 degrees C for 24 hours) initiated within 8 hours after injury or to normothermia (37.0 degrees C). The primary outcome was the proportion of children who had an unfavorable outcome (i.e., severe disability, persistent vegetative state, or death), as assessed on the basis of the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category

NEJM2008

132. Hypothermia to treat neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy: systematic review

Hypothermia to treat neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy: systematic review Hypothermia to treat neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy: systematic review Hypothermia to treat neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy: systematic review Shah P S, Ohlsson A, Perlman M CRD summary This well-conducted review concluded that hypothermia is safe and effective at reducing death and moderate to severe neurodevelopmental disability in neonates with with postintrapartum asphyxial hypoxic-ischaemic (...) encephalopathy. The authors' conclusions appear reliable despite the differences between the studies and the lack of long-term data. Authors' objectives To compare the effectiveness and safety of hypothermia verus normothermia in neonates with postintrapartum asphyxial hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE). Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library were searched up to December 2006; the search terms were reported. Abstracts from annual meetings of the Pediatric Academic Societies

DARE.2007

134. Review: mild induced hypothermia does not reduce mortality or severe disability in moderate to severe head injury

Review: mild induced hypothermia does not reduce mortality or severe disability in moderate to severe head injury Review: mild induced hypothermia does not reduce mortality or severe disability in moderate to severe head injury | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in via your Society Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password (...) * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in via your Society Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: mild induced hypothermia does not reduce mortality or severe disability in moderate to severe head injury Article Text Treatment Review: mild induced hypothermia does not reduce mortality or severe disability in moderate

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2006

135. Systematic review of randomized controlled trials of therapeutic hypothermia as a neuroprotectant in post cardiac arrest patients

Systematic review of randomized controlled trials of therapeutic hypothermia as a neuroprotectant in post cardiac arrest patients Systematic review of randomized controlled trials of therapeutic hypothermia as a neuroprotectant in post cardiac arrest patients Systematic review of randomized controlled trials of therapeutic hypothermia as a neuroprotectant in post cardiac arrest patients Cheung K W, Green R S, Magee K D CRD summary The authors concluded that the induction of mild hypothermia (...) reduces in-hospital mortality and improves neurological outcomes in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest, but more information about adverse events is required. Overall, this was a well-conducted review and the authors' conclusions are likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effects of mild induced hypothermia in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. Searching The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (Issue 4, 2005), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and Web of Science were searched from

DARE.2006

137. Therapeutic Hypothermia after Resuscitation from Cardiac Arrest</a>

Therapeutic Hypothermia after Resuscitation from Cardiac Arrest Therapeutic Hypothermia after Resuscitation from Cardiac Arrest We use cookies on this website. By using this site, you agree that we may store and access cookies on your device. Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services Therapeutic Hypothermia after Resuscitation from Cardiac Arrest Share: Reading time approx. 6 minutes This document was published more than 2 years ago. The nature (...) cardiopulmonary resuscitation and treatment. The outcome of treatment depends partly on the time that has elapsed between cardiac arrest and the reestablishment of stable circulation. Most patients who are resuscitated from cardiac arrest are unconscious and require care at an intensive care unit. Lowering the body temperature (induced hypothermia) after resuscitation from cardiac arrest is a treatment method intended to limit the damage, mainly to the brain, that occurs when blood circulation ceases. Body temperature

Swedish Council on Technology Assessement2006

138. Selective head cooling with mild systemic hypothermia after neonatal encephalopathy: multicentre randomised trial.

Selective head cooling with mild systemic hypothermia after neonatal encephalopathy: multicentre randomised trial. 15721471 2005 02 21 2005 03 22 2016 11 22 1474-547X 365 9460 2005 Feb 19-25 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Selective head cooling with mild systemic hypothermia after neonatal encephalopathy: multicentre randomised trial. 663-70 Cerebral hypothermia can improve outcome of experimental perinatal hypoxia-ischaemia. We did a multicentre randomised controlled trial to find out (...) examined in two predefined subgroup analyses the effect of hypothermia in babies with the most severe aEEG changes before randomisation--ie, severe loss of background amplitude, and seizures--and those with less severe changes. In 16 babies, follow-up data were not available. Thus in 218 infants (93%), 73/110 (66%) allocated conventional care and 59/108 (55%) assigned head cooling died or had severe disability at 18 months (odds ratio 0.61; 95% CI 0.34-1.09, p=0.1). After adjustment for the severity

Lancet2005

139. Inducing hypothermia to decrease neurological deficit: literature review

Inducing hypothermia to decrease neurological deficit: literature review Inducing hypothermia to decrease neurological deficit: literature review Inducing hypothermia to decrease neurological deficit: literature review Zeitzer M B CRD summary This review evaluated the impact of inducing hypothermia on neurological deficit in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. It concluded that, in line with current recommendations of the Advanced Life Support Task Force, this method should be adopted in practice (...) . Limitations in the review process and evidence presented mean that this conclusion is not supported and cannot be considered reliable. Authors' objectives To determine the effectiveness of inducing hypothermia to decrease neurological deficit after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Searching MEDLINE (1966 to 2004), BIOSIS Previews (1993 to 2004), CINAHL (1982 to 2004), HealthSTAR (1975 to 2004), Wilson Applied Science and Technology (1983 to 2004) and MD Consult (1983 to 2004) were searched for articles

DARE.2005

140. Coolgard 3000 Catheter Thermal Regulation system: endovascular hypothermia induction for treatment of comatose survivors of ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest

Coolgard 3000 Catheter Thermal Regulation system: endovascular hypothermia induction for treatment of comatose survivors of ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest Horizon Scanning - Horizon scanning prioritising summary - Coolgard™ 3000 Catheter Thermal Regulation System: endovascular hypothermia induction for treatment of comatose survivors of ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest. September 2005. Horizon Scanning HealthPACT > > Search Search Horizon scanning prioritising summary - Coolgard (...) ™ 3000 Catheter Thermal Regulation System: endovascular hypothermia induction for treatment of comatose survivors of ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest. September 2005. Australia and New Zealand Horizon Scanning Network - Technologies Assessed This report is based on information available at the time of research and cannot be expected to cover any developments arising from subsequent improvements to health technologies. This report is based on a limited literature search and is not a definitive

Australia and New Zealand Horizon Scanning Network2005